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The Skinny About Best Boys, Dollies, Green Rooms, Leads and Other Media Lingo: The Language of the Media Paperback – April 11, 2006


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

For anyone who has ever stuck around for the credits at the end of a movie and wondered what gaffers and best boys do, Weiner's compendium of media slang, jargon and shoptalk will be a welcome read. A contributor to Public Relations Quarterly and author of Webster's New World Dictionary of Media and Communications, Weiner covers everything from advertising to broadcasting to slang used by comedians and explains the lineage of phrases such as "break a leg," a good luck wish that dates back to ancient Greece, and technical terms such as double trucks, which are two-page spreads in newspapers and magazines. Essentially a repackaging of his dictionary content in essay form, the book overflows with trivia and definitions of media terms and is best consumed in small doses. While the narrative flow aids in reading, it also makes it difficult to hone in on terms. Thankfully, a 28 page index remedies this.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Richard Weiner is the author of Webster's New World Dictionary of Media and Communications, which was a Library Journal "Best Reference Book of the Year." A former public relations executive, he writes a monthly column on media jargon for Tactics, the publication of the Public Relations Society of America.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Reference (April 11, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375721479
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375721472
  • Product Dimensions: 4.6 x 0.6 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,570,312 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Great reference book written in an entertaining manner. All the jargon I wanted to know in the media fields.

I question a few of the entries (the few I knew something about !).

The "Telestrator" was not invented by John Madden, and

ironically (if you read the introduction to the entry)I believe "clap track" should be "clap trap".

In the Introduction, the author solicits corrections, but only provides a snail mail address ! "Old School"
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Format: Paperback
Who would ever guess it would be so much fun to weave one's way through the mysterious words that appear on mastheads and screen credits? Richard Weiner has provided us with delightful stepping stones into the glamour of movie sets and editorial rooms. He's a best boy, and then some!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nils T. on April 13, 2006
Format: Paperback
Ever wondered about the meaning of terms listed at the end of a movie? (It's called a "crawl".) Here's a book that, for the first time, explains it all. I found it indispensable for understanding the various terms involved not only in tv, but media in general. Weiner has provided an easy-to-read, interesting compilation of these terms, written in an engaging personal style. More than a straight-laced dictionary, it gives you insight into newspapers (see the entry of the Los Angeles Times), public relations (see marcom), politics (see Beltway), tv and motion pictures (see Lucille Ball), football (see John Madden), comics (see Borscht Belt) and thousands more. All in all, a fascinating look into the insider's world of communications. I can not recommend it more highly.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Simi Linton on May 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
Teachers, writers, midtown bartenders, and anyone else who needs a crash course in today's media terminology should pick up Richard Weiner's new book, The Skinny about Best Boys, Dollies, Green Rooms, Leads, and other Media Lingo. It's a great desk reference and a good gift for media junkies, theatre and film buffs and crossword types. The author has a wit as quick as Google and a nice prose style. I was informed and delighted by this book.
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