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Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South Paperback – October 1, 1992

ISBN-13: 978-1565840287 ISBN-10: 1565840283

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Paperback, October 1, 1992
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 423 pages
  • Publisher: New Press (October 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565840283
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565840287
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,362,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Slaves Without Masters rates with the best, for it combines careful scholarship, acute analysis, and an admirable historical imagination. -- The New Republic

About the Author

Ira Berlin is a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, where he lives. He is the author of Many Thousands Gone, Generations of Captivity, and Slaves Without Masters (The New Press). He co-edited Remembering Slavery (with Marc Favreau and Steven F. Miller), Families and Freedom (with Leslie S. Rowland), and Slavery in New York (with Leslie M. Harris), all published by The New Press. His books have won the Frederick Douglass Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the Abraham Lincoln Prize, among many other awards.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By s stone on August 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
I guess I am not reading the same book as the other guy. I saw this book as well written, well reasearched, relevant and extremely factual. Berlin's entire book is based on nothing but facts, and he has tons of sources that he refered to. He hs a lot of great refrences, old news papers(which are interesting to read), cogress meeting records, the laws of that time, the census, and lots of other great forms of accurate facts. "Slaves Without Masters" exposed a lot about a time period in american life that was very interesting for a "free" African-American. The book is about the free negroes in the antebellem south, which in most southern states were between 60 and 80 percent of the "free" African-American population, this would explain why we hear a lot in this book about Mulattos. THE MAIN BENEFIT OF THIS BOOK IS THAT IN A DOCUMENT PROVEN AND FACTUAL WAY, EVEN "FREE" PEOPLE CAN BE SLAVES.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By margie dittmar on September 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has all of the ins and outs of why Louisiana is just a little bit different... I wondered why Milliken Frazier, a free black from Coushatta, Louisiana would move over to Texas and sign up to be a slave for Jefferson S. Nash so he could be a pottery... Then wondered no more. It describes the climate in Louisiana at that time perfectly... Actually based on quite a bit of data. Nice 1974 take on the problem...
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By 21st Century Woman on February 17, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An important book to add to your collection about slavery. This book should be on the "must read" literature for any Black History class. Well researched and cited with facts, leaving the author's personal twists and biases out of the work. It challenges the current perception that ALL Blacks in America were from a system of slavery without any strengths. It decimates the current hypothesis that slavery and its inception is based on an evil called racism. It brings to light that there were Negroes in the colonies 150 years before the American Revolution and an economical/labor focus system evolved to economically ensure that the colonies thrive because failure literally meant death. I recommend laying your foundation about Black race relations with this powerful subject matter with the Preface and Prologue section. Also have your highlighter ready because you will be introduced to the "caste" system instead of the Critical Race Theory stating that slavery is because the colonials were racists. This book is very important for someone collecting scholarly work in this area.
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0 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert L. Ellis on July 12, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
the book was in such poor condition that I ended up throwing it away. poor, nasty, awful, disgusting, dirty and stinks
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