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Skin Hunger (A Resurrection of Magic, Book 1) Hardcover – July 24, 2007


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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 720L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (July 24, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689840934
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689840937
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #499,636 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In this darkly atmospheric fantasy, the first in a planned trilogy called A Resurrection of Magic, Duey weaves together the stories of two teens who live in a world in which the working of magic has a turbulent history. When her bitter father dies, Sadima, a young woman who can communicate with animals, keeps house for two renegade magicians at a time when magic has been outlawed. Her experiences, which include learning to read and falling in love, alternate with those of Hahp, born generations after Sadima. Exiled by his wealthy, disapproving father, he attends a school of wizardry where, among other unpleasantness, students are starved to death if they can't conjure up food. The pacing in this page-turner accelerates as the stories progress and links between them emerge, moving toward a cliffhanger ending that will leave readers anxious for future installments. Rayyan's chapter-header spot artwork was not seen in the galleys. Tixier Herald, Diana

Review

"Beautifully written, fierce, and unforgettable." -- Holly Black, author of Tithe --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author


I write books for children and YA/adult readers.

For TEENS AND ADULTS:

THANKS!!! to all the people who have gotten in touch about the Resurrection of Magic trilogy. I am writing the third book NOW...and am astounded at what is happening in the city of Limori.

My blog: kathleenduey dot blogspot dot com ...has writing updates, tiny excerpts, a few videos, and NO SPOILERS.

A few lines from yesterday's work:

In the moonlight, the magicians dragged some kind of heavy bundles onto the stage.One of them rolled off and landed in a heap. Two of the magicians lifted it back up and for an instant, she saw dangling legs, a boneless arm swinging back and forth.


The trilogy has been translated into German, Polish and French. I love hearing from readers in any language!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
For YOUNG READERS:

The Unicorn's Secret books have gotten lovely new covers by Sandara Tang, an amazing artist based in Singapore. The fan mail from astounds me. I am now hearing from parents who read the books when they were in grade school and are rereading them with their kids.

Excerpts from my books are on http://www.kathleenduey.com






Customer Reviews

Overall I enjoyed it and found it to be an intriguing and well written book.
K. Eckert
I can't wait to dive into the next book, and if you are a fantasy fan I suggest that you read this as soon as possible!
Lori
Two hours later, I finally made myself put the book down, knowing that sleeping late the next morning was impossible.
Ruth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Lynn on September 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a high school librarian, I get frustrated when a few books get a lot of attention when there are so many high quality books for young adults out there. This book is one of the quiet gems that I want to share with all of my students because Duey has created characters that are truly resonate with teenagers. Even though the situation Sadima and Hahp are in may not be familliar in time or place, there are so many aspects of who they are that mirror teens that I see every day. I, myself, adored Sadima and her heartfelt love and connection with animals. Hahp's pain and desperation is physically painful to me, as a reader, because Hahp is such a "real" person.

One of my students took the book on Friday, and when she returned it this morning (Monday), she said that she hasn't found a book that she got so lost in in a long time. And this is one of my most prolific readers, so she had a broad frame of reference.

Share this book with teens (and adults) in your life! It's one of the better young adult books published this year!
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on November 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Despite what the cover may say, Kathleen Duey's SKIN HUNGER, first installment of her fantasy trilogy A RESURRECTION OF MAGIC, is not a novel. It's a third of a novel. Or maybe it's two novels. Maybe it's a sixth. But anyway you slice the cake, it's not enough.

The book alternates chapters narrated by Sadima, a farm girl, and Hahp, a second born son of a cruel merchant. The catch is that they live several generations apart. One in a world that desperately needs magic and the other in one saturated and corrupted by it.

The story opens on the night Sadima is born. Her family is cheated by a fake magician, who instead of assisting in the birth, steals their valuables and lets her mother die. Unsurprisingly, Sadima grows up in a family that hates magic and she is forced to hide her gift of understanding animals. Franklin, a servant of a young nobleman named Somiss, finds her and tells her about his belief that magic will solve all the problems of the world. Together, the three try to rediscover magic. Hahp is sent to an academy of magic. There are nine other boys. Eight of them come from wealthy families and the ninth, Hahp's roommate, is a mysterious peasant named Gerrard. Unlike Franklin's lofty ideals of teaching everyone magic, here everyone must earn the right to learn. And those who do not or cannot will die.

I think this book will appeal to both boys and girls. Initially, each protagonist seems to represent the traditional story of their gender. For Sadima, the girl, it is a love story and for Hahp, the boy, it is an adventure story. At first, I thought the sweetness of Sadima's part was a nice balance to Hahp's grittier and darker part. Over time, the two stories blur together.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jenine M. Cafarella on October 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
When I first read the description for Skin Hunger, it sounded intriguing. Now, having finished the book, I can definitely say intriguing is only the tip of the iceberg. This was a very unusual fantasy set in a world of wizards much crueler and warped than anything Harry Potter could have dreamed of. In actuality this is really two separate stories in one, paradoxically intertwined by common characters in a way not completely revealed, at least not in this first volume.

In the first part we are introduced to Sadima, saved and raised by her brother who loves her but cannot believe in her gifts. The second story is of a businessman's youngest son, Hahp, who is sent to a strange and horrifying academy to learn wizardry, or die trying. I would hate to give anything more than this away as I believe the story is best read with blinders on going in.

I will say that it is a very dark, well written, young adult fantasy. It is descriptive but not overwhelmingly complex. The author feeds you clues, bits and pieces as the story goes along, that reveal how tightly woven the two stories are. Although this seems like it would be frustrating, the result is actually quite engrossing. There is a little bit of romance in here, although I would not, by any stretch of the imagination, say this is a girly tale, and it actually feels a bit fatalistic. You're left highly questioning the possibility of a happy ending which is unusual, and a little disconcerting, but adds to the overall tone of the book. After reading one of this author's earlier works and not being totally impressed, I have to say that I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the storytelling here.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By D. Stockley on August 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Skin Hunger is a smart, challenging, character driven fantasy that deals with difficult issues of abuse, deprivation, love, and misplaced loyalty. Fans of LeGuin's Earthsea series should take note.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ruth on July 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
Skin Hunger is two stories in one. Told in alternating chapters, Skin Hunger follows the story of Sadima, a farm girl who can speak to animals. Her mother died when the magician hired to heal her instead stole the family's few valuables and left her to die as she gave birth to Sadima. Seeking to find someone who can understand her abilities, she runs away to the distant city Limòri and starts keeping house for two budding magicians. The second story concerns Hahp, a young man sent to the Magical Academy in Limòri by a father who wants to get rid of him. Set several centuries after Sadima's story, Hahp lives in a time where magic is strictly controlled by a secretive enclave of magicians. In any class of students, only one becomes a magician, and the other students are never seen again.

I picked up Skin Hunger before I went to bed, intending to only read a few pages. Two hours later, I finally made myself put the book down, knowing that sleeping late the next morning was impossible. I picked it back up as soon as I woke, and sneaked in chapters between other tasks throughout the day. I was mesmerized by the story. It didn't bother me that Skin Hunger flipped back and forth between two separate stories because they were both incredibly well written and compelling. As interconnections between the two stories appeared, it drew me even deeper into the tale.

Though written for a YA audience, this is not a light or easy novel. The magicians at the academy psychologically and physically torture their students to the breaking point. Watching these young men falter and fail was emotionally painful at times. Duey does not shy away from some of the grimmer realities of family and romantic relationships, setting up a bizarre love triangle between Sadima and the two magicians.
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