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Slave Children of Thomas Jefferson Paperback – September 1, 1998


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Paperback, September 1, 1998
$9.64
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Kiseido Publishing Company (September 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 4906574009
  • ISBN-13: 978-4906574001
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 1.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,292,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Samuel Howard Sloan (born September 7, 1944 in Richmond, Virginia), is an American chess journalist and publisher. While having no formal legal training, he once orally argued a case in front of the Supreme Court of the United States. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

1.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
Don't waste your time (or money). This book is almost as poorly written as it is poorly cited. The author obviously had no editor. There are nearly a half-dozen better choices if you want reliable information on Jefferson and the slavery connection.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kimberley Wilson on February 11, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author asserts that Jefferson begot children with his slave and reminds the reader that this was not usual or shocking behavior for many antebellum Southern men. This book is amusing because of it's high spirited, conversational style and because of it's flaws. It could've been a very good book if only Mr. Sloan had sought out the services of a copy/content editor. The technical problems with the book are just too distracting.
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46 of 70 people found the following review helpful By R. E. Dixon on April 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
The allegation that Thomas Jefferson was the father of children by his slave, Sally Hemings, was published in a Richmond, Va. newspaper in 1802. In a bumpy read (the writing style ranges from breezy to turgid), Sloan's book is typical of what is becoming an "attack the famous" genre. He offers no new scholarship and skirts around the lack of any direct evidence to support his theme. Sally Hemings was about 14 years old when she travelled to Paris as the maid to Jefferson's youngest daughter. The rumor started by the newspaper charge is that she became pregnant and returned to Monticello to have Jefferson's child. Apparently the author was unaware, when he published this book, that DNA testing was being conducted that ruled out Jefferson as the father. During the period from 1795 to 1808, Sally had four children that lived and Sloan claims Jefferson paternity for all of them. He does not explain, nor have other purveyors of the myth, why no one who observed this Jefferson-Hemings relationship ever made a statement about it during Jefferson's life. This includes his daughters, his grandchildren, brother, sister, and nephews, many of whom resided at Monticello during these years. It also included Sally's two brothers James and Bob, who were freed in the 90's, and her son and daughter who ran away in 1822, as well as two of her sons, a brother, and two nephews who were freed by Jeffersons's will. Imagine how important Sally would have been at Monticello as Jefferson's long time mistress, virtually his wife, yet not one word remains to describe her. She is an historical cipher. The author has clearly read extensively on the subject, but if you are looking for a documented history, this is not your book. Sloan even admits that he "is not impressed with footnotes.Read more ›
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