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Sisterhood of Dune (Schools of Dune series Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Brian Herbert , Kevin J. Anderson
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (191 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $9.99
Sold by: Macmillan
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Book Description

It is eighty-three years after the last of the thinking machines were destroyed in the Battle of Corrin, after Faykan Butler took the name of Corrino and established himself as the first Emperor of a new Imperium. Great changes are brewing that will shape and twist all of humankind.



The war hero Vorian Atreides has turned his back on politics and Salusa Secundus. The descendants of Abulurd Harkonnen Griffen and Valya have sworn vengeance against Vor, blaming him for the downfall of their fortunes. Raquella Berto-Anirul has formed the Bene Gesserit School on the jungle planet Rossak as the first Reverend Mother. The descendants of Aurelius Venport and Norma Cenva have built Venport Holdings, using mutated, spice-saturated Navigators who fly precursors of Heighliners. Gilbertus Albans, the ward of the hated Erasmus, is teaching humans to become Mentats…and hiding an unbelievable secret.



The Butlerian movement, rabidly opposed to all forms of "dangerous technology," is led by Manford Torondo and his devoted Swordmaster, Anari Idaho. And it is this group, so many decades after the defeat of the thinking machines, which begins to sweep across the known universe in mobs, millions strong, destroying everything in its path.



Every one of these characters, and all of these groups, will become enmeshed in the contest between Reason and Faith. All of them will be forced to choose sides in the inevitable crusade that could destroy humankind forever….




Editorial Reviews

Review

“In his inimitable style, Brick draws upon his well-established characterizations to weave the threads of the plot and maintain interest and focus.” – AudioFile Magazine

About the Author

 

Brian Herbert, the son of Frank Herbert, is a multiple New York Times bestselling author in his own right. He is the winner of several literary honors and has been nominated for the Nebula award. His critically acclaimed science fiction novels include Sidney's Comet, Sudanna Sudanna, The Race for God, and Man of Two Worlds (written with Frank Herbert). Recently, he completed Dreamer of Dune, a comprehensive biography of his illustrious father.

Kevin J. Anderson has written twenty-nine national bestsellers and has been nominated for the Nebula Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFX Reader's Choice Award. His critically acclaimed original novels include Captain Nemo, Hopscotch, and Hidden Empire. He also set the Guiness world record for "Largest Single-Author Book Signing."
 

Scott Brick first began narrating audiobooks in 2000, and after recording almost 400 titles in five years, AudioFile magazine named Brick a Golden Voice and “one of the fastest-rising stars in the audiobook galaxy.” He has read a number of titles in Frank Herbert’s bestselling Dune series, and he won the 2003 Science Fiction Audie Award for Dune: The Butlerian Jihad. Brick has narrated for many popular authors, including Michael Pollan, Joseph Finder, Tom Clancy, and Ayn Rand. He has also won over 40 AudioFile Earphones Awards and the AudioFile award for Best Voice in Mystery and Suspense 2011. In 2007, Brick was named Publishers Weekly’s Narrator of the Year.

 


Product Details

  • File Size: 1376 KB
  • Print Length: 497 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (January 3, 2012)
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005HWLKOG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,210 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
106 of 116 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dune has jumped the shark February 21, 2012
Format:Hardcover
I've read every single Dune book. This review is not a statement of someone who categorically hates the new authors. I enjoyed the "Houses" trilogy; though they were not in the same style as Frank, the story was very enjoyable. The Jihad trilogy and Hunter/Sandworms had good and bad points, but I liked them. I think that any Dune fan should read those.

But with this book I think I am done with the series.

I found myself just angry as I read this, trying to finish as quickly as possible and get on to another book that I wanted to read more. The writing style is childish. Conversations are obvious and predictable, like a TV show script. This is a Dune novel? Remember those conversations in the original series where the characters were all "smarter than you"? When you couldn't understand what they were talking about until many chapters later? When there were many layers of "plots within plots?" When you had to THINK? Nope, won't find that here.

Instead, we get horribly one dimensional characters: grunting thugs (Anari), cookie-cutter zealouts (Manford), mindlessly vengeful women (Harkonnen). The characters are not likable nor do you feel empathy for them. And the story? Whereas previous BH/KJA novels were retelling pieces of Dune, this is nothing more than a retcon. They already told us how the Butlerian Jihad ended and the initiation of the societies we know about ... and now they are telling us that it isn't REALLY over, and that all those societies weren't REALLY doing what you expected. To do this, they need to twist the story so it can be retold. If that sounds familiar, you've seen it on many TV shows that try to extend additional seasons (Alias, Heroes, etc).

It's called "Jumping the Shark".
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46 of 51 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars strong two, weak three--mostly flat February 10, 2012
Format:Hardcover
The Sisterhood of Dune is the latest installment by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson in the add-ons to Frank Herbert's classic Dune series. To be honest, it's a series I gave up on after the The Battle of Corrin--the third book in the opening Legends of Dune group--after it continued a downward spiral from a solid if not inspiring book one (The Butlerian Jihad). It's several years and books later, and I wish I could say Sisterhood recaptured my interest, but unfortunately I found many of the same problems that caused me to give up the earlier series.

The human race has won against the machines, but the Butlerians, led by Manford Torondo, are trying to force the complete rejection of nearly all technology (while blind or self-rationalizing about their own uses of said tech of course). Meanwhile, the Bene Gesserit is in its embryonic stages as the very first Reverend Mother, Raquella Berto-Anirul, continues to try to find a way to create others in her Sisterhood, even as they explore the possibilities of a human breeding program, aided by "thinking machines" that would bring the wrath of the Butlerians down on them. As these two groups grow in power, the Corinno Emperor is having a hard time solidifying his own and standing up against the Butlerians especially, even as other groups and schools and factions rise and fall--the Suk school, the Swordmaster school, the Mentat school led by Gilbertus Albans--who has his own dangerous secret, the Venport Space Fleet, which is the Navigators Guild in its nascent stage, and so on. Along with all the galactic politics, more personal motives arise as two young Harkonnen heirs seek vengeance on the disappeared Vorian Atreides who enters back on stage after long absence.
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33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Enough! June 25, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Brian and Kevin: enough is enough already.

Make up a new story outside of "Dune". This is long past ridiculous. Whatever, Brian- you're Frank Herbert's son, I know- but please! Just move on. As many, many others have pointed out, you are not even 1/5th of the author your dad was on his worst day. These books read like fan-fic from a group of 12 year olds. The stories are poorly plotted, the dialogue is inane and (worst of all), you don't even use the original books and the Dune Encyclopedia as references (!?!?!?) when you write.

I heard that you found a secret cache of notes for "Dune 7", but I sincerely doubt it. I know that you are supposedly basing all of these books on things your father said/wrote, but again, I doubt it, considering that your version of the Dune universe bears little or no resemblance to the original. I would be satisfied if you would put a disclaimer on the title page saying that the new books are not what FH envisioned, that they're your own take on the series- but no, you insist that these books are canon, and that the original books are not. How ridiculous! Even modern authors who write new Sherlock Holmes stories don't make that claim- and their works belong to a much less expansive universe.

Let it go, man. It's a cash cow, but it's past its prime. The milk's gone bad.

I suppose it might be a mystery to you, why I care. I don't eat and breathe Dune, but I have read every book in the series. I own the Dune Encyclopedia, as well as a number of Frank's other books. He was good author, who wrote books that were genuinely fun to read.
I care because just knowing that your books exist lessens my enjoyment of the originals.there was such potential for the prequels and sequels, and you frittered it away for a dump truck full of money and the illusion that you would be considered as good a writer as Frank. Thanks, Brian.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars A Novel of Epic Stupidity!
OMFG WTF were they thinking when they even wrote this trash! Their editors should be hanged by the balls!
Published 5 days ago by Hamilton Carver
5.0 out of 5 stars Great visual read.
This book is a great read, one that you want to read through immediately, but you also need to take time to take in all the details.
Published 8 days ago by Garion
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
I love the Dune series, big big fan.
Published 15 days ago by eric nelson
5.0 out of 5 stars good book in the series
another interesting addition to the whole dune world. not super great writing, but in the spirit of the whole story telling theme and characters that span the whole history. Read more
Published 21 days ago by cteno4
1.0 out of 5 stars A million deaths are not enough for brian herbert
Brian and Kevin fail in every conceivable way there is to fail as a writer. The story arcs are abysmal, and the characters could exist in any sci-fi genre, except for Frank's Dune,... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Jason Kirby
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Arrived in good condition.
Published 1 month ago by John Vollmer
5.0 out of 5 stars Good addition to the Dune series.
The Dune series is possibly the best Science Fiction series ever written! And the books written by the son, Brian Herbert, are every bit as good as those written by his father. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Amazon Customer
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed!!!
I know there is an opinion jihad against the mane prequels and postquels of the Dune series. I will not join that. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Roald Andresen
3.0 out of 5 stars I wish Frank Hubert was still with us and writing ...
I wish Frank Hubert was still with us and writing these books... Frank, I believe, would've dived into the complex and sensitive issues that are covered in all the Dune books.
Published 2 months ago by Hector Gomez
1.0 out of 5 stars Another McDune... ruining Frank's legacy. New ...
Another McDune...ruining Frank's legacy.
New readers - stick to the originals and avoid Brian's work.
Published 2 months ago by EpochEclipse
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