Sky of Swords: A Tale Of The King's Blade 3 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $7.99
  • Save: $0.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sky of Swords : A Tale of... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Orion LLC
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is lightly used with little or no noticeable damage. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sky of Swords : A Tale of the King's Blades Mass Market Paperback – September 4, 2001


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.19
$0.95 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$1.99


Frequently Bought Together

Sky of Swords : A Tale of the King's Blades + The Gilded Chain:: A Tale of the King's Blades + Paragon Lost: A Chronicle of the King's Blades
Price for all three: $21.57

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 58%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Tale of the King's Blades
  • Mass Market Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (September 4, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380791285
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380791286
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,374,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A lot of Dave Duncan fans let out a squeal at the end of Lord of the Fire Lands, the previous Tale of the King's Blades. (The Gilded Chain was first in the series, and Sky of Swords comes in third.) It seems that Duncan, in this ingenious, Rashomon-style series, had managed to kill off King Ambrose twice in just two books, and in a different way each time.

But this devilish author knew what he was up to, and Sky of Swords promises to answer all your questions. Just as The Gilded Chain jumped back and forth in time and Lord of the Fire Lands followed a concurrent tangent plot from Gilded Chain, Sky of Swords will likewise tie your brain in knots for a spell. (It should be stressed that all of these books are standalones, following different characters through overlapping timelines--you don't need to read them all, but each is much richer for having read the others.)

Swords picks up Fire Lands' crossbow-bolt-between-the-eyes finale somewhere around page 80. But this time we're looking through the eyes of Princess Malinda, this book's irascible (she is Ambrose's daughter, after all) but ultimately likable heroine. We learn about Malinda's bumpy upbringing, but Swords doesn't really get interesting until the aftermath of Ambrose's death, the ensuing threat of civil war, and the outcome of Malinda's trial for treason (which begins on page 1, but in true Duncan fashion, doesn't actually happen until near the book's finale). What's the best part of Sky of Swords? Not to ruin anything, but you've probably already read its conclusion--in the final pages of Gilded Chain. --Paul Hughes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA-In this third entry in the series, Princess Malinda is furious when her father, King Ambrose IV, arranges her marriage to the Baelish King Radgar in order to end a decade-long war. She fully intends to go through with it, however, until her groom gives her the option of walking away. So she does, and he assassinates her father in full view of the wedding guests and the King's Blades, an elite group of magically bound, magically enhanced swordsmen. The princess's baby half-brother is named king, but when the sickly child dies, Malinda seizes the throne, killing the Lord Protector in the process, but unfortunately letting two other contenders for the crown slip through her fingers. She is eventually imprisoned and accused of treason. A small band of Blades comes to the rescue, but rather than pursue her claim and subject Chivial to civil war, she determines to try a risky sorcerous ritual. This book, like the others, is an entertaining, swashbuckling adventure. The Blades are charming characters with legendary prowess at more than just swordplay. Malinda is a daring, stubborn, and kindhearted young woman who always acts with courage and aplomb. The realm of Chivial becomes more defined with each book, but there is plenty left for Duncan to explore.
Susan Salpini, Purcellville Library, VA
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Dave Duncan is a prolific writer of fantasy and science fiction, best known for his fantasy series, particularly The Seventh Sword, A Man of His Word, and The King's Blades. He is both a founding and honorary lifetime member of SF Canada. Dave and his wife Janet, his in-house editor and partner for over fifty years, live in Victoria, British Columbia. They have three children and four grandchildren. Visit his blog and webpage: www.daveduncan.com

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
13
3 star
3
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 32 customer reviews
The first book is "The Gilded Chain" about a character named Durendal.
silliman89
Wonderful character development and it was great to see the events from the previous two books at another angle.
General Pete
This is one of the few books I have read that has pulled off a solid action plot with a solid political plot.
Andy Gray

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Gary Spechko on October 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is the third book in a trilogy, following The Gilded Chain, and Lord of the Fire Lands. Each was intended to stand alone, but the three combine to tell a slghtly larger story.
The Gilded Chain was my favorite Dave Duncan book (and I have read and enjoyed the vast majority of his works - it's a shame that many are currently out of print). I was intrigued to discover the discrepancy between its ending and that of Lord of the Fire Lands, the second book. The first two books do stand alone marvelously. This third book resolves the contradictions between the first two, but is the weakest of the three, and should not be read without first reading the other two books.
I did not like the manner in which the contradiction between the first two books was resolved, but despite that, the book tells a good tale, and gives the reader more depth of information about the Blades as an order, and as individuals. One cares about the characters. If you liked the first two, you'll like the third as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Arachnae on October 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I was very impatiently waiting this third King's Blades book to see how Dave planned to resolve the very puzzling contradictions between the first and second books. I was not disappointed - I literally had to keep reading until I got to the end.
If King Ambrose is Henry VIII (and he clearly is, with all his multiple wives and his problems with the 'conjurers'), then Malinda is Elizabeth I. And we get plenty of backstory to help us understand the woman she grows up to be.
Some things left me sad (poor little Amby's curtailed life, all the Blades who died, sniff) and some things made me happy (the rehabilitation of Radgar, whom I loved in Lord of the Fire Lands), and there were a lot of things I would have liked to have seen amplified, but then the book would have been too heavy to lift.
The Noble and Ancient Order of King's Blades is one of Dave's most enchanting inventions, and I sincerely hope that he can find more stories to tell in this universe. I've never met a King's Blade I didn't love. -- Jane
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By David S. Thun on October 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Like other fans of "The King's Blades," I was eagerly awaiting this book to find out if it resolved the confusing contradictions between the endings of the previous novels. Be warned-yes it does. You will either love it or hate it, but it is resolved. Duncan once again spins a taut, gripping tale-this time concerning political intrigue surrounding the Princess Malinda (a minor character in the previous novels), and the bloody civil war brewing over her potential succession. Unlike "Lord of the Fire Lands," more attention is paid to the Blades in this volume. Malinda's personal guards are well-drawn characters (especially Dog), and Malinda herself is fleshed out into a far more complex and sympathetic personality than before. I didn't think much of her in previous books, but she's great in this one-both tragic and heroic. Plus you get the usual swordplay, treachery, conjuration and war Duncan is so good at. As with "Fire Lands" the last page ends rather abruptly (bringing the reader full circle back to "The Gilded Chain") but the story didn't disappoint me at all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sabreur on October 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Like a number of other reviewers, I was interested to see how Duncan would resolve the discrepancy between "The Gilded Chain" and "The Lord of the Fire Lands."
Unfortunately, without giving too much away, he uses an overt "deus ex machina," or in this case, "deus ex octagram" device.
The good news is all is set right in the end. The bad news is that you have to live through a real Gotterdaemmerung to get there--and when all is resolved, I, at least, was left feeling rather manipulated.
However, the book is well-written, and Malinda is an interesting character--Duncan has worked hard in this trilogy to give us three very different protagonists. It is just too bad that he essentially has to pull a rabbit out of the hat to bring the trilogy to closure.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By wench on August 12, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is literary genius. The historically conflicting endings of the first two books are resolved in a clean and brilliant stroke. The main character is likeable, and her perspective sheds an intersting light on the two main characters from the first two novels.
About half-way through Sky of Swords, when truly shocking things had been happening that are in total conflict with the first novel, the light suddenly went on in my head as suddenly I *knew* what Duncan was doing. And I was truly impressed.
Altho it has been recommeded that they should be read in the cyclical order of Gilded Chain, Sky of Swords, then Lord of the Firelands, despite Firelands having been published before Sky, don't ruin that one moment of realization that is so rare in any work of fiction by doing this. Read them in the order that they were published.
Pure literary genius.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By steve hoover on March 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I read The Gilded Chain a couple of years ago and thought it perhaps one of the top five books I have ever read (in 22 years or so). Well, I reread it a couple of weeks ago and I enjoyed it as much (possibly more) than I did the first time. I also enjoyed Lord of the Fire Lands (second in the series). Not as much as GC, though I was intrigued by the alternate ending. I think I missed Durendal (What a character!)....maybe I will like it better the second time around. I also was apprehensive about Sky of Swords due to some moderately bad press posted. However, Sky of Swords was excellent. Malinda evolved into a quite likable and courageous heroine and her Blades were almost on par with Wolfbiter and Quarrel (from The Gilded Chain). I enjoyed the time twists you used to make the story different than the usual fare. All the twists and turns were why I decided to read GC again. I'm currently reading The Reluctant Swordsman by Mr. Duncan and it is proving to be as good as I hoped.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?