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99 of 110 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfect overview of Duane Allman's career
This 7 disc, 129 track retrospective of Duane Allman's recorded legacy is nearly Bear Family quality, making it by far the best representation of Duane's career. The biggest deficiency of the box set is the relatively small booklet, only 72 pages in length, 2/3 of which is devoted to track annotations. That aside, the collection covers Allman's entire career, from his...
Published 21 months ago by Kevin D. Rathert

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203 of 225 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and Pricey
So, I guess I'll be the dissenting voice here. Duane Allman is one my musical heroes. More than 40 years gone and I still listen to his playing almost every day. Needless to say, I was drooling with anticipation at the prospect of a career retrospective that would promote his genius and unearth treasures. While a lavish box set in and of itself may achieve that, I'm not...
Published 20 months ago by Mataro


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203 of 225 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and Pricey, April 14, 2013
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
So, I guess I'll be the dissenting voice here. Duane Allman is one my musical heroes. More than 40 years gone and I still listen to his playing almost every day. Needless to say, I was drooling with anticipation at the prospect of a career retrospective that would promote his genius and unearth treasures. While a lavish box set in and of itself may achieve that, I'm not sure the music here does. First of all, what is the purpose of this box? Obviously, it's not for Duane-completist collectors like me. For instance, Duane solos on, I think, six of the tracks on Herbie Mann's "Push Push," but there only three tracks from that album here, so we'd still need to buy the whole album, making this redundant. It's not a greatest-hits collection, so what's the point of including two versions of "Blue Sky" and another two of "Dreams," as well as entire disc of juvenilia on which Duane can barely be heard, not to mention four irritating tracks from Lulu when one would suffice? Indeed, that's an ongoing issue with a collection that frequently features the admittedly brilliant playing of a session musician: because a huge chunk of the collection is devoted to Duane's playing on others' recordings, one often must work hard to find him, either because he's buried in the mix as a sideman or because he just plays the occasional killer lick. Speaking of the recordings, a lot of this box doesn't sound very good. Although some tracks, like the Cowboy entry and Duane's three solo tracks, have never sounded better, a lot of the Atlantic session work is badly distorted (I need to go back to the LPs to determine if this is a mastering error here or the way it was recorded at the time). Finally, if the point was to show Duane's development as a musician over his too-short career -- a point I'm not sure can be made, since he seemed to go from a teen to a full-blown genius over the course of a few weeks -- his legacy would have been better served by a more concise, less expensive and better annotated collection. Instead of a sticker, a guitar pick and cheap disc sleeves (two of mine are already torn), I'd have preferred that the money be spent on hiring someone to do a track-by-track commentary that directed listeners to Duane's contributions and what they added. If there's any good news here, it's that there do still seem to be gems to be found. For instance, although traders have had the live Delaney & Bonnie stuff for years, it would be wonderful to have an official release of the full D&B radio broadcast. But the bottom line is, if you're looking for a place to start with Duane Allman, for less than $50 (i.e. less than half the price of this box), you can get the Allmans' "Fillmore Concerts" and D&D's "Layla," with money left over for assorted ABB releases. And if you're already worshipping at the temple of Duane Allman, the Charlie Parker of the blues guitar, someone who never played the same solo twice and whose slide playing was as vocally expressive as any singer, head to eBay and start collecting. Just don't outbid me on the "Duane Allman Dialogs" LP, ok?
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99 of 110 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfect overview of Duane Allman's career, March 19, 2013
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
This 7 disc, 129 track retrospective of Duane Allman's recorded legacy is nearly Bear Family quality, making it by far the best representation of Duane's career. The biggest deficiency of the box set is the relatively small booklet, only 72 pages in length, 2/3 of which is devoted to track annotations. That aside, the collection covers Allman's entire career, from his earliest recordings in 1965, at age 18, done with his brother Gregg under the moniker The Escorts. These 3 tracks are among the 9 previously unreleased tunes included in the set. The anthology moves to 1966 recordings, a total of 6 done with brother Gregg as The Allman Joys, variously released as 1 single side, 3 album cuts and 2 unreleased sides. Then come 9 recordings as The Hour Glass again with brother Gregg as a band member. A couple of songs the brothers released as the 31st of February follow. The next disc and a half are comprised of session recordings Duane did in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, with artists such as Clarence Carter, Wilson Pickett, Arthur Conley and Aretha Franklin to name but a few. Pickett's killer take on "Born To Be Wild" contains Duane's jet fueled guitar work, with same being true of Aretha's "The Weight." Disc 3 contains 3 tracks Duane cut under his own name and include his more than acceptable vocal efforts of "Happily Married Man" and "Goin' Down' Slow" a cover of St. Louis Jimmy Oden's blues classic. The disc also has what may be Duane's most recognizable studio effort, his incredible guitar work on Boz Scagg's take on Fenton Robinson's blues chestnut "Loan Me A Dime," a 13 minute magnum opus. The remaining 4 discs include a virtual best of The Allman Brother Band, both live and in the studio, as well as studio sessions with Johnny Jenkins, Ronnie Hawkins and of all people Lulu. None of these tracks are to be taken lightly. Allman's versatility shines through as he recorded with Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett and their Friends, among others, before landing in Criterion Studios in Florida, and recording 11 tracks (4 of them found here) with Eric Clapton's Derek & The Dominos including their smash "Layla" followed by Duane and Eric doing their cover of the Little Walter blues classic "Mean Old World." Also included are session tracks done with blues legend John Hammond and jazz great Herbie Mann. The box ends with studio and live tracks from the Allman Brothers LP "Eat A Peach" released just after Allman's tragic death at age 24. So, what we have here are 7 cds, 129 tracks, well over 8 hours of incredible tunes spanning the all too brief 6 year recording career of perhaps the most highly rated slide guitar player of all time (the only player possibly more noted would be Ry Cooder), who proves with this release to have been a master of the guitar, both electric and acoustic as well as the dobro. Allman's daughter, Galadrielle, is to be lauded for her time consuming effort in licensing all the tracks collected here and for her heartfelt essay which joins an overview of Duane's music by Scott Schinder in the booklet. As previously mentioned, the one shortcoming I find in this set is the lack of a more in depth essay regarding Allman and his many musical journeys. That aside, this is without doubt the best box set release of 2013, and indeed one of the best box set releases ever, both in conception and production. Much time was obviously spent in obtaining the best possible sources for the numerous rarities contained in "Skydog" and Paul Blakemore's mastering job is impeccable. With only 10,000 numbered sets available, many people will no doubt be left out in the cold on this release and already I see sets being offered at more than double the original asking price. I pre-ordered my copy from The Allman Brothers site and paid $99.99 plus shipping and received my copy on 13 October, 6 days prior to the official release date. My advice, seek out a copy of this set as soon as possible and hope that you are able to find a copy before the price gouging begins. This is definitely one set you do not want to miss out on.
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49 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth Every Penny, March 20, 2013
By 
r.j. zurek (Cape Coral, FL United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
Compiling a retrospective of this magnitude had to be daunting. Duane Allman's career was cut short, and he was only twenty four when he died in 1971, but his legacy is remarkable. He played on hundreds of recordings as an in-house session guitarist, and the Allman Brothers taped most of their shows, so we have seen a great many archival recordings over the years. Top notch production is needed for a project like this, and we have two at the helm. Bill Levenson is a Grammy winning compilation specialist responsible for the fortieth anniversary "Layla" sessions and the Millenium collection, among many others. The participation of Galladrielle Allman, Duane's only child, makes this a familial labor of love you won't find in many compilations.

Galladrelle was only two years old when Duane's motorcycle collided with a truck on Oct. 29, 1971. Her work on this retrospective is amazing when you consider the years spent talking to those who knew Duane, searching the music and photos, all in an attempt to "bring my father into sharper focus". She opens her essay by stating "every child who has ever lost a parent knows the same burning curiosity I feel". That's setting the bar high. Galladrille is a fine writer, and she brings to light things about Duane that might not be common knowledge to all of his fans, such as his frustration with Muscle Shoals studios.

There are some previously unreleased gems here, including the first sides Duane and Gregg ever cut as the Escorts. What's of special interest on these tracks is Duane's unconventional playing. On "Turn On Your Love Light", Duane plays the traditional horn parts effectively while his little brother belts out the tune. Not bad for a couple of teenagers. On "No Name Instrumental", Duane concentrates on chords, sounding a bit like Link Wray.

The Allman Joys tracks were once released in the early 70's as "Early Allman", and two of the tracks here are available on the Allman Brothers' "Dreams" box set. The Yardbirds were a big influence on the young Allmans, and their rendition of "Shapes of Things" is commendable. Here we have two never before issued tracks where the brothers do the Yardbirds proud- "Mister, You're A Better Man Then I" and "Lost Woman" show that Duane could already hold his own with Jeff Beck while developing his own style. As a curious aside, I think "Lost Woman" is the only recording available where Gregg plays harmonica.

The Allman Brothers and the Grateful Dead shared the same fan base, so Duane fit right in with the Dead at Fillmore East playing "Sugar Magnolia" from "American Beauty". It's often said that Duane brought out the best in his fellow musicians, and Jerry Garcia soars with him on an extended lead break. I'm curious as to why this track has never been released before, as well as the three tracks with Delaney and Bonnie that are offered here for the first time.

I've read where some listeners take issue with the booklet, but I think it is very well put together. Along with Galladrielle's lovely essay, Scott Schinder of Rolling Stone and "Icons of Rock" wrote a brief but thorough overview of Duane's career. Quite a few of the photos included have never been seen before, and the session chronology is complete and detailed. The dates and personnel for these recordings also show just how many great artists Duane worked with over such a short time.

Some may feel that most of these songs are already available, and true Allman fans will have most of the music here. Well, I have, or have at one time had all the Allman Brothers available including "Anthology" 1 and 2, and the "Dreams" set. I always thought I knew all of Duane's work but I was not aware of the tracks by Willie Walker, the Lovelles, the Bleus or Spencer Wiggins. Please keep in mind that a lot of these tracks were 45's and can't be found anywhere, at least not easily. I think this retrospective is one of the best ever put together- and worth every penny.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ENCOMPASSING LOOK AT A MASTER GUITARIST, March 19, 2013
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
To paraphrase Frank Zappa-writing about this collection of music is like trying to listen to architecture. What more can be said about a consummate musician playing at the top of his game? It's quite simply a stunning overview of Allman's work from his early days to near the end of his life. Duane Allman is certainly one of the best guitar players-not only in the blues/rock/soul/r&b genres (also including his sometimes Coltrane like solos), but one of the best to ever pick up the instrument. How could he play with such sensitivity-his solos full of feeling-and yet sometimes raw and smokin' hot?

Will there be some quibbling as to what's included and what should have been included? Probably. And that's okay, because his playing was so good that a lot of his equally fine music just wouldn't fit unless this collection was expanded to several more discs, and this is a retrospective of Allman's work. But there's so much to enjoy here-even the familiar tunes seem to have added weight-because the music was judiciously chosen. Hearing all this music in one place makes it even plainer that Allman was a one-of-a-kind-player. I still remember hearing the ABB in their "Live Fillmore" period several times. And even towards the end of a tour, when the band was tired, Duane Allman would always rise to the occasion. Those concerts are towards the top of my list of the best shows from the late 60's/early 70's.

The packaging is very nice. Inside the substantial long box is a faux gold velvet lining, and two strings that are underneath the discs, which help get them out of the box. Each disc is inside a soft paper envelope, with the tracks listed on the back. The booklet (a bit shorter than the outer box) has an essay about Allman and the music included here. There's also an essay by Allman's daughter about her feelings for her father ("I am always searching for a song, a photograph, a moment saved in someone's memory to bring my father into sharper focus."), and gives this set a close personal feel. The many photographs (b&w and color) are also well thought out. Also included is a chronological track listing that has session details-most notably who played on what.

There's something for just about everybody here. I say just about everybody because deep fans/collectors will certainly have most of this music. But again, to hear Duane Allman's guitar (lead/slide/acoustic/electric/dobro) in the various contexts included in this set, makes for a powerful yet sensitive, exciting yet sometimes subtle, listening experience. To fully hear and enjoy this collection, you'll need to listen to it a couple of times through-and just let the music run through your head. Bouncing from the ABB to Ronnie Hawkins, to Lulu, and then Johnny Jenkins and John Hammond, not to mention the great Doris Duke, is touching on several genres of music in a relatively short time. Likewise from Sam Samudio to Ronnie Hawkins (again), to Delaney and Bonnie & Friends, to the ABB, to the Grateful Dead-and then back to the ABB, to Herbie Mann-is quite a musical journey. One last thing. Why aren't the albums by Cowboy in print? Their Capricorn Records albums need a good dusting off and given the "deluxe" treatment-remastering, period studio and live tracks-the whole works. I still have the original vinyl albums and every time I hear them I wonder when they will be reissued.

I hope the fact that this is a "limited edition of 10,000" will allow all the people who want this set to purchase it. On the underside of the box is that box's number of 10,000. I thought long and hard about purchasing this collection because of the price. But in the end art is priceless. And Allman's playing is truly an art.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What would Duane himself think of this ?, May 7, 2013
This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
This box set can be evaluated two ways, depending on your priorities: Are you a musician or guitarist interested in hearing every lick Duane ever played, or are you a music fan looking for some good ear candy?
I am of the latter. I am a huge Allman Brothers fan. I was excited when I saw this definitive box was being released. Fortunately, I had some gift money that I used to purchase the item. It did not come out of the household budget. My review will look at the merit of this set as if you have to convince your significant other of the $120 buy in price.
It's a long and varied set, that has some revelatory moments, but is ultimately musically disappointing. For Allman BrothersBand fans, the first disc is certainly going to be the most interesting. The first three songs were recorded in 1965, and are superb on their own merit. Considering Duane and Gregg weren't even 20 years old, it's even more enlightening. Next up is the Allman Joys, and the Hour Glass. Much of this has been previously available, but never in such a complete and clean sounding fashion. You can hear from the get go, what the musical priorities of the Allman brothers are (soul, blues, a little jazz), and these tracks are the DNA than would create our favorite band. Thrown in for good measure is an early version of Melissa, which is interesting, but better versions have come around since.
Than we hit this sets downfall, in an effort at being completist, lots of disc space is used on mediocre and forgotten artists that Duane played with. Just because Duane Allman played on a track, does not make it great. Starting with "The Bleus" at the end of disc one, all the way up through track two on disc three, its a long wade through some middling songs. Unbelievably, some great Stax artists appear, like Clarence Carter, Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, and King Curtis, but the songs fall flat surrounded by similar sounding music by lesser artists. Black artists playing white songs can sometimes sound like a wrong way street. Most of these selections I found disappointing. We have two iffy versions of "The Weight" by the Band, neither as good as the version at end of the Love for Levon CD.
Duane himself comes in for three songs on disc three. "Going Down Slow" was previously heard on the Dreams box set, and the next two were released on the Duane anthology: "No Money Down" and "Happily Married Man". Both are excellent. "No Money Down" rocks with a brash energy provided by Duane's hyper vocal, and ridiculous ad libbing (a psychedelic strobe spot). We can see why these tracks are on a different level, Berry Oakley and Johnny Sandlin play on them.
Otis Rush, the Duck and the Bear, and Boz Scaggs are in the middle of disc 3. I personally like the fun funky jive of the Duck and the Bear. Duanes lengthy outro on Boz Scagg's "Loan me a Dime" is well known. But some of the Otis Rush and Boz Scagss songs suffer the same mediocrity issue.
Than we get the Allman Brothers Band crashing in with "Dont Want you No more". It felt like 1969 for the first time ever for me, (I'm only 39). Those opening notes of the first album punch every other song we have heard out of the water with power and inspiration. From the moment Gregg growls at the beginning of "Cross to Bear" to the last notes of "Whipping Post' its amazing. But why? Why put the whole album on the set? Why split it between two discs? Don't most people buying this have all these songs already?
And so it goes for the next two discs....more forgettable music by second rate artists, that gets crowded out by songs you already know from the Allman Brothers Band or Derek and the Dominoes. We could get excited about "Sugar Magnolia" from the Grateful Dead. I have this set already on several bootlegs. It sounds as muddled and confused here as it does on an old cassette. It's not a dream come true for Allmans and Dead fans, Duane playing with the Grateful Dead. It's a confused messy jam, and better versions of Sugar Mags are out there, too.
By the time you get to the 7th disc you are hoping for some relief. The entire 7th disc is listenable on its own. We have the great live show with Delaney and Bonnie, but many ask why not the whole thing? The famous "You Don't Love me/Soul Serenade" tribute to King Curtis. Than the beautiful "Please be with me " by Cowboy. A couple more redundant Allman Brothers Band songs, before two ABB songs that demand a listen. The live version of 'Blue sky" is amazing. It will now be my preferred listening version of this song. Gregg sings harmony vocals a little behind Dickey (like Levon Helm did with the Band), and both solos are scorching. This is followed up by a lengthy, moody, and intense version of "Dreams". Both of these songs are available through Hittin the Note as the SUNY stony Brook archival CD.

A word about the packaging, it is lovely, it comes with a sticker and guitar pick. If you handle the sleeves carefully they won't break immediately, but I have been super careful and mine are starting to wear. It all looked so cool when I unpacked it.
Than I began to listen, and listen. Every disc several times. As you can tell, I am a bit disappointed at the musical quality of the affair. It most definitely tells the Duane Allman story, warts and all. What I learned from it, is that we already have the majority of what is the best of Duane Allman. Put on Live at the FIllmore East, and Layla one more time. It really doesn't get much better than that.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly The Best Anthology I Have Ever Owned, March 23, 2013
By 
Don Richards (Parker, Colorado, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
Seven-disc anthologies are meant to be listened to from start to finish. A snowy day like this is perfect for savoring in its entirety "Skydog", the incredible new Duane Allman anthology. Clocking in at 539 minutes over 129 songs, it is rich in its thoroughness, and the performances throughout are simply magical.

It's much, much more than The Allman Brothers, showcasing his performances with numerous others. Part of what makes this collection a treasure is the abundance of late-60's and early-70s R&B tracks on which Duane played as a session man. These are great songs on their own, and they provide wonderful glimpses into his slide technique that would later become the signature style heard throughout the Allman Brothers performances.

Five stars is Amazon's highest rating, but this box set is worthy of an even higher score.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank you Galadrielle, March 23, 2013
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This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
This is by far the best Duane Allman (ABB) collection I have ever seen, I haven't heard some of this music for years, "Loan Me A Dime" is exquisite. My Allman Brothers collection primarily is 1972 and earlier, Ludlows Garage, Atlanta music Festivial....etc, and this tops off the collection for me. I just love this box set. Most casual fans of the ABB had no clue how much session work this man did in such a short time, a truly gifted and talented artist cut short, we will never know what he may have accomplished, but what he did accomplish is just true genius. I can't thank Galadrielle and Bill Levenson enough, this is just really a masterpiece. All you hard core fans, better get one before there gone, glad I got mine, now we just want some video, PLEASE....... Again, thank you.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New material is great, lots of previously issued material, packaging is idiotic, November 17, 2013
By 
Panaracer (Horseheads, NY United States) - See all my reviews
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The music on this set is really great. However, half the music is already on stuff most Allman fans already have that would buy a 7 (!) disc set like this.

The sound is excellent and not compressed or brickwalled/loud, i.e. it has dynamics. Whoever did the mastering did a good job! There are a lot a gems in the tracks not already on ABB or the Anthology albums. Great stuff!

The packaging (on the second encore edition) was designed by idiots, which seems to be the course these days for the music industry as it declines. Why irritate the people who actually buy CDs at a premium??

$85 and they put the CDs in pockets???? Discs 1 and 6 are scratched. The pockets will scratch the discs on regular use. The only reason the other CDs were not, is that one needs to lift the discs away from the pocket (tight squeeze) to get them out. ONCE. Then into jewel cases. Obviously, the guy who designed this didn't actually use it. CDs are supposed to last a lifetime and do if you take care of them.

This is the 5th box set (different titles) in a row that has come with scratched discs. This is unacceptable!

I'd rather have a box with separate jewel cases, and the book is non-standard size, what's the point? They need to do it like Eric Clapton's first Crossroads issue - separate jewel cases and full size book. Most people who buy CDs today, prefer jewel cases. Why do they keep irritating their customers?

Hard slider box - pretty nice design. Actual quality was poor, with wrinkles and mismatched edges. I'm guess most are not like this.
The book is excellent, although again, odd sized.

The music is great and book content is good, but sometimes, I wonder if the music industry runs out of toes to shoot.

BTW, the paper materials used in the CD pockets are not recyclable. Jewel cases are.
Stop ripping us off with scratched discs!!!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing music, awesome compilation. Duane lives on!, March 25, 2013
This review is from: Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective (Audio CD)
I pre-ordered this as soon as I saw it. Longtime ABB fan, it was a must for my collection. I have really been enjoying the music. Duane had his way of accenting any song he was playing on. The classic jams are really good, love the old bands with the horns, it just flows. Such a tragic thing for the music world to lose Duane. This is a must for any longtime fan, or the new one exploring the music. The ABB is still making music today, no doubt that Duane would be loving the shows at the Beacon if he were still with us. Get this box and play it loud.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You gotta get this!!, January 15, 2014
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I have had the flu since this arrived, and my ears ring if I listen for too long, but so far the tracks I have heard are clearer than the originals on the Anthology CD sets. I love the additional soul music numbers, with Duane flexing his musical muscles in the background. I have never heard any track where Duane appeared, that he didn't bring out the best in the other performers, and boost the energy to another level. There are no dogs on these discs. There is a high degree of magic per disc. Look, if you're of the generation where music comes out of a computerized box, with maybe a lunatic making scratchy noises with turntables, perhaps you don't understand what music really is. This would be a good place to start. Duane didn't have much of a voice (he did try a few times), but he could make his guitar sing. Even Eric Clapton was knocked out when he heard Duane. In the studio environment where most of these tracks were recorded, Duane was a star. There has been nobody like him since. He was most at home on stage with his band, but he could improvise with the best, and he always found a way to play something new and usually brilliant even on minor records for local artists. To him it was about the music, self expression, and bringing out the song to best advantage. His experience touring the South gave him an ear for soul and blues, but jazz and pop were all within his reach. Even hardened chitlin circuit tourers can be heard exclaiming their joy at Duane's licks. He was the life of the party, and you can listen in. This is essential listening to me, I will always listen to this for the rest of my life.
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