Six Great Ideas and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $1.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Six Great Ideas has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Six Great Ideas Paperback – December 1, 1997


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.29
$7.95 $0.01
Audio, Cassette
"Please retry"
$35.00
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$7.00

Frequently Bought Together

Six Great Ideas + A History of Knowledge: Past, Present, and Future
Price for both: $29.08

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (December 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068482681X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684826813
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #646,960 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Mortimer J. Adler was Chairman of the Board of the Encyclopedia Britannica, Director of the Institute for Philosophical Research, Honorary Trustee of the Aspen Institute, and authored more than fifty books. He died in 2001.

More About the Author

Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 - June 28, 2001) was an American philosopher, educator, and popular author. As a philosopher he worked within the Aristotelian and Thomistic traditions. He lived for the longest stretches in New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, and San Mateo. He worked for Columbia University, the University of Chicago, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Adler's own Institute for Philosophical Research. Adler was married twice and had four children.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on October 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
The philosophical divide in our culture has never been so apparent as simply reading the reviews of this book. Some fault Adler for references to ethics - as if morality had no place in philosophical thought. Others fault him for using common sense (as if that were a crime) and speaking in everyday language. Others thought he was grand because he is a deist.
Adler has written other books, better books, but one thing I like about all his books is their knack for inviting cogent comment and discussion. If only for that reason, they are important works that should be at least perused. Adler has offered radical plans for education and educators - a concrete program few have tried. The heart of this program is getting children to think, challenging their common assumptions and making them think why they think the way they do.
But to Adler this does not mean imbuing them with a political revolutionary zeal for "change". It means questioning their assumptions and defining what is important. With that in mind he wrote "Six Great Ideas", some of which are interrelated. To some, these ideas are dated but what he makes clear is that all six of these are universals and, because of their relationship to people, always will be.
For a better discussion of ideas get his 101 Great Ideas.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on October 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
No clearer indication of the philosophical divide in this nation can be seen than by reading the reviews in Amazon of the works of Mortimer Adler. One group of reviewers are geniunely concerned that he has a Western orientation, that he defends such ideas as democracy and capitalism, that he seems to speak for common sense, tradition and classical liberalism. There is another group that supports him wholeheartedly because of these very views and his sympathetic voice toward religion.
TEN PHILOSOPHICAL MISTAKES is an exploration of notions that he considers small mistakes that occurred in the past. The effect of these mistakes is compounded over time until they produce a difference in the way we view ourselves and our reality. He explores each of these mistakes in detail.
Guiding Adler's thinking is a reliance on the works of Aristotle and a look at both Greek and classical European methods of learning and teaching. Also important is his view of humans as rational animals who differ from other animals - not in degree but in kind.
He has made radical proposals for education and reintroducing thinking to the classroom. This is done not through a predictable "challenge to the system" but through the Socratic method. Ironically, this method was widely used in the Arab world at the height of its power before being subsumed by theocratic stipulations. This is a good book, not flawless, but one that is well worth five stars.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 37 people found the following review helpful By phsin@umich.edu on April 6, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book changed my life. Many people nowadays think that philosophy is an ivory tower excercise. It is not. And it is not impractical. This book had a profound impact on my thinking. It is very reasonable philosophy that led me to hunger for the nobler things in life. I highly suggest this book, especially to those who have never learned philosophy or have only learned philosophy from rationalists on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on May 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
Adler is great at relaying difficult philosophical truths to contemporary audiences with little to no background in philosophy. The philosophical positions accurately put forth in this book are those of Aristotle and the classical realist tradition. A truly valuable and important work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 17, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book was assigned to me in college (1995), and I concider it the most valuable book I've have ever purchased. The six ideas have proved to be an excellent philosophical base from which sound conclusions can be made regarding today's confusing, and sometimes convoluted, issues. Alder's six ideas have changed the way I view every aspect of my life. This is a "must read" text! P.S. This book is not offensive to those of us who have faith or believe in God.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David W. Edsall on June 2, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
How can you vote in the best interest of the country if you don't understand what is true, what is a lie or what is untrue (those are not the same) Were Powels UN statements lies or untrue? Were those calling Powel and Bush liars, themselves liars? How can you vote for the best candidate if you don't understand good from evil from bad? How can you be a good citizen and apply justice, liberty, and equality in your daily living if you can't explain those ideas. What is the pursuit of happiness? These ideas are what America is supposed to be about but if you don't understand these ideas how can you make sure we are on the right track or not.

Adler is one of there great minds and writers of the last century. His easy to read and precisely worded books will teach you how to think for your self and judge others and live a good life so that you will be happy. If you can't distinguish wants from needs you will be more stressed by following a chaotic (maybe pleasurable) path in your life but will never be happy and content. This is the best book to start with. Then move on to Philosophical Mistakes, How to Read, Aristotle Made Easy, and most importantly the syntopticon. If you take this book to heart and live by it, it will change your life and will help you see who is fair and balanced and who is lying to you to advance their misguided (at best) agenda. It will give you the best chance for happiness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?