Customer Reviews


218 Reviews
5 star:
 (105)
4 star:
 (75)
3 star:
 (28)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Werewolf Novel!!
I love werewolf books. I loved this one, go figure, but I also loved that it was completely different from other YA paranormal books I have read about wolves. This took on a completely different creation story. It's harder to find, where werewolves are the evil creatures in books, so I loved this. I also loved that there was hope for Rylie. That her fate wasn't...
Published on April 28, 2011 by Aimee

versus
70 of 81 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Werewolf Girl, Interrupted
Packed off to summer camp while her parents get divorced, Rylie is determined to see it through and hope for the best- until that one night where it all changes and she's attacked by something she can't identify. Almost immediately she notices herself changing both physically and psychologically, yet as understanding blooms she doesn't understand how she survived the...
Published on February 7, 2012 by John Green


‹ Previous | 1 222 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Werewolf Novel!!, April 28, 2011
By 
Aimee "Coffee Table Reviews" (GREEN RIVER, WY, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
I love werewolf books. I loved this one, go figure, but I also loved that it was completely different from other YA paranormal books I have read about wolves. This took on a completely different creation story. It's harder to find, where werewolves are the evil creatures in books, so I loved this. I also loved that there was hope for Rylie. That her fate wasn't fixed.

This had some romance to it, not enough to overpower the paranormal mystery that is going on, but enough to balance out some of the harsher realities in the book. I loved the narration. Rylie was such a great character to follow as I got to see her change from who she was to what she could be.

This was a fantastic werewolf tale from debut author SM Reine. I am excited to continue the series and it shows great promise. Packed with tons of adventure, teen angst, touch of romance and twisted with paranormal, it makes for a perfect read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


70 of 81 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Werewolf Girl, Interrupted, February 7, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
Packed off to summer camp while her parents get divorced, Rylie is determined to see it through and hope for the best- until that one night where it all changes and she's attacked by something she can't identify. Almost immediately she notices herself changing both physically and psychologically, yet as understanding blooms she doesn't understand how she survived the attack. An enigmatic boy at the camp, Seth, has the answers she seeks and offers to help her, but as the summer wanes and the wolf in her grows stronger, Rylie fights to maintain her self-control and hopes for a cure even as she searches for clues about the one who did this to her.

What's Good: The premise is intriguing- going from being a nobody to a monster and all things that happen in between. Rylie's teen angsting about her parent's divorce is what you'd expect. There's also some good secondary characters- I especially liked Louise, one of the camp counselors. I actually had more empathy for her than Rylie.

What's Bad: The MarySue/Speshul Snoflakiness of it all. At the wise old age of fifteen Rylie wants nothing more than to spend the summer in the art district of this nameless city sipping chai tea in coffee shops while reading and going to exhibits and summer festivals, just like the typical teenage girl she's supposed to be. Oh, and she doesn't have any female friends because they're too catty yet wonders if all her male buddies' girlfriends hate her because she's blonde and slender. Any of this sounding familiar, yet?

For someone who's life's been destroyed by becoming a legendary monster, Rylie's pretty blasé about it. It's all "Dear Diary: Mean girls at camp are bothering me... met a cute boy by the lake... I'm a werewolf now." Her biggest concern about it is her distaste for her insatiable cravings for meat, what with being a vegetarian. At least until the fateful night when she rips apart a fawn, then she has an emotional breakdown. She's actually more upset about eating Bambi than becoming a rampaging monster that'll want to slaughter things to begin with. But hey, we got veggie vampires nowadays so why not tofu werewolves? Plus the mysterious yet cute boy she meets knows a whole lot about what's happening to her yet she barely bothers to ask him more than a couple of questions at a time. And some of his answers don't make a lot of sense. When Rylie asks Seth what's happening to her, he responds, "The new & full moons are different. You change on the new moon because it makes the human weak, so the wolf emerges. On the full moon the wolf becomes strong. It dominates you." You kinda see what the author's trying to get at, but it doesn't come across very well. Like a friend of mine said: Heads, I win; Tails, you lose.

The mystery of the identities of the werewolves attacking the camp is nothing special. One's a bit of a surprise and the other one isn't, but what makes it bad is the ham-handedness of the whole situation. Rylie has questions (naturally) and is clearly a danger to herself and everyone else during her furry nights, yet the alpha wolf who bit her lets her flounder until the climax of the story. And their actions and motives are ridiculous- without going too far into it, how does this individual expect to keep the massacre of an entire summer camp secret? The second person's identity discloses more ridiculous plot holes: they've been a werewolf for a year yet apparently still lives in the city. Clearly this person was brought into the fold immediately but again, why wasn't Rylie? And how has this person been managing on their wild nights and why can't Rylie do the same?

And speaking of 'the city'... Wondering why I called it that? Because everyone in the book does. Rylie, Louise, Cassidy, Amber- everyone comes from 'the city'. The summer camp has a name, the mountain is located on has a name as do the river and lake around the camp, but the city, county and state they're all in don't, even though 'the city' has a North End and East Side with an art district.

The final showdown is a cartoon. Werewolves in human form can heal at an amazing rate- Rylie breaks her ankle yet it's well enough in a matter of moments for her to run full tilt along a mountain trail. Somehow none of this translates onto any other werewolves but her: in the final battle Rylie gets her throat ripped out but can keep on fighting since she's young and strong, which enables her to eviscerate her opponent- alpha were described as the size of a horse- to the point that he's on the verge of bleeding out. Really.

What's Left: There's flashes of good storytelling, especially the little insights into Rylie psyche before and after her transformations, but they're scattered and almost lost in all the MarySue-ism and silliness. Too many parts of the story feel slapped together because too much space is wasted showing how speshul Rylie is to help justify her being chosen becoming a werewolf in the first place. Which didn't make any sense, either.

A couple of minor twists in the story will keep you entertained but all the fudging to keep our girl the centerpiece of the story drags it all down.

The romance between Rylie and Seth is forced. Rylie knows he knows more than he's letting on yet she never asks him more than a couple of questions at a time- she's too preoccupied with flirting with him to remember why they're sneaking her away from camp during full moons.

There's a good premise here but it's bogged down by some absolute nonsense. The old adage of keeping it simple applies here, and simply put the series needs to be what it says it is: the story of a girl who gets turned into a werewolf.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fresh an unique book!, April 29, 2011
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
I got this book as an ebook ARC.

Story:

Being stuck between divorcing parents isn't fun, but Rylie sure would prefer that instead of the summer camp she's sent to. Little did she know, that the camp would change her life forever.

Rylie is being picked on by her cabin mates, and one night she escapes to the woods, wishing to get away. She blacks out, not remembering much, but wakes up in her own cot, back in the camp. Soon she realises something has changed, and she doesn't know what to make out of it.

When Seth gets in contact with Rylie, she learns she was attacked by a werewolf. With the help of her new friend Rylie tries to cope with the changes she's gradually going through, and desperately tries to figure out a cure. In three months she would be real werewolf.

Writing:

Six Moon Summer has a pleasant flow in it, and the language is well fit for the YA audience.

The book is first tuned with some insight what will happen at the end of the book, and it sets a dooming atmosphere for the tale. I don't know why, but I had kind of a twin-peaksy feeling while reading because of it (and it's a good thing).

There are some inconsistencies in the book, some regarding Rylie and her dad, some about the cure. Hard to get into details without being too specific. Nothing major though, so they wont affect your reading experience too much.

I give Reine extra credit about how vivid the scenes with Rylie in her wolf form were. I loved those parts. I suspect Reine has first-hand experience about being a werewolf.

Main character:

I did not like Rylie, but she is very real. I think teenagers can relate to her more, but at times I just wanted to smack her out of it. Your parents are divorcing, big deal, get over it already! She's not even that close with her mother, nor does she seem to like her, so why does she care they're having a divorce? Instead she chooses to be a little bastard and ends up ruining a potentially great experience.

But as I said, as much as she annoyed me, I thought she was very realistic. As a teenager the world revolves around you and everything that happens is bigger than life, and everyone is there ruining it for you. I liked Rylie more and more, when the wolf side started to affect her.

As a character Rylie is interesting to get to know. You'd think that when you don't like a character, you don't really want to read about her, but this was different. It was obvious Rylie was changing and I as a reader got to be part of it. It was fascinating, and now I have a love/hate relationship towards her. Anyway it's lovely to see a character evolving through the story.

Secondary characters:

The other characters are quite dim in the book. Even Seth - who's the biggest secondary character - comes off a bit flat, though I liked what Reine had done with him otherwise. The revelation about Seth came to me as a surprise, and looking back I could just think "duh, I should have guessed".

Also the bullies were quite one-dimensional, and I wish Reine would have done something more with them. Sure they picked on Rylie, but that was about it.

I would have loved to get to know more about Cassidy. She and Rylie barely talk to each other though, so now she was just some weird hang-around and filler, when she could've been so much more.

We don't see much of Rylie's parents, but I seriously doubt their affection towards their daughter. Rylie loses all her things during the werewolf attack, including her asthma pipe, and they don't get it sorted out immediately? Sure they have the divorce going on, but a girl with asthma in the middle of the woods, it's about life and death there, so get that asthma pipe to her!

The antagonist was easy to guess, but I had a hard time figuring out what the werewolf was trying to do while at human form, since the behaviour was quite weird at times and somewhat conflicting with the agenda.

From the minor characters Louise was my favourite, and I felt for her. The author took time to introduce her to us properly, so it feels Louise actually counts in the book, and at least I cared what would happen to her.

Reine is otherwise a strong, good writer, but I think the minor characters are a bit of a struggle for her.

Overall:

My experiences with werewolf books are minimal, but I think it usually goes that the werewolf is either a monster or the hot love interest. I love that Reine chose to make her protagonist - Rylie - the howling beast instead. Reine has also made her own rules about the werewolf mythology; it's unique and refreshing.

This is a great book for all you YA lovers, who are looking for something totally new to read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book from S.M. Reine!, April 29, 2011
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
First sentence: The moon rose high in the sky.

In the beginning of the book author gives a very captivating prelude, which draws a nice picture of what is going to happen in the coming chapters. But you never realize that there will be lot of twists and turns before you finish reading Six Moon Summer.

Meet Rylie, a girl whose parents are divorcing and who is sent to summer camp for three months. Rylie dislikes everything about the camp: the food, the people, hiking and she misses her city a lot. She feels misplaced and outsider and she would rather hide herself in the cabin on her cot instead of participating what the camp has to offer.

The summer camp meets her with some hostility, girls whom she shares the cabin with start openly comment her and bullying her. After the heartbreaking scene, where other girls are going through Rylie's things and reading her diary, Rylie runs off to the forest, not realizing what danger is waiting for her. Danger that will change her life completely.

What I liked about the Six Moon Summer

I loved the surroundings and setting that author created for the book - the Camp Silver Brook. Usually there are only two types of opinions about summer camps and this was also mirrored in the book - either you love it or you hate it. Rylie's view on the camp was very clear in the beginning of the book, but it changes throughout the book, Rylie learns to love the opportunities that he camp offered to her after she started changing. I think the author does a wonderful job describing the Camp Silver Brook, otherwise typical summer camp for young people. The way author described the summer camp - it made me wish to visit the place!

The plot itself was captivating, as said; there were some interesting twists and turns in the book. First you find yourself in the summer camp, then a brief visit to the city where Rylie is from, then back to the camp. There were several events and topics, what kept me reading Six Moon Summer and made it an interesting read: divorce in the family, bullying people who are different among the teens, paranormal aspects of the book, death in the family and last, but not least the characters.

S.M. Reine did an excellent job with her female characters. Rylie was well thought through, a teen girl who felt totally out of space and room; Amber was a typical teenager, who thought herself being better than others; I absolutely adored Louisa, Rylie's counselor in the camp; Cassidy with her rebellion heart. All that made the female characters strong, interesting and easy to associate with. The male characters of the book were weaker in my opinion, but Rylie's dad was very sympathetic, a dad which everyone would love to have.

What I think author can improve.

There were couple of scenes in the book, where I found the actions of the characters little farfetched. For example I found the scene where Seth starts to tie Rylie up before her change too strange. It was a tiny bit too much for YA book in my opinion. I understood the necessity of that, but still it felt awkward to me.

The second episode what felt alien to me was the aggressiveness in Rylie which she expressed when she started to change into werewolf. It happened too fast and it did not suite to Rylie as a character.

Seth was a mystery to me. I really liked him in the book, but there was something in him, that seemed flat. I needed more background information about him than I got from the first book. He was not captivating enough. He was nice, good looking, helpful, mysterious - he could really be lovable character, but what I missed was a spark, a fire inside him.

Generally speaking I think Six Moon Summer was a very good book and an interesting start for series and I will be looking forward to reading the sequels. S.M. Reine's book is definitely worth of reading.

4 stars out of 5.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Development, June 14, 2011
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
There was so much potential in this book but I felt like it fell flat in many places. To me, the first half was very rushed. We get thrown straight into the deep end with very well done action scenes. My problem was that these scenes started so early in the story, that I had developed no connection to the main character, Rylie. She was whiny and to be honest, I didn't like her at all. Watching her deal with the mean girls at camp and her parents made me think, `Geez, shut up and get over it already.' Bad stuff happens. Deal. Yeah... I was not impressed at first.

Another problem I had was the undercurrent of `Werewolves... seriously?!' This is entirely my own prejudice against the overabundance of werewolf books but there were definitely some of those eye-rolling cliches thrown in.

So now you are wondering, if you disliked the book so much, why the heck are you giving it 2 1/2 Stars?! The answer is: first half = 2, second half = 3 1/2, and generally excellent character and plot development rack up give it some extra oomph. While the first half fell flat, the second half, having had some time to get to know Rylie and Seth and the urge to slap our protagonist having faded with her angst, was pretty gosh darned good. Thinking about it now, it sort of felt like I was reading two separate books.

We get some serious personality development happening and, despite the residue of angsty misery, Rylie becomes very interesting. The mystery and drama picks up and the entire book becomes a million times better. Even the whole werewolf idea, which is essentially the basis of the entire story, becomes highly intriguing! It was just different enough, with an interesting twist. This really saved it for me and now I'm glad that I got a chance to read Six Moon Summer.

Six Moon Summer is the first in a series (Seasons of the Moon) and with a serious cliff hanger ending, I'm now quite committed to finding out what happens next. Would I recommend it? Yes. To fans of werewolves and teen drama, definitely. To those who like a little mystery thrown in with their anstgy wolves, why not? Give it a shot, I'm interested to see what you think!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Different take on werewolves..., May 30, 2011
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
I will put this out there first...this was my first "werewolf" novel. I've read books about fairies, vampires, ghosts, elves but not a book that centered around werewolves. I was unsure what to expect. With that said it was definitely unexpected.

First off, Rylie, the main character, is bratty and self-centered and not very likeable. However, by the end of the book she is a much better person. I liked to see this change in her. By the last couple of chapters I was really rooting for her.

We meet several supporting characters but most seem kind of disconnected and unlikeable. Louise, the counselor at camp, was my favorite character by far. She was caring and thoughtful but even at times she seemed to be a different person. Even Seth, Rylie's love interest. He wants to help her through her changes but there is something always off about him, I didn't know if I should like him or not.

For me this story bordered more on low-grade horror than YA paranormal. Perhaps because this is my first book centered on werewolves I was a bit more taken by surprise at the turn of events or perhaps because in this book, werewolves are really the bad guys but this was not what I was expecting.

If you are into werewolves and are looking for something a bit different this is the book for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome book by an awesome writer, April 30, 2011
By 
Erin Conroy (Warren, MI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
I was lucky to read Six Moon Summer prior to release and let me tell you, it is a great book. It's about this teenager, Rylie (I just love that name!), who is sent to summer camp by her soon-to-be divorced parents. She's immediately singled out, made fun of, and bullied by he other campers, leaving her isolated and angry and confused. She writes in a journal, which is really cool. It brought up memories of my own journal-writing days.

Rylie is attacked the night of the full moon and awakens with no memory of what happened, just healing claw marks on her. She is very confused and scared. She meets Seth, from the boy's camp nearby, and they become friends...and more. Rylie learns about what has happened to her and she and Seth grow closer. She's forced to make some difficult decisions and comes out of it stronger than before. I'm not giving spoilers, but I will tell you this: the ending will surprise and amaze you. Very nicely done.

What I love about Six Moon Summer is how the author handled the werewolf mythos. It's not totally the standard mythos (although getting bitten does transfer what they call "the curse"); instead, it's slightly different and twisted around. The creation myths are cool, too. The neatest thing is how one turns into a werewolf. It's done incrementally and it involves a choice on the part of the afflicted. It's really neat and unique.

Another thing I enjoyed was Rylie's relationship with Seth. And Seth himself. He's got a wealth of knowledge about werewolves and he helps Rylie and teaches her things. Towards the end we find out a bit more about Seth and his connection to werewolves -- it will surprise you.

I like the fact that it is a coming-of-age story. Rylie is forced to grow up and grow strong to handle what is next. That's her only option. And she chooses well in my opinion.

My only real complaint (if you could call it that) is the very end. Obviously, this is book 1 in a series (Seasons of the Moon -- it sounds cool, doesn't it?) but I felt there needed to be a bit more closure for Rylie. But this didn't tarnish my enjoyment or make me not like the book. On the contrary. I loved the book and want more. You hear that, Sara? I want more, dammit!

So, if you like werewolf stories and coming-of-age stories, and a twisty plot and surprise ending, go forth and get a copy of Six Moon Summer. You'll be so glad you did.

Oh, and one more thing: I have read A LOT of fantasy over the years and occasionally I can predict what the ending will be. Well, with Six Moon Summer, I had no friggin clue. Not even a seedling of an idea. And that's good because it kept me so engaged, wanting to find out more, and it was so original that it blew me away. So, this is not your typical fantasy book. It's really different and really cool.

And I love the name Rylie. Did I mention that?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Read!, April 29, 2011
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
Six Moon Summer had me from the very beginning.

Riley is a girl who gets shipped off to camp for the summer to save her from the trauma of a messy divorce between her parents.

She immediately finds that she doesn't fit in with the rest of the campers and after a brutal night of dealing with her peers, she takes off.

Something terrible happens, but she has no recollection of what. Strange things start to happen to her that she can't explain, at least until a sexy boy comes to her rescue.

I loved that the werewolf in this story was actually the heroine. It was refreshing to see a girl in this kind of a roll for a change.

The story was exciting and fun to read. I would love to see what happens with Riley and Seth in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unlikable heroine, July 11, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (#1) (Seasons of the Moon) (Kindle Edition)
Kylie just isn't very likable. She doesn't have any girlfriends "since all the girls she knew were catty and stupid." Attending summer camp, she blatantly snubs everyone, then feels hurt when they retaliate. I want someone to root for, to identify with, someone I believe is good even if she is doing something wrong. Perhaps if the author had hinted that the girl knew she was behaving like a brat, I would have given her a chance to show me she was a better person. As it stands, however I couldn't even skim my way to the end of this one. Had to quit on it and look for something better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Ideas but Main Character Ruined It For Me, February 4, 2013
By 
Kaity (Portland, ME USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Six Moon Summer (Paperback)
I was really worried right from the start of Six Moon Summer. Rylie is staying at a three month long summer camp where she has no friends and has no interest in making any. In general I hate boarding school stories because of how much drama and cattiness they breed; summer camp has the same feel as a boarding school. There's enough angst in real life, I don't have much interest in reading about it in depth. That said, the story started off with me worrying and finding it angsty in another way. I didn't know Rylie well enough to like her but I felt intense pity for her in the beginning. Rylie's parents are in the midst of a divorce and my impression is they want her at camp to keep her out of the way not to spare her any of the ugliness.

"Rylie considered the words with a frown. Camp could be interesting, I guess. Maybe if I see it as a learning thing instead of a punishment for the divorce...?"

At about a quarter of the way into Six Moon Summer, I still had no idea how I felt about the book up to that point. Rylie was... unlikable. I originally felt sorry for her and I understood where her anger and hostility came from (her situation and the oncoming werewolfism). However, she was just as drama seeking and petty as the other campers that she hated. She was constantly nasty and feeling sorry for herself yet they were situations she'd gotten herself into. I found myself enjoying the idea of the book a lot but it wasn't going to be enough as the story continued.

"Why had Rylie, of all people, been bitten? She was going to become a wolf at the end of summer, and she hadn't done anything to deserve it."

"He nodded. "The library is in the back room. Kids aren't allowed."
"No wonder, if they've got stuff on werewolves," Rylie muttered. "How do we get in?""

I did a whole lot of my own suspension of disbelief in Six Moon Summer but was too farfetched. I love paranormal/fantasy so the werewolf aspect wasn't my issue. I had a problem with the counselors having secret werewolf books, Seth being the one to guide her and always showing up at exactly the right moment/knowing everything (some of the Seth stuff eventually gets explained but it doesn't change the fact that it was 100% ridiculous and unbelievable until you get to that point and Rylie eats it up), Rylie's constant rule breaking and general obnoxiousness not getting her kicked out or some sort of real punishment until far down the line... I couldn't immerse myself into a novel when I don't find anything believable.

I was not a fan of how werewolves were tackled in this book. I like books where werewolves are the dark heroes typically, but them being evil is okay too. In Six Moon Summer they aren't really either... they're rabid animals. This is very much a personal preference thing. Reading a different take on werewolves was refreshing and interesting but it wasn't something that I enjoyed.

Rylie was horribly whiny, constantly feeling sorry for herself when she was the cause of her problems, and frankly she wasn't a nice person. I don't see how any of her 'friends' liked her. She claims Cassidy was a close enough friend to risk getting into trouble by sneaking her out yet all I saw was her avoid Cassidy in a mean way and use her.

""That's not fair!" Rylie complained. She never got to see Seth unless something was wrong. She wanted one chance to have fun before the summer ended. Her chin quivered as she tried not to cry. "Everyone else gets to go!""
*She stole the counselors' car which resulted in privileges being taken away*

I actually liked the ending despite its bittersweet quality. I will probably give the next book in the series a try before I decide whether to continue on or give up.

This review was a little harsher than I intended it to be. I definitely didn't hate the book but Rylie pressed every button I have and apparently I had a lot to say about that. I would recommend Six Moon Summer to readers who like lots of action and can forgive a whiny heroine. Reine kept the book fast paced with very few quiet moments.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 222 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.