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Comment: Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
Date of Publication: 1998
Binding: hardcover
Edition:
Condition: Good
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Sisters in Sorrow: Voices of Care in the Holocaust Hardcover – June, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-0890968109 ISBN-10: 0890968101 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Texas a & M Univ Pr; 1st edition (June 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890968101
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890968109
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,191,499 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This muddled examination of women's experiences in the Holocaust bases itself upon the psychologist Carol Gilligan's view that "women not only define themselves in a context of human relationship but also judge themselves in terms of their ability to care"Abut it fails to make a convincing case that women experienced the Holocaust differently than men. After a fascinating first chapter titled "Medical Paradox" that touches on some of the issues that doctors and nurses in the camps and ghettos faced, the book tells its story through the voices of the women themselves. Readers who make their way through a narrative that was questionably cobbled togetherAeach chapter is a first-person account that the authors wove together out of multiple interviews with a subjectAwill learn more about the harrowing texture of everyday life during the attempted Nazi genocide of the Jews. In at least one camp, for example, doctors simply performed an abortion on every woman who came in pregnant. The ingenuity of some of the female physicians and nurses recorded here is impressive, but the book all too often veers away from the experiences of female "caregivers" to detail camp and ghetto experiences that are similar to what has been written about before. This book hints at an interesting subject that deserves more thorough treatment. 14 b&w photos.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

In the Nazi labor and death camps, Jewish women health workers were used to provide rudimentary medical care. The contradictions of their labors were all too apparent: people they might save from death still faced death. Yet camp inmates knew that if they couldn't work they would be put to death immediately, and the health workers did what they could to tend wounds, ward off epidemics, and, surreptitiously if grimly, abort fetuses so that the mothers might live. The health workers often functioned without the basic implements of medical care, deceiving their Nazi overseers whenever possible to get supplies. Compiled by Ritvo (Auburn Univ.) and Plotkin (Brookhaven Coll.), this important book lends an immediacy to this story by offering individual testimonies from these courageous people. It helps fill the gap in books on women in the Holocaust and is accessible to lay readers. Recommended for larger Holocaust study collections.APaul M. Kaplan, Lake Villa Dist., Lib., IL
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dusti M. Martin on February 8, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Kudos to Dr. Diane Plotkin for her thorough research into the lives of the women featured in this book. Her attention to detail helps transport us to the various camps where we experience dehumanization and deprivation. Through it all, however, it is interesting to see the various ways these women nurtured and tried to protect one another. This is a "must-read" book because it clearly illustrates the general differences in the ways men and women coped with, and adapted to, life in the concentration camps.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By pjo4556@aol.com on June 8, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book was a difficult endeavor, as one never wants to face the potential raw ugliness of mankind. However, the voices of these women are invaluable in helping the world to remember a time which must never be forgotten.
As a young woman (34 years old) and a mother of three (which qualifies me as a caregiver, I guess), my heart went out to these brave women, struggling to impart some small measure of kindness or at least relief of suffering to their fellow prisoners. Women and children are seemingly the most vulnerable when society engages in chaos, but the women caregivers chronicled in this book were apparently among the most intrepid of all. I believe they gathered strength from the acts of focusing on giving aid to others in the most desperate of circumstances. Anyone who is interested in what the human spirit can endure, and indeed, overcome, should read this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
It was hard to put this book down once I started it. Although the women portrayed faced a living hell all around them, the authors elicit the courage and determination each women had to continue the daily existence in the camps. And that is what is so powerful; the daily horrors which become the backdrop for extermination are also part of the reason that each was able to define for herself a path through death.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 19, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is novel in its approach and subject matter. Women in the Holocaust, and their triumphs, courage, and resourcefullness has been ignored before now. The stories are personal and engaging. I would put it in the top-ten must reads of Holocaust literature.
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