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Slow Cooker Revolution Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 751 customer reviews

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Length: 341 pages Optimized for larger screens
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

This book has been tested, written, and edited by the test cooks, editors, food scientists, tasters, and cookware specialists at America’s Test Kitchen, a 2,500-square-foot kitchen located just outside Boston. It is the home of Cook’s Illustrated magazine and Cook’s Country magazine, the public television cooking shows America’s Test Kitchen and Cook’s Country from America’s Test Kitchen, America’s Test Kitchen Radio, and the online America’s Test Kitchen Cooking School.

Product Details

  • File Size: 17019 KB
  • Print Length: 341 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1933615699
  • Publisher: America's Test Kitchen (February 15, 2011)
  • Publication Date: February 15, 2011
  • Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004W3VLPY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #98,299 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

America's Test Kitchen is a 2,500 square foot kitchen located outside of Boston. It is the home of Cook's Illustrated and Cook's Country magazines and is the workday destination for over 3 dozen test cooks, editors and cookware specialists. Our mission is to test recipes until we understand how and why they work and arrive at the best version. We also test kitchen equipment and supermarket ingredients in search of brands that offer the best value and performance. You can watch us work by tuning in to our public television show, America's Test Kitchen.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a big fan of Cook's Illustrated . I get their flagship magazine and Cook's Country and watch both America's Test Kitchen versions faithfully on PBS. I'm also a frequent buyer of their cookbooks and have found many of my all-time favorite recipes in their pages.

Unfortunately, after making three of the recipes from "Slow Cooker Revolution," I'm not sold on this particular effort. All were OK, none spectacular, and, as far as I can tell, just about every one previously published. (A cheat often used by Cook's, but still annoying for its most loyal readers.)

My major complaint--and it seems to be in most of the recipes, not just the three I've attempted so far--is that Cook's takes what is best about the slow cooker, it's convenience (set it and forget it one-pot meals), and throws it out the window by requiring countless pre-cooking steps--far more than just browning meat or sautéing vegetables--that often dirty multiple pots, pans and bowls before you ever even get the ingredients into the slow cooker itself. There's also a good bit of post-cooking in many of these recipes, along with mid-cooking steps/additions that means you're constantly babysitting the slow cooker, even after getting the ingredients going. Not terribly practical for a device specifically designed to cook while you're not here.

If I'm going to use a dishwasher full of dishes, what's the point of dragging out the crockpot just to do the heating?
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The "new" name is "slow cooker" but most of us know the device as a "crockpot" because that's the name it was first marketed under a couple of decades ago. If you're like me, you got one because you thought, "Hey, I can put in the ingredients in the morning and have a tasty meal when I get home from work - cool". Then you found out that only certain recipes seemed to work well in the crockpot, er, slow cooker. You bought crockpot cookbooks, and found while many of them were beautifully designed with multiple and elaborate fonts, blank spaces for notes, line drawings of cute little collections of vegetables, the recipes either contained about 20 different ingredients or else the recipe required so much pre-browning, pre-sautéing, post-blending, post-broiling of the ingredients that it would just be quicker to cook the darn recipe once you got home from work.

I am really happy to say that "Slow Cooker Revolution" is the first sensible slow cooker cookbook in my collection of them. The book is very well designed. There is a page devoted to each recipe, and most recipes have a picture of the finished product. There is a list of ingredients, and from what I saw, everything there is available in my local supermarket. Each recipe starts off with a paragraph entitled, "Why It Works", in which the authors explain the choices behind certain ingredients or methods and why they work better than others. The recipes are clear-cut and easy to follow. Each recipe also an additional segment - either a "quick prep tip" or a "smart shopping" hint or an "on the side" short recipe.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Warning!! Yes, this IS a long review, and getting longer all the time with each recipe I try. I apologize for this and am working on being less wordy in future reviews.

So What's the "Revolution"?

It's supposed to be about debunking several myths about slow cooking, showing us that:

1) Slow-cooking is not about dumping unprepared stuff into a pot nor about the belief that if you just cook something long enough and with enough other stuff, it will always be edible
2) Great results occasionally require more appliances than just your slow cooker
3) Some ingredients can benefit from additional preparation

Two Recipes I sampled right away:

First sampled recipe: -- Nutella Bread Pudding --

* How could I NOT try a recipe that uses this most divine gift to modern civilization? It's the sort of dessert that has to be preceded by weeks of an ascetic diet, as it boasts whole milk, heavy cream, and 9 egg yolks. But it illustrates the importance of prep work in slow-cooking: the challah bread cubes need to be "baked" in a low temp oven for 40 minutes. Had the untoasted bread simply been placed right from the loaf and into the pot, I think it would end up as a custardy mush.

* The result? OmmMmmppfffGaaahh (that's OMG with my mouth full). Crazy good. Not as custardy as I feared with all those 9 egg yolks. Very company-worthy and a bit more sophisticated than your usual Betty Crocker bread pudding, but I suggest you serve it to company the day you make it. After refrigeration, it becomes really dense and much more intense. I followed the recipe EXCEPT for I used ½ tsp salt instead of ¾ tsp. Tip for future success: Challah loaves come in all sizes, so make sure you do your best to get the 14 ounces called for here.
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