Qty:1
  • List Price: $120.00
  • Save: $7.51 (6%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sister's Choice: Traditio... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book may have moderate creases and wear from reading. Item qualifies for ** FREE ** shipping and Amazon Prime programs!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sister's Choice: Traditions and Change in American Women's Writing (Clarendon Lectures) Paperback – November 28, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0198123835 ISBN-10: 0198123833 Edition: 1St Edition

Buy New
Price: $112.49
21 New from $4.98 60 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $12.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$112.49
$4.98 $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Clarendon Lectures
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1St Edition edition (November 28, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198123833
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198123835
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.7 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,387,250 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The diversity and contradictions of American women's writing and the feasibility of the concept of a monolithic national literature and identity are the prevailing themes underlying the eight chapters of this scholarly work. Showalter explores themes and analyzes specific works within the context of history, culture, tradition, and gender. Especially fascinating are Showalter's exploration of the history of American women writers' use of Miranda from Shakespeare's The Tempest as a metaphor for the woman artist or feminist intellectual and her comparison of the history of quiltmaking with the history of women's writing. In these insightful, thought-provoking, and lucid interpretations and commentaries, based on her Clarendon Lectures and previous writings, Showalter aptly incorporates her well-versed background on English and American writing while covering a diversity of American women writers from the 1650s to the 1990s.
- Jeris Cassel, Rutgers Univ. Libs., New Brunswick,
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

The title of this collection of essays (some delivered as lectures at Oxford in 1989) refers to a quilting pattern--the image, as Showalter (English/Princeton; Sexual Anarchy, 1990, etc.) explains, that best describes women's literature in America: its communal and ritual nature, its continuity, its diversity, its history as a domestic art that lapsed into disrepute before being resurrected into a high art in the 60's. Showalter's dual preoccupation with the role of women writers and the special identity of American literature appears in the first essay, ``Miranda's Story,'' describing the way various American subcultures have appropriated The Tempest--the role of Miranda, the Dark Lady, Shakespeare's sister--as played by American women, the prototype being Margaret Fuller. In successive chapters on Alcott's Little Women, Chopin's The Awakening, and Wharton's The House of Mirth, Showalter identifies the distinctive voices, values, preoccupations, ``hybridity'' of American women's writing that makes any question of being Shakespeare's sister irrelevant. And in an astute chapter on what she calls ``women's gothic,'' she further explores the contributions of women writers to the dominant male culture. Even in her chapter on the lost generation of women writers of the 20's--poets such as Amy Lowell, Sara Teasdale, and Elinor Wylie, and Afro-Americans such as Zora Neale Hurston--she finds, in spite of the exclusion, victimization, and repression, a ``literary history of female mastery and growth.'' Persuasive, ranging, perceptive, unpolemical, Showalter here offers a splendid example of humanistic writing, of her own ``female mastery and growth,'' a genuine contribution to contemporary thinking about women's literature. Her flaw: excessive quoting of scholars who don't write as well as she does, illustrating merely that she has done her homework. (Photographs of quilts.) -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "cab33" on May 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a grad student in Folklore and Folklife, I discovered this book during a research project on community cookbooks, of all things, and found its interpretations of literature relating to quilts applicable to my concentration in needlework. Without a background in literature, I was eager to read some of the pieces discussed in the various chapters, particularly "A Jury of her Peers." The book is written in a style that is appropriate for a general audience, and would be a wonderful addition to the library of anyone interested in American literature, women's studies, or material culture. I was so constantly fighting over the book by recalling it from other students through the University's library that I've decided to invest in my own copy and stop hogging the library's copy. It will definitely be used plenty in my academic program.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Justin Reilly, esq. on February 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
I wouldn't believe anything this charlatan has written. This is the same woman who wrote Hystories, in which claimed ME/CFIDS was hysteria like people who claimed they were abducted by aliens. There are over 5,000 articles in peer reviewed scientific journals showing frank biological pathology.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again