Slam 2004 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(48) IMDb 7.2/10
Available in HD
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The unanimous winner of the 1998 Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, SLAM is a "coming to life" ghetto tale of a street pharmacist/aspiring rapper who finds salvation in his rhymes. Trapped in Dodge City, a drug-infested war zone in southeast Washington D.C., Ray Joshua gets caught up in a drug deal gone bad.

Starring:
Saul Williams, Sonja Sohn
Runtime:
1 hour 44 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Slam

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Marc Levin
Starring Saul Williams, Sonja Sohn
Supporting actors Bonz Malone, Lawrence Wilson, Beau Sia, Andre Taylor, Momolu Stewart, Ron Jones, Reamer Shedrick, Allan E. Lucas, Dominic Chianese Jr., Jerome Goldman, DJ Renegade, Liza Jessie Peterson, Taylor Mali, Bob Holman, Rhozier Brown, Richard Stratton, Marion Barry Jr., Weusi Baraka
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

This has to be one of the best movies I have seen recently, but it's also more than just a movie, an amazing experience.
S. Maruta
This film artfully reinstates the importance of sound power, the beauty of the poetic imagination, and even ties in a bit of old Egypt.
Luna *)
I, like many white middle class americans, was blind to the cultural renaissance taking place in the so called 'ghettos' of america.
bennen@primenet.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Win Martin on October 23, 2000
Format: DVD
Working in a video store, I've seen "Slam" repeatedly dismissed by white folks as "a black film", or "a movie about rappers". Please, don't let race distinctions turn you away from this film. "Slam" is one of the most noble uses of film I've seen in a long time. It challenges and provokes and creates intense thought. It is a ferociously intellectual movie, though not in a highbrow way. It has the unique ability to present complex and daunting ideas in a way that makes them unusually comprehensible. At the same time, it places a value on the process of writing and personal expression that has been woefully lost in the age of stuff-goes-boom movies. The performances - especially by Saul Williams, Sonja Sohn, and Bonz Malone - are impeccable, and I'm not refering to just their dynamic slam poetry sessions, which are electrifying in a way that few passages of film are. If you see one movie this year, let it be "Slam".
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By DukeOfEarl on December 3, 2004
Format: DVD
This was a pretty intense experience. I recently became a fan of Saul Williams, and I had to have this movie. It's a dark, yet learning experience for a man(Raymond Joshua) who gets sent to jail for possession, is hunted for on the inside, gets bailed out but realizes he's going right back. It seems like there are a lot of movies about prison and black folk, but this one was a little different.
I thought Saul did quite a job for this being his first movie role. I think it's based in large part on his real-life self. Some of the acting was an eyesore, like the Chinese guy at the beginning, good God! A few of the other small parts were iffy, but I think the main characters, who are all pretty much unheard of, did fine. The best scenes to me were when Ray was about to get his ass kicked in the prison yard and he busted out with an exhilirating rap, and when Ray and the prisoner in the next cell were rhyming. The latter shows a contrast between two distinct rapping styles. The other guy was swearing up a storm kicking violent gangsta rhymes, while Ray's was intense, but loving, etheral, mystical, and mind-bending. The other guy's style represents what gets played the most on the radio and is popular, while Ray's embodies an 'underground' attitude and the style that Hiphop was created with. I am a huge Hiphop guru, and I prefer Ray's style, obviously.
Otherwise, the movie leaves an impression, and gets you thinking about the ways of the inner-city lifestyle, as well as that in the prison. The poetry was what set this movie apart. Ray and the main female(forgot her name) perform at a poetry slam at the end of the movie. I wouldn't give this a five-star, but it's still good and worthwhile.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bart King on May 1, 2006
Format: DVD
It's a sign of SLAM's verisimilitude that I thought it might be a documentary for its first five minutes or so. (Not surprising, since director Marc Levin is known for his documentary work.) With only a couple of exceptions, the actors in it are amateurs, which actually works to the film's advantage.

Anyway, SLAM is a simple, sometimes dopey, sometimes thrilling story of a guy who winds up in jail, gets out, and might be heading right back in again. But both Saul Williams, the principal actor, and his love interest, Sonja Sohn (of THE WIRE) are real live poets, and man, does it show when they do their poetry readings... or "slams" as they are known.

And I'll tell you what: SLAM has some scenes that will knock your socks off.

There's one in particular where our protagonist avoids a fatal shanking in the prison yard by giving a dramatic reading of his poetry. One of his fellow felons says of the performance, "I still don't know what that nigga did, but it was fascinatin'." That was pretty much my reaction, too.

SIDENOTE: Yeah, that's crack smoker, prostitute patron, and former mayor of Washington, D.C. Marion Barry playing the judge. That was a cameo that blew my mind.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mike Tramber on March 20, 2001
Format: DVD
After seeing this powerfully delivered masterpiece of raw street savvy and mental intellect, I was moved. Saul Williams, as well as Sohn and Malone, in Slam inspired me, rather this (I don't want to call it a movie) this interpretation of life forced me to release a pent-up energy that was kept down for far too long. The completeness of this fantastic journey through urban, USA is exhilarating and painfully forgiving. A must see for all, the performances in this work of art are as moving as almost any book that I've read; it does not take away from the viewers mental imagery, it only adds to it (not too often that a movie can claim this). 5-stars are not enough -- see for yourself.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By bennen@primenet.com on July 9, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
When I finally too the time to sit down and watch this movie, I didn't know what to expect. I have always been a huge fan of poetry, the older stuff including pope, frost, Cummings etc. As well as some newer beat generation stuff including kerouac and gindsberg (i recently learned that Saul williams performed on stage with Gindsberg). Despite my love for poetry, i began watching this movie with a weary eye. Needless to say this lasted only a few minutes and soon i was completely entranced in the story of Raymond Joshua.This story does two amazing things, it addresses the inner city problems so many directors shy away from or glamorize as well as openins the audience's eyes to the miracle of modern day poetry. I, like many white middle class americans, was blind to the cultural renaissance taking place in the so called 'ghettos' of america. I guess it is a logical progression. Historically, art thrived where there was oppression, helplessness, and greed. The apathetic view government has applied to modern day black Americans fuels the hope and poetic freedom of this movie. By forcing the realization of america's inner-oppression, this movie is assisting in a struggle that has gone under-exposed for many years. Although it is practically laughable to make such a blunt claim, but this movie could change the world
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