Skins R

Amazon Instant Video

(96) IMDb 7.2/10

For Police officer Rudy Yellow Lodge, the painful legacy of Native American existence on an Indian reservation is brought home every night as he locks up the drunk and disorderly, which frequently includes his own alcoholic brother, Mogie.

Starring:
Graham Greene, Eric Schweig
Runtime:
1 hour 27 minutes

Skins

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Chris Eyre
Starring Graham Greene, Eric Schweig
Supporting actors Gary Farmer, Noah Watts, Lois Red Elk, Michelle Thrush, Nathaniel Arcand, Chaske Spencer, Joseph American Horse, Wilda Asimont, Dave Bald Eagle, Bruce Bennett, Robert A. Bennett, Gil Birmingham, Joe Black Elk, Kato Buss, Jenny Cheng, Tokala Clifford, Dale Cooks, Chris Eyre
Studio First Look
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

This movie was very well acted and had good actors in it.
Charlene A. Wilson
Rushmore, which is given an abruptly abbreviated treatment in the movie, will also make a lot more sense.
Ronald Scheer
Out here in the Midwest, you will still meet Native Americans from time to time outside of reservations.
Jeffrey Leach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

142 of 144 people found the following review helpful By Miroslaw A Drozdzowski on September 20, 2002
I just saw this film at the Native American Museum in New York during it's premiere in this city. It's an amazing film. Darker and more thought provoking than Smoke Signals, it still maintains the sense of humor so characteristic of Chris Eyre's work. The story takes place in Pine Ridge County, SD, which is, as we quickly learn from the film, the poorest county in the United States. It is also Oglala Lakota Indian reservation. The film is shot on location, with all the starkness of the surroundings carefully exposed. The narrative revolves around two brothers. Rudy (Eric Schweig) is a cop and a vigilante, who is using legal and extra-legal means to help his community. Moggy (Graham Greene) is a triple Purple Heart Vietnam veteran and a chronic alcoholic who tries to maintain a sense of humor in face of misery and depression. Deep love between the brothers serves as the backbone of the plot. Things get out of hand when Rudy's vigilantism causes Moggy's suffering. Chris Eyre employs both tragic and comic elements to give the film a fresh and unique dynamic. And a provocative ending.
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59 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on November 5, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Native American director Chris Eyre has created another excellent film about life on the reservation, told from the Indian point of view. Other reviews here represent the content of the film well, its story line involving two brothers and its social commentary, exposing the impact of poverty and alcoholism on the Lakota Sioux descendants of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse.

The movie, however, provides only a partial view of the book it's based on by Indian writer, Adrian Louis. His novel, "Skins," has enough material for a 10-part miniseries. It immerses the reader in the deeper complexities of its subject matter, exploring the dimensions of its characters more thoroughly (and with darker humor) and conveying a great deal more about life on the reservation, with its compelling mix of Indian and white cultures and the resulting ambiguities, competing world views, and conflicted values. It is significant that Iktomi, the trickster spirit and shape-shifter, is a central theme in both novel and film, for appearance and reality, wisdom and stupidity, pride and shame, love and rage are all in a continuing dance for dominance.

Rudy, the Indian cop, portrays these confusing conflicts beautifully, representing both the law in his tribal police uniform and vigilante justice in his blackface and pantyhose mask. The author's book explores other dimensions of Rudy's confusion by letting us learn more about his relationships with women. In the novel he is married and estranged from his wife, and we follow the rocky ups and downs of his growing attraction to his cousin's wife, Stella, while he carries on with other men's wives as well.
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71 of 78 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 23, 2003
Format: DVD
Those are the word of my 78 year old grandmother who was born and raised on the Pine Ridge Rez. This film reminds me of the place where I learned so much about my culture, and had so much fun with my cousins. This exploration into the community, should be seen by those who desire a glimpse into modern rez life. Wounded Knee happened only a little over a hundred years ago, and genocide did not end with the massacre. White Clay sets the example as this town is filthy rich, dependent on alcoholics for profit. They do not care how many Indians die, just like Lincoln did not care when he mass-hanged the Sioux. Carved into Paha Sapa, Mount Rushmore, is the ghosts of 4 presidents (including Ol' Abe) who face the east over the land of the Oglala Lakota. Some people see this as "mockery", would the Jewish appreciate a huge stone carving of Hitler staring down over Tel-Aviv? Each president has contributed more of less to exterminating the NDN. This movie will hopefully inspire some to see past their 9th grade politics class and learn more about multi-dimensions of U.S. History.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on February 24, 2004
Format: DVD
Shortly after receiving my driver's license I decided to take a road trip through Nebraska. At one point in my journey I suddenly noticed Indians everywhere--driving down the road, sitting in parking lots off the state highway, and standing in front of decrepit looking buildings. "What's going on here?" I said to myself, not knowing at the time that I was cruising through the Winnebago reservation in Northern Nebraska. I always tell this story to friends nowadays, especially ones who champion Native American rights, and it never fails to get a laugh. Why? Because they know most of us rarely encounter Indians, let alone spend any time on reservations. Out here in the Midwest, you will still meet Native Americans from time to time outside of reservations. If you live on the East or West Coast of the United States, however, you probably have little interaction with Indians. Oh, you might have seen one on a college campus, or know someone who knows someone who has some "Indian blood" flowing through their veins, but most Americans have only seen Indians in old photographs or on television. In short, we have little idea about the plight of the modern day Native American. That's why a movie like "Skins" is an important piece of cinema that all of us should watch.
"Skins" focuses on two brothers living on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, just down the road from Mount Rushmore. Pine Ridge is the poorest county in the United States, rife with chronic alcoholism, high infant mortality rates, sky-high unemployment, and low life expectancies. It's a rough place to live and raise a family, a fact Pine Ridge police officer Rudy Yellow Lodge learns anew everyday as he deals with murders, assaults, rapes, and other alcohol and poverty induced rampages.
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