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Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps.
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Slot Machine. Unknown Binding – 1995


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: HarperCollins. (1995)
  • ASIN: B003521BVW
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,155,029 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Hans Bodewig on January 25, 2002
Format: Paperback
This marvelously written book takes you straight into a not-so-perfect teenager's head. Elvin Bishop is fat, weak, indefensive and insecure. Just as Elvin gets out of school he learns that he is going back, sort of. He is going to a so-called "retreat", which is really just his new school. The camp is called "Twenty one nights with the knights". Elvin is always being picked on. He knows that the retreat is going to be terrible ever since the bus-ride to the camp when everyone starts picking on him and stealing his food. To Elvin, food is almost as precious as gold, so when they were stealing his food he felt miserable. To comfort himself he would look at the school's brochure, trying to image and pretend how much fun he would have there. His vision slowly fades away as he starts settling in. Almost immediately, everyone was picking on Elvin; his only defenses being his two best friends Mikie and Frankie. Out of those two his only real friend is Mikie because Mikie really understands Elvin. Frankie is his friend too but he isn't really a "real" friend, just someone who is nice to Elvin. Elvin feels that: "Frankie is just too perfect to be my friend".
The camp has a system of "slots", or places in sports. Elvin is just good for nothing, no sport seems to fit his personality, he tries football, soccer, baseball and finally when he thinks he found his place in wrestling, his hopes are turned down by the coaches when he is asked to leave because of other incoming students. Later when he finds a slot in art he meets new friends and finds out that strength doesn't always have to be physical.
Chris Lynch is a great author who takes you into the head of a 14 year old boy, revealing his thoughts and impressions. "Slot Machine" is mostly comedy and drama. If you are interested in a good, refreshing novel, then this is a book for you.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Joe on December 23, 2003
Format: School & Library Binding
I read the book Slot Machine by Chris Lynch. It is an adventure/comedy book and is very entertaining and I never wanted to put down the book. I choose this book because when I looked at it it seemed interesting because of the title of the book. I loved the book because of the predicament that the main character was in. Also, there was kind of a diffrent story on the side which included one of the main characters two best friends. I would recomend this book to people from the 6th grade to the 10th grade. Chris Lynch has written other books including the Shadow Boxer and Iceman. Lynch has a masters degree from the writing program at Emerson College.
This book is about a boy named Elvin who is going to a new school. He is at a retreat where all the freshmen go to find what "slot", sport, they are in. Unfortunately Elvin can't find himself a slot. For a side story he has two best friends. One of his best friends Frankie was trying to fit in with the older and cooler kids. His other best friend Mike found his slot easily and is like there father, he kept encouraging Elvin to find a slot. In one part of the story Frankie trys to pursuade Mike and Elvin to come with him to a party with the older kids. Frank says "You guys want another chance tonight, the O's kind of think you two are wimps". After Frank said that I wonderd if Mike and Elvin were going to fold under peer pressure, but they did not. That is just on of the parts of this excellent book. I recomend if you are between the age groups I suggested that you definetely read this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tigers#1 on November 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
The book that I read was Slot Machine by Chris Lynch. This book is about a boy named Elvin who is 14 years old. Elvin and his friends decide to go to this camp over the summer because they had nothing else to do. The camp was called 21 Nights with the Knights and it was for mainly overweight people. Once they got there they found out that they had to pick a slot. A slot meant that you would pick a sport and try to get better at it over the summer. Then Elvin found out that some of his teachers were there from school to help. The first slot that Elvin picked was football and the first day of practice he got hurt. After he was in the football slot, he got moved to wrestling and baseball slot. You will have to read the book to find out the ending.

One thing that I liked was when they were on the bus fighting over the cookies because I really like cookies. Another thing that I liked was when Elvin got hurt and met another friend. Then Elvin found out that you could only get three injury papers to see the nurse. The thing that I didn't like was when Elvin kept getting yelled at and moved to different slots.

I would recommend this book to people who like sports books and some conflict between the characters. This book is for boys who are in grades from seventh to tenth grade. Another similar author that I found to recommend would be Matt Christopher.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sandy Thomas on July 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
Chris Lynch packs a whallop in Slot Machine. Any young adult who has searched for his slot, his place to "fit in", will identify with Elvin Bishop. Readers will cry, moan, and eventually laugh with Elvin as he suffers through defeat, rejection, and then triumph. Lynch manages to sum up many readers' entire adolescence in three weeks of an action-packed, bully-infested, humiliation-filled summer camp. And yet our hero, Elvin Bishop, emerges stronger than he went in. He is secure in his knowledge of who he is, even as he watches his two best friends lose a bit of their perfection. Even though this tale is a bit tall, Lynch's writing contains realistic dialogue and character traits that young adults will identify with. Slot Machine is the epitomy of "coming of age" books, leaving readers a little more secure in the knowledge of who they might become.
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