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Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic, and Other Satisfactions (Music in American Life) Paperback – August 1, 2000


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Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic, and Other Satisfactions (Music in American Life) + Urban Spacemen and Wayfaring Strangers: Overlooked Innovators and Eccentric Visionaries of '60s Rock
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Product Details

  • Series: Music in American Life
  • Paperback: 166 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252069153
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252069154
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,418,592 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Hicks admirably describes some often-overlooked varieties of rock. Garage is rock made by unprofessional, often adolescent musicians who typically practice in a member's auto shed. The term implies a charming lack of sophistication, and Hicks lengthily explains the implications of musical decisions that many garage bands made based on what members could play, decisions that could eventuate in the overexhilaration garage rock often expressed. Hicks' discussion of psychedelic rock is no less detailed, and he cites resemblances to garage that many fans may not have noticed. His academic bent is best employed in the chapter on the song "Hey Joe," recorded by scads of bands (the Leaves and the Jimi Hendrix Experience cut the most familiar versions). In a musicologically riotous passage, he traces conflicting "Hey, Joe" authorship claims and winds up suggesting it is a venerable folk song of unknowable attribution. The technical side of this book can't be ignored, and casual readers and fans may be put off. Diligent, musically engaged readers, however, will glean much information and insight. Mike Tribby --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A grammar book loaded with insights and details of which, betcha, even the most hard-core rocker is oblivious." -- Dave McElfresh, Goldmine "[An] engrossing and truly educational work that treats its subject seriously while maintaining the sense of adventure that went into the sound's creation." -- Discoveries "A delightful book, covering selected facets of a large musical era in considerable and highly readable detail." -- Frank Oglesbee, Communication Booknotes Quarterly ADVANCE PRAISE "A thoughtful, compelling, and stimulating addition to the literature of popular music studies. Hicks engages the musical details of rock music exceptionally well, accounting for their production and interpreting their significance. We need more such work." --Robert Walser, author of Running with the Devil: Power, Gender, and Madness in Heavy Metal Music "A fresh and fascinating account of an important body of American music... Hicks's book rings true, much more than anything else I've read on the subject." --Charles Hamm, author of Putting Popular Music in Its Place

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence Green on October 25, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Having been a musician in the 60s to the present, it was a real treat to read this book. Admittedly, none of us players never knew what "flat VII" chords were, but I still related to the musical examples and such. As a guitarist, I can agree with Mr. Hicks' belief that garage musicians arrived at their chord progressions because of the natural tuning of the guitar (i.e. in 4ths). I guess this book is going to be quickly and pleasantly understood by any primitive musician who eventually got degrees in music...!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. Fisher on November 15, 2005
Format: Paperback
I don't normally write reviews for amazon, but I felt I had to say something about this book being that only one of its three reviews on amazon is positive. I recently checked this book out from the music library at Florida State University hoping to find out some information on psychedelic music. What I got was much more than I hoped. The book is incredibly well-researched, well-written, and thought provoking. It was easy to tell that the author is passionate about his subject matter, something I found when reading another one of Hicks's books on Henry Cowell, which always makes for an exciting read. Granted the book is aimed toward musicologists and music theory mongers--not your average dilettantes--so it is understandable that the theoretical language that Hicks so often uses is enough to alienate some. No flowery journalistic writing one would find in Rolling Stone Magazine here. Bravo!
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16 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I got this book because it had a picture of the Music Machine on the cover,but this is one boring book.It's hard to believe someone could write a book about 60's garage bands and make it boring,but Michael Hicks has done it.I was mildly interested in the chapter on the evolution of the song "Hey Joe",but that's about it.When will authors stop writing pompously about rock'n roll?(See an old issue of "Kicks" magazine to see how it should be done!)
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8 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
Pseudo intellectual freshman psych major. Nuf said
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