Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $5.13 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Just a few markings. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Six Plays by Lillian Hellman Paperback – October 12, 1979


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.82
$7.61 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Six Plays by Lillian Hellman + Four Plays: Come Back Little Sheba; Picnic; Bus Stop; The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (Black Cat Books) + Waiting for Lefty and Other Plays
Price for all three: $37.40

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (October 12, 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394741129
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394741123
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 5.1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

These six plays span nearly twenty years of theatre and display the range of Lillian Hellman's dramatic gifts. The Children's Hour (1934), her first play, was considered shocking at the time; it concerns the devastating effects of a child's malicious charge of lesbianism against two of her teachers. Days to Come (1936) is about the tragic consequences of strike-breaking in a small Midwestern community. The Little Foxes (1939) and Another Part of the Forest (1946) together constitute a chilling study of the financial and psychological conflicts within the Hubbards, a wealthy and rapacious Southern family. Watch on the Rhine (1941), the story of how fascism affects an American family and the refugees they harbor, won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. The Autumn Garden (1951) is a poignant yet humorous drama set at a summer resort near New Orleans.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Memorable characters, sad and bitter both, in each piece.
JR
I orginally bought this just to read "The Children's Hour"; however, I truly enjoyed reading all six plays.
Katherine M. Meadows
A perfect addition to the script library, this collection has several harder to find Hellman plays.
Kimberly Huff

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Woodland on April 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
At present, it seems the Lillian Hellman's life has eclipsed her career as a playwright. Her tumultuous affair with mystery writer Dashiell Hammett and her refusal to testify before the House Un-American Affairs Committee are widely-known. Her memoir of a humanitiarian errard during World War II (filmed as the movie "Julia") spawned a great debate on the trustworthiness of her memory.
Yet we hear much less about her plays, six of which are collected in this volume. Perhaps the best known are "The Little Foxes" (in which Tallulah Bankhead starred on Broadway, with Bette Davis taking over the lead in the 1941 movie) and "The Children's Hour" (made into a 1961 film starring Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine). "The Little Foxes" and its prequel "Another Part of the Forest" trace the financial intrigues and infighting of an Alabama family at the turn of the century. Their struggles reflect the social issues facing the post-bellum South; more importantly their scheming and bask-stabbing are great fun. "The Children's Hour" shocked audiences with its frank portrayal (for 1934) of allegations of lesbianism in a girls' boarding school. (In fact, the 1936 film of the play, "These Three" substituted a heterosexual scandal.) Yet Hellman's depiction of the effects of gossip (and what we would today term "homosexual panic') still has the ring of authenticity.
A new discovery for me was the play "Watch on the Rhine," first produced in 1941. The standard description of this play as a portrayal of the effects of fascism on an American family, though true enough, may give a false impression. It's not a preachy play, but almost a comedy of manners, pitting some quaint Europeans against a "normal" American family.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
It's unclear to me how such wonderful plays could have escaped my reading for this long.

A casual conversation led me to get this book in order to read the emotionally jarring "The Children's Hour." But that ended up only being the icing on the cake. Every one of the plays in this book display Hellman's mastery of dramatic form, story development, and the anti-climax.

She is direct and yet somehow understated. It's a wonder to me that her name is not mentioned more often in the context it deserves, as a great American playwright. I believe those who see her in the shadow of other playwrights should rethink their comparisons. Hellman stands on her own and deserves careful consideration. In any event, I think everone should read these plays and decide for themselves.

Of particular interest to me is the play "Days to Come." On the surface it tells the story of a small town dealing with the pressures of Organized Labor and Organized Crime. But there is a subtext of human turmoil that is executed expertly. The second act is particularly sharp, with great dialogue that challenges you to read between the lines. While the complexity and number of character might make this a tough production for a small independant playhouse, there is much in her writing to be admired.

I'm glad I took the opportunity to read what I believe to be gems in the rough. I hope more people will do the same.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reading plays may not be for everyone. But Lillian's works are well worth trying. I think anyone would enjoy them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Lisa Bodden on January 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this just for The Children's Hour, but was delighted by the rest of the plays. She was a wonderful playwright and storyteller.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Frank L. Greenagel Jr. on December 16, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Little Foxes is clearly Hellman's masterpiece (though the other 5 plays that appear in this collection are fine). She wrote The Little Foxes in 1939 at the tail end of the depression. The play is set in the deep south in the spring of 1900. The action centers around the three Hubbard siblings, (Ben, Oscar & Regina), who are wealthy capitalists that are trying to bring a cotton mill to their town with the help of a Chicago entrepreneur (Marshall). Birdie is Oscar's wife, and she objects to the Hubbard's lifestyle (shooting animals for sport when blacks are starving, overcharging poor people to turn a huge profit) and their cruelty (she doesn't even like her son, who is also callous and cruel). The Hubbard's need money from Regina's husband, Horace, who is as principled as Birdie but also a lot more powerful and strong willed.
The Hubbard's are so greedy and rapacious that they turn on each other at times, trying to cut into each other's percentage of the deal. They also discuss how keep the lower class from uniting by catering to and playing up racism. It's a devastating critique of capitalism.

From Act II

Ben: Cheap? You'd think the Governor of a great state would make his price a little higher. From pride, know (Horace smiles. Ben smiles). Cheap wages. "What do you mean by cheap wages" I say to Marshall. "Less than Massachusetts," he says to me, "and that averages eight dollars a week," "Eight a week! By God," I tell him, "I'd work for eight dollars a week myself." Why, there ain't a mountain white or a town (black) but wouldn't give his right arm for three silver dollars a week, eh, Horace?
Horace: Sure. And they'll take less than that when you get around to paying them off against each other. You can save a little money that way, Ben.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?