Sky Tinged Red and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $0.74
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Sky Tinged Red: A Chronicle of Two and a Half Years in Auschwitz Paperback – April 23, 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 423 pages
  • Publisher: Beaver's Pond Press (April 23, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592989942
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592989942
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,097,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Isaia Eiger(1897-1960) was born in Radom, Poland. An accountant, amateur artist, and leader in the Jewish community, he was among the first group from Radom deported to Birkenau, a camp still under construction, in April 1942. After liberation, he moved to Minneapolis, where he worked as a cabinetmaker and was involved in the AFL-CIO.

Dora Eiger Zaidenweber was born in Radom in 1924, the daughter of Isaia and Hanna Rose Eiger. She survived the Radom forced labor camp and Birkenau and was liberated from Bergen- Belsen. She settled in Minneapolis in 1950 where she obtained an M.A. in economics and raised two children. She spends her time reading audio books and studying Talmud.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
WOW........ what else can I say.
A.Brown
I recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about one of the major chapters of the Holocaust.
Don Radlauer
The chronicle itself flows very well - as a story.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was privileged to hear the author's daughter, Dora Eiger Zaidenweber, to speak in person recently. After hearing her share a portion of her personal experience during the Holocaust and her subsequent efforts to translate her father's chronicled account, I knew I had to read this book!

If only the Preface and Forward were written, the reader wouldn't believe the horror Isaia Eiger and his family experienced. As his daughter and grandson recount, the human mind cannot fathom the evil that took place during this time in history.

Ripped from his home, his family and all humanity, Isaia experienced this pain, not once, but twice, to tell his story. Yet, as I read Isaia's account, I was amazed how he not only captured incredible details (e.g., numbers, times, dates, and names) but the emotions and physical depravity of each moment. I can only imagine the mental, emotional and spiritual toll to relive and document his experience.

The chronicle itself flows very well - as a story. It is not overwrought with facts, but provides historical context to help the reader understand the succession of events. The glossary and list of names in the back are also very helpful. The diversity and hierarchy of both victims and the abusers illustrates how widespread and systematic the evil was.

Isaia provides the reader his thoughts and feelings without really making it about him. Instead, he writes as another participant among many - a witness. I would have to constantly remind myself that he lived this; and these details were stained into his memory so that he might tell the world.

I am truly amazed how this story was written, recovered and translated. Mrs. Eiger Zaidenweber is to be commended, not only for her translation work, but her relentless determination and passion to honor both her father and all the victims whose stories cannot be told.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A.Brown on November 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
WOW........ what else can I say. I have read 100's of survivor Holocaust books and this one book has grabbed my soul and I don't think it will EVER let go! The thoughts, feelings and memories this book evoked in my were amazing. The thought that anyone could have bare witness or much less survived is a true miracle. Any one who is interested in the history of the Jews, World War 2, or just an amazing story of human survival by all means read this heroic book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William Garrison Jr. VINE VOICE on June 2, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
“Sky Tinged Red” by Isaia Eiger (June 2013). WOW!! What a really revealing, and riveting, account of the experiences of a Polish Jew who surprisingly lived to tell his tales of surviving as an inmate in the Nazi-killing camp called Auschwitz, for two-and-a-half years during World War II!

Yes, many other books have been written by Jews who survived persecution by Nazis during WWII. However, in this book, the author provides an almost unique account of what it was like working inside one of Hitler’s execution-concentration camps for Jews (and other “undesirable” peoples: homosexuals, gypsies, the mentally ill, etc.).

Most newly arriving Jews were executed almost immediately upon arrival at one of these death-camps. The author survived as he had several civilian skills that were sought by the Nazis in helping to make their death-chambers work smoothly: those who had plumbing and electrical skills, and in the author’s case, those who were conversant in several languages and who had nice calligraphy skills in filling out the various Nazi forms used in recording the extermination body-counts.

After his surprising release from the death-camp, effected by when the guards ran away from the approaching Russian soldiers, the author began a meticulous recording of his experiences of seeing families separated upon arrival at the camp: most being immediately sent to the extermination gas-chambers, and a few kept alive as they had useful work skills needed by the German administrators.

This book notes the randomness of life or death: depending upon merely which work detail a prisoner was assigned for the day – life if the job needed to be continued the next day, or possible death if the task was completed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dorothy on May 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is one of the best books I have ever read about Auschwitz, It contains information that I didn't know although I have read many books on the subject
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Richard Monks on March 16, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My kids can't blame me for anything I did wrong, and it is always consoling to read about how terrible the Nazis were, especially when they had their victims cornered. I will tell them that far from doing anything positively or intentionally wrong, I did not even engage in an intentionally bad or actually bad practice at all during the whole entirety of child-rearing. Instead, if you wish to find examples of true evil, you read something about the Nazis, and the Khmer Rouge killing fields, about real atrocities, and note how badly true evil really plays out. I am forever grateful to writers who have penned their experiences in such horrible situations - for the benefit they bestow to humanity, and for my own and my readers own personal reflection!

Read this book if you want one that you can read, get meaning from, put down until next time, and still come back to. It covers Isaia Eiger's 2-3 years in Auschwitz, so if you take a year to read it, that is nothing compared to his day to day horror. He relates so well what went on, from the standpoint of one for whom all the coincidences of life were allowed - not being killed, the Nazis finding a use for him, not being around when random killers felt the urge, and being able to make notes meanwhile, and then to secrete the notes. The story of how his daughter found and assembled the full story is worthy of short story reading, in itself. As a survivor, he wanted what he knew to get out there, some day. Certainly that could do some honor to his compatriots, those who also went through Auschwitz or camps similar to that. This has been a steady, helpful and useful read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search