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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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Sleeping Ugly Paperback – April 14, 1997


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Sleeping Ugly + Seriously, Cinderella Is SO Annoying!: The Story of Cinderella as Told by the Wicked Stepmother (The Other Side of the Story) + Honestly, Red Riding Hood Was Rotten!: The Story of Little Red Riding Hood as Told by the Wolf (The Other Side of the Story)
Price for all three: $18.81

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 5
  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; Reprint edition (April 14, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0698115600
  • ISBN-13: 978-0698115606
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #243,671 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Cute story with fun illustrations for children and adults alike.
Stacy R.
In a startlingly funny retelling of the classic Sleeping Beauty tale, Jane Yolan spins a clever and sweet tale in Sleeping Ugly.
Abbie Normal
As vessels, it really is what is on the inside - character - that matters.
Phyllis Glenda Hotton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jessica (tellarren@yahoo.com) on October 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
I am absolutely amazed that no one else has reviewed this little book yet. By far one of my all-time favorite stories, the book, Sleeping Ugly, is meant for children, but anyone with a sense of humor will savor this story.
Set in some unknown kingdom, Sleeping Ugly is a short story about a beautiful, perfectly worthless and mean princess named Miserella, a plain-as-mud orphan named Jane, a fairy in disguise, and an imnpoverished prince (the youngest son of a youngest son) named Jojo. This story takes the traditional tale of Sleeping Beauty and promptly sets it on its ear. I received this book at age seven, and at age eighteen I still know the whole thing by heart. It's amazing that a book this short and this simply written can be so hilarious and filled with such wonderful characters. There's even some morals included, and the illustrations are great.
Every parent should buy this book for his/her child, and anyone who likes fairy tales should buy this book for him(her)self. You won't be disappointed!!!!
This is one of the best stories ever, period!!! Don't be fooled by its diminutive size or simple writing!! Go directly to a bookstore and pick it up!!!
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56 of 65 people found the following review helpful By JR Corry on June 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
The story starts out well enough, centering around the lovely-but-spoiled Princess Miserella and the sweet-but-ugly Plain Jane. Naturally, the book is filled with the contrasts between their two characters: Miserella makes people miserable while poor Plain Jane's sweetness is overlooked by people who only see her outside.

When the two meet a fairy godmother, things start to look up for Jane when her kindness wins her three wishes. Before she can use them, however, Miserella ticks off the godmother so much that her magic goes bonkers and puts them all to sleep. When a prince comes across the three sleeping women, he falls for Miserella's looks and decides to kiss her awake. Before he does this, however, he decides to "practice" kissing by kissing the godmother and Jane first. It is here that both the prince and the author of the story make their fatal mistakes.

When Jane wakes up and sees the prince (after being kissed by him), she naturally wants him for herself. Rather than taking the golden opportunity of developing a real relationship between the two characters, author Jane Yolen throws it away by having the brainless bimbo of a fairy godmother cast a spell on the prince that magically forces him to love Jane (that godmother's not too smart with a wand, is she?) In just a couple of sentences, Yolen totally ruins what began as a meaningful story.

First of all, I absolutely despise the idea of love spells; love is a wonderful, wild force that cannot possibly be controlled or imitated. Second of all, what's the point of forcing the prince to love Jane? If Yolen doesn't let Jane win the prince's love naturally, then what message does this give girls with low self-esteem? That a guy can't like you without a spell on him?
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
In a time when we are swamped with superficial ideas, it is wonderful to see a book that shows children and ADULTS how to appreciate a girl or woman for her personal worth instead of just her looks.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "stellane" on October 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
I remember borrowing this book from the library over and over and over as a small child. I was so struck by the idea that the beautiful princess didn't win the prince (never mind that he was the youngest son of a youngest son with no jewels or wealth or property to speak of), but that she lost him to an orphaned "Plain Jane". It was only recently that I read the opinion of some "enlightened" reviewer that labeled this book as "feministic." What is so feministic about the idea that someone would look past the lovely facade of one to see the inner beauty of another? I read this book to my class of five-year-olds, and I had just said, "The end" when they began chanting in unison, "Read it again; read it again!" At the end, continuing in the strain of humor that flows throughout this tale, is the story's moral: "Let sleeping princesses lie, or lying princesses sleep . . . " while in truth, it teaches something far more important.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "erniebear" on September 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
I didn't encounter this book until I was 20, and I regret all the years this wasn't one of my favorite children books. Written by the ever amazing Jane Yolen (check her out, folks. She ROCKS!), this "fairy tale" is a riot, a romance, and a sweet little read. Whether you use it to entertain children (which it will) or to keep your college roommate entertained at one in the morning as she pulls her hair out, anyone and everyone will enjoy the book.
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26 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Julia Gwin on March 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
The story begins well, but the intended portrayal of the Plain Jane as inwardly beautiful fails when she reveals a desperately wicked heart, taking no pity on the hapless sleeping princess who is ugly inside but beautiful outside. Plain Jane even abuses the still-sleeping princess by using her as a hat stand and hangs a "no kissing" sign on her to prevent her being "kissed awake" by guests. In effect, she condemns the sleeping princess to death, thus exalting herself and becoming ugly in the eyes of those who know true beauty would never do such a thing. I consider Plain Jane more insidiously ugly, for she pretends to have true beauty (of heart) while her physically beautiful counterpart offers no pretense at inner beauty.
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