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Slob Paperback – December 1, 1987


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: e-reads.com (December 1, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585861553
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585861552
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,625,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Rocco Malacca on May 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
Slob is a mystery so violent and revealing that it was tucked away in the horror section. It topped two genres as a result, and spawned a series of sequels that many Miller fans don't know about. After a publishing a small press novella called Haunts way back when (which is an unusual ghost story made up of a report and a transcript), Miller disappeared for a while and then came back with Slob, which hit big as a Signet paperback. He then churned out two a year for a few fast paced years:
Frenzy - a novel of a hitman whose daughter is sold to a smut film producer who is financially backed by the hitman's mob bosses. He begins to pick them off one by one as Detective Jack Eichord (my favorite fictional detective ever rivaled only by newcomer author Heywood Steele's own Dorf Brentson) tries to solve the mystery. This is what the film "8mm" should have been. Gripping, but a bit hurried at the end.
Stone Shadow - another Eichord tale about twin brothers, one of whom is a vicious killer. Beware the "missing page" in the original edition! His next novel, Profane Men, was a Vietnam story that isn't part of the series.
Iceman - Possibly Miller's best, Eichord goes after another murderer, the sickest yet. This book marked a turning point, where Miller took more time developing a satisfying ending instead of a BANG that left you needing to read the next book to put together certain details (such as why is Eichord sometimes engaged and on the wagon while at other times dumped and drunk? This fluxuated, and the woman and girl from the first and third novels seem to fade away without explanation and are not present at all in Frenzy, but anyway...).
Slice - The return of Chaingang, who nursed himself to health in sewers and has a baby, and you won't believe who ends up with it!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By William Latham on September 13, 2000
Format: Paperback
There's nothing gentle about Rex Miller's "Slob". Long out of print, Miller's initial novel of his nightmarish Chaingang character is cut from the same vein as the works of Thomas Harris, but their differences couldn't be more stark. Miller's writing is powerful and frenetic, with flairs of jazz and pulp sensibilities throughout. "Slob" flirts with the profane on many occasions, with a sadistic streak that's overwhelming when you first experience it, but make no bones about it, Miller is one of the most powerful writers of horror you'll ever read. "Slob" offers everything that Hannibal Lecter is not -- Chaingang is a killing machine, with few if any social graces, and a more relentless and cruel psychopath you're not likely to find. Be warned -- there's something in this book to offend everyone, but Miller's skill, while not for everyone, makes him required reading -- "Slob" is cutting edge and then some.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By coachtim on June 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
"Slob" is a fantastic adventure into the mind of a serial killer. In what is the first of a number of books about Daniel Bunkowski (a.k.a. Chaingang), Rex Miller has created a character that is so grotesque and replusive, that it's hard to imagine anything like him. Hannibal Lecter is tame in comparison. Miller does a great job developing the "Chaingang" character and giving the reader a primer in "how to create a serial killer".
"Slob" is definitely not for the faint of heart. The graphic decriptions of Chaingang's killing sprees border on being too intense. Miller pulls no punches and makes no apologies for his style.
Having actually read one of the sequels to "Slob", ("Savant") about five years ago, I was interested to see how the series started out, so I was pleased to find a copy of this book. (For years it's been out of print and almost impossible to find.)
My only complaint about this book and indeed the whole series, is the unbelievable unfallability that Chaingang has. Here's a 400+ pound giant that moves with the stealth and grace of a cat burgler. His intellectual abilities also appear to be too "godlike" and prescient.
With all of that in mind, this is an extremely "quick" read and one that's hard to put down. If you're a fan of Thomas Harris or James Patterson, then you'll find the works of Rex Miller to your liking.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
I am not a horror fan reader, but this book accidently fell into my hands and drew me in instantly.
CHAINGANG Butowski is a monster unlike anything I've ever read, including Red Dragon.
The book moved along at a bloody pace with rich background of this huge serial killer that enthralled me. My only complaint was the battle scenes and the ending that left me feeling somewhat flat.
The editing of this book is atrocious too. There are so many mega-overlong sentences that at times it just made this hard to read somewhat.
But Rex Miller's style of writing is mostly compelling and chilling, and is that not what you should expect in a horror, serial killer novel?
I will try the next one in the series, so that says something about it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James Robert Smith on July 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
I read this novel when it first appeared some years ago. Although he produced this great debut novel, the author seems to have faded into obscurity. I rarely even hear his name spoken, these days. Which is sad, for SLOB seemed to signal the arrival of a truly new and unique voice in horror and suspense literature. The book has its flaws, but they are minor ones. It's powerfully written, the lead character is original and quite frightening, and the book draws one in from the first line and holds you to the last. You can't ask for more than that from a genre novel.

Rex Miller, where are you? Certainly you have some new tales to tell?

(06-22-2006) Apparently Rex Miller died a few years ago.
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