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86 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book ever about the Kennedy assassination - bar none
As an American who believes in his heart that President Kennedy was assassinated as the result of a conspiracy, it pains me to see so many half-baked and flat-out irresponsible studies of the assassination. These run the gamut from the ridiculous defenses of the Warren Report (Gerald Posner, in particular) to the most outlandish conspiracy books hawking absolutely...
Published on January 22, 2005 by Michael K. Beusch

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Six Seconds in Dallas: Best JFK Book to start research
Six Seconds in Dallas is a diamond in the rough for any JFK buff on the theory of the Assasination.

Especially since the era of the Book is within the
Lifetime of the statements of those who did witness Events surrounding
the JFK Assassination, and before the Cloud of DisInformation that has since followed.

The Author was also a Bona-fide...
Published 15 months ago by Surfs up Dude


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86 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book ever about the Kennedy assassination - bar none, January 22, 2005
By 
Michael K. Beusch (San Mateo, California United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
As an American who believes in his heart that President Kennedy was assassinated as the result of a conspiracy, it pains me to see so many half-baked and flat-out irresponsible studies of the assassination. These run the gamut from the ridiculous defenses of the Warren Report (Gerald Posner, in particular) to the most outlandish conspiracy books hawking absolutely ridiculous theories (James Fetzer's books claiming that the Zapruder film is a fake is the latest). Both the Warren Commission's defenders and the way-out conspiracy theorists do the search for the truth a great disservice. Both groups pick and choose whatever evidence suits their needs. Warren Commission apologists suspend the natural laws of forensics and physics and brand every anti-Commission witness as a nut and every conspiracy believer as a paranoid lunatic. The extreme conspiracy theorists see assassins in every photograph, including, they claim, James Milteer (a right wing activist of the day), Charles Harrelson, a professional hitman and the father of Cheers star Woody Harrelson, and even Watergate figure Howard Hunt.

Thankfully, in 1967, Josiah Thompson provided a study of the assassination which is, in my opinion, still the best book ever published about the assassination. Six Seconds in Dallas breaks down the evidence and, using a scientific approach to the investigation, shows conclusively that President Kennedy was fired upon by three assassins, not just Lee Harvey Oswald. Warren Commission proponents love to point to the fact that Governor John Connally defended the Warren Commission -- they just ignore the fact that the Governor testified that he was certain he was hit by a separate shot from the one that hit President Kennedy in the back. Using the Zapruder film, however, Thompson pinpoints the exact moment when Connally was shot, showing conclusively that he and the President were struck by separate shots. Using the FBI tests of Lee Harvey Oswald's rifle, he shows conclusively that Oswald could not have possibly shot Kennedy in the back, recycled the rifle and then shot Connally. Therefore there was another shooter.

Thompson also analyzes the much studied Moorman polaroid photograph. This is the photo that allegedly shows an assassin dressed as a Dallas Police officer (Badgeman) firing on JFK. However, using the testimony of a witness, S.M. Holland who saw a puff of smoke come from the grassy knoll, Thompson concludes that the shot to President Kennedy's head was actually fired to the left of where Badgeman stood. Thompson asked Holland to stand where the smoke came from. Sure enough, when the photo is blown up, what looks like the top of a man's head appears at that exact spot -- a shape that does not appear in Thompson's re-creation of the photo.

Those are just two of the investigative threads Thompson follows in Six Seconds in Dallas. No matter what part of the assassination he investigates, however, his conclusions come as the result of exhaustive investigation and scientific analysis. He even debunks some claims made by the more extreme conspiracy theorists, like the claim that a photo shows Oswald standing in the doorway of the Texas School Book Depository at the time of the shooting or that the Nix film shows an assassin firing from the top of a station wagon. Thompson does not make the wild claims of the irresponsible conspiracy books. He does not make a claim that he cannot back up with conclusive evidence. Had every book regarding the assassination been this thorough and responsible, Dan Rather, Peter Jennings, Arlen Specter, Gerald Posner and other defenders of the Warren Commission would have a much tougher time dimissing the conspiracy theorists.

A friend of mine once asked me, "Why are we still talking about Kennedy's assassination? It was a long time ago." This made me livid. If there was other assassin(s) who participated in the murder of John F. Kennedy, they must be identified and brought to justice -- whether it takes 40, 50, 60, even 100 years. The American electoral process is sacred. It's flawed, it's antiquated in many ways, but it expresses the will of the people to choose the person who will lead the country. That a select few who hate the person elected could subvert the will of the people and assassinate the President should be offensive to every American. We, as Americans, have the responsibility to seek the truth and do so responsibly, no matter what skeletons the truth might shake loose. The Warren Commission's defenders continue to stick their heads in the sand. The far-out conspiracy theorists hurt the cause, exploiting, in many cases, the murder of President Kennedy for attention or monetary gain. Josiah Thompson does neither -- he seeks the truth and so should we all.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The JFK Murder Mystery, July 2, 2008
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
Josiah Thompson studied at Oxford, Copenhagen, and Yale. He was an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Haverford College. He worked as a member of the 'LIFE' magazine team that investigated the JFK assassination using the photographs and movie films taken at that time. The purpose of this book is to use the available evidence to investigate the unsolved assassination. Critics of the Warren Report said it could not have happened that way (a lone gunman). This 1967 book uses the evidence to answer how it happened. Lawyer Vincent Salandria was the first to list the misrepresentations and contradictions in the Warren Report (p.viii).

Chapter 2 notes the differences among witnesses as to the number, direction, and quality of the shots heard. [Years later a discovered recording would present objective evidence.] If two shots were "bunched" there were two shooters. Chapter 3 explains why the first shot hit JFK in the back (p.35). The Bethesda autopsy said this had a downward trajectory of 45-60 degrees downward (p.41). Chapter 4 explains why the second shot hit Governor Connally (p.67). Chapter 5 tells about the third and fourth shots that hit JFK (p.87). A piece of skull was found 10 to 15 feet to the left of the car's path (p.100). This suggests a shot from the right front of the car (p.101). A neurosurgeon said the head injury was a tangential wound (p.106). Note the difference between the head wound observed at Parkland (p.107). And that at Bethesda (p.111). It is as if two different bodies were observed!

Who was that man with Secret Service credentials (p.125)? The bullet that struck Governor Connally likely came from the roof of the Dallas County Records Building (p.130). Two shots came from the School Book Depository (p.136). Pages 143-145 tell of the problems with the four shells found in the TBSD. There is a problem with CE 399 (p.147). What bullet was found in the hospital (p.156)? CE 399 could not have come from Kennedy or Connally (p.158). Chapter 8 has a reconstruction of the assassination: 4 shots, 3 shooters (p.178). Note the comments on page 190. The Warren Commission went wrong because of uncritical acceptance of the single bullet theory (p.196). [But if they said more than one assassin that would be proof of the conspiracy they said did not exist!] Pages 203-204 analyze the "ramshackle case". Experts said Connally was hit by "two different bullets" (p.206). The Warren Report was "hearsay and contradiction" (p.209). There was "contradictory evidence" buried in the Warren Report (p.213). Who was in the doorway (pp.226-227)? Who owned the jacket discarded by Tippit's assailant (p.229)? Did Oswald shoot the President (p.233)? That can't be proved or disproved.

Appendix D has a critique of the Autopsy by Cyril H. Wecht M.D., L.L.B. They did not use an experienced forensic pathologist as they had mistakes of procedure and technique. There was not mention of the adrenal glands, and a failure to adequately inspect the brain. The body was not X-rayed and the films inspected before the autopsy. The entrance wound in the back is substantially lower than the purported exit in the throat. Wecht does not agree with the essential findings of the Warren Report or the autopsy on which it was based (p.283). Another problem is CE 399.

In 1974 George O'Toole's book "The Assassination Tapes" provided the physical evidence to question Oswald's guilt. A Congressional committee concluded in two shooters. More books were published afterwards. The majority of Americans today do not believe the Warren Report.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bring this book back in print, August 20, 2004
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
With dozens upon dozens of far-fetched theories about the JFK assassination, this book above all others is the most sane, the most rational, and the most logical. Using eye- and ear-witness testimony, drawings made from stills of the Zapruder film (which may have been tampered with but is NOT a fabrication, puh-LEEZE, Mr. Fetzer!), and expert analysis, Josiah Thompson's SIX SECONDS IN DALLAS remains the best study of the assassination--and the best proof of a conspiracy--to have emerged from the 60s, or any other decade for that matter.

Don't look for Cuban-exile/CIA/FBI/KGB/Vinnie-Goombatza-crime-family conspiracy theories here. This book is not interested in the whodunnit aspect of the case. It is solely interested in those moments--those six seconds--between the first and last shots that murdered President John F. Kennedy. And in his analysis of them, Josiah Thompson proves beyond a reasonable doubt that a second shooter, and probably a third, took part in the assassination.

Sometimes, after reading some of the more disappointing books about the JFK assassination (and there are TONS of them), I shake my head and really wonder if anything beyond the Warren Commisssion's conclusions had really occurred. Then I pick up SIX SECONDS IN DALLAS and turn to any page. And there is no longer any doubt that a conspiracy murdered our president. It's a shame that this book is out of print. I hope that some of the publishers who have made a fortune out of the glut of conspiracy books--like Thunder's Mouth Press or Carroll & Graf--will pick up the rights to this great book and publish it for a new generation of JFK assassination researchers. That new generation will need it!
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When Philosphy Really Mattered, January 4, 2009
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
After a raft of books over the past 40 years, a book dealer friend lent me this tome to read. It is, as sub-titled, a "micro-study" of the JFK murder. Thompson, a philosophy professor at Yale, obviously taught Aristotle, for the book is a treatise on Aristillean Logic. A is A, Socrates must be Socrates, he cannot be non-Socrates; and in its approach it is brillant.
Thompson winnows the wheat from the chaff with logical precision, considering and rejecting hypothesis as he narrows his scope. The dented case (CE543) from the School Book Depository floor could not have come from the Carcano rifle, hence 2 shots at most were fired from that direction.
The author does not delve into Oswald's mysterious "defection" without funds, nor the quick help from State in getting him back from the USSR, it is soley concerned with events in Dallas, specifically those fatal Six Seconds when the shots were fired killing our president.
This is a brillant work by a logical mind and the reader must constantly remind himself it was written in 1967, prior to many revalations concerning the Crime of the Century.
As a personal aside, many years ago I purchased a used Carcano rifle to experience how it worked and if the Warren Commission scenario was at all possible. Interestingly enough, it carried the same "serial number" as Oswald's rifle, C2766, which was not a serial number but a series number.
The action on this rifle, and I am an experienced rifelman, is something akin to pushing a round pebble through a square tube. It is absurd to think this was a weapon of choice to kill a president when a perfectly good 1903 Springfield could have been had for a couple dollars more. A German Mauser is more like it, the Carcano was called the "suicide rifle" by Americans in the Italian Theater during WW2.
But I digress, this book is one of the best on the JFK murder, although it poses more questions than it anwsers. As advertised, it deals only with the "how" of the killing, not the why or who.
Nonetheless, it is a very worthy read for us aging baby boomers who cannot help but grasp it has been all downhill since Kennedy bought it in Dallas.
The lesson of the matter is that those who kilt Kennedy got away with it and their scions are still in control. Kennedy wasn't a saint but he knew which end was up as to the military-industrial-congressional complex and was going to do something about it. Hence, he had to go.
Read this book, you wouldn't be disappointed.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Meets Expectations of the Time, November 23, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas (Paperback)
A marvelous study for the time it was written. And fortunate for all, Dr. Thompson has just recently "re-surfaced" - showing that the Zapruder film was NOT altered...contrary to recent books like "Assassination Science" and "Bloody Treason." Have Amazon.com try to obtain a copy of "Six Seconds..." - it is a worthwhile addition to the bookshelf of any serious Kennedy assassination student.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Seminal Work of Its or any Generation, March 11, 2012
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
Josiah "Tink" Thompson, once a philosophy professor who discovered a mystery deeper than the rambling arguments of philosophers, created the first, and still the best, scientific inquiry into the murder of President John F. Kennedy. Thompson's success in dissecting the myriad, micro-second events contained within the Zapruder film was so overwhelmingly accurate that Time-Life, who had purchased the film to supress it, had to perform an about face and not allow Thompson to use their materials to prove a conspiracy.
To this day, Thompson continues his research into the events of November 22, 1963, and his all-too-infrequent visits to JFK Symposia are universally the highlights of the event.
Pay what you can, pay what you must, but you need to read this book--one of the few that can HONESTLY claim that its evidence was suppressed.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, May 9, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
Pity it's out of print. It is a must-have for any serious researcher. Its theories are more than probable, much more than Fetzer's nutty theories of Zapruder film alteration.
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27 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best pro-conspiracy titles out there, March 24, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas (Paperback)
I believe that Lee Harvey Oswald alone killed Kennedy. I've also read about five books that tout various conspiracies in the JFK case, and _Six Seconds in Dallas_ is the best of them. Thompson appears to be one of the more honest conspiracy researchers who attempt to find an answer to the mystery rather than just endlessly find fault with the Warren Commission. His theory of the shot that hit JFK in the back (or throat, depending on how you see things) is particularly interesting and almost compelling. I recommend this book whether or not you believe Oswald acted alone. It's very readable and to the point.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 Years and Counting..Still So Sad..., March 14, 2013
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
How painful, how totally painful it is to write- yet again-of the events surrounding President John F. Kennedy's assassination on November 22, 1963. We wonder if justice will ever be done.

"Six Seconds" is an astoundingly well researched and documented account of the tragic events of that dark Friday afternoon so long ago. SS is heavily scientific -almost to the point of overkill. The good news is that author Thompson leaves no investigative stone unturned. It's all here, examined from multiple angles and perspectives. SS is positively loaded with charts, graphs and photos. These photos are not all of the highest quality or sharpest focus. They tell the story all the same. This reviewer will try for as brief a synopsis as possible, chiefly to save himself emotional strain! These are Thompson's cardinal points:

! There was NO MAGIC BULLETT! JFK and Texas Governor John Connally were hit separately. This is solidly proven throughout the text. The bullet removed from Governor Connally was in near pristine condition. It could not have ripped through the body of JFK first. The lack of a "magic bullet" destroys the Warren Commission's chief contention of a solitary assassin. There is this key quote from the Governor on Page 69: "There is no (magic bullet) theory. There is my absolute knowledge and Nellie's (Mrs.Connally) too, that one bullet caused the President's first wound and that an ENTIRELY SEPARATE SHOT struck me". (Emphasis from this reviewer).

! JFK's frontal wound was NOT an exit wound! He was shot from the front from the infamous grassy knoll adjacent to Elm Street.

! NONE of the military pathologists at Bethesda Naval Hospital were forensic pathologists. That itself is highly irregular, as was not having the President examined in Dallas-the place of his murder. As most of us now know, the leading Bethesda pathologist went home that night and burned his notes!

! The Warren Commission never examined the autopsy photos nor allowed civilian experts to do so.

! A leading critic of the Warren Commission has been Dr. Cyril Wecht (b 1931), former Professor of Law and Director of Forensic Studies, Duquesne University and Chief Forensic Pathologist, Allegheny County (Pittsburgh, PA). According to Google, he now heads the Board of Trustees of the American Board of Legal Medicine. He has a long resume! In the Appendix to "SS", Wecht -at great length-skewers the Warren Commission and the Naval Pathologists. A brief summation of Dr. Wecht's scholarly beratement on the Commission is this:

"TRUTH WAS NOT THE AIM OF THE COMMISSION, NOR WAS TRUTH THE END PRODUCT OF ITS LABORS". (Emphasis from this reviewer). The Doctor goes into vastly more specifics in the text.

How does one conclude here? This reviewer believes that "Six Seconds" is the ultimate in scientific enquiry into the JFK assassination. This is a demanding text but rewarding for those who can wade through it. This reviewer understands that the Warren Commission report will be fully released in 2019- 56 (!) years after the assassination. Doesn't that delay speak loudly?

The case is still not closed, Mr. Posner.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard Evidence, November 22, 2013
This review is from: Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination (Hardcover)
I read this book in college. It pains me to see that it has been successfully kept out of print. If you've ever wanted to see real evidence with your own eyes, this is the book to read. I'm not saying you will necessarily agree with all the book's conclusions, but you will never have any doubt about one thing: the official story is bunk.
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Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination
Six Seconds in Dallas: A Micro-Study of the Kennedy Assassination by Josiah Thompson (Hardcover - January 20, 1967)
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