Slow, Deep and Hard [Explicit]

February 6, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.03
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
12:36
30
2
8:54
30
3
7:46
30
4
12:15
30
5
6:44
30
6
1:04
30
7
9:14


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 3, 1991
  • Release Date: June 3, 1991
  • Label: Roadrunner Records
  • Copyright: 1991 The All Blacks B.V.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 58:33
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B0011ZTW6Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,996 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Possibly their heaviest song ever.
Pete
Most of the album is very dark and the rest of it is very funny.
edward h
Carnivore fans and Type O fans will probably like it.
Jamie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on January 16, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Before Type O Negative would make a name for themselves with their gloom/goth rock, they released this debut album "Slow, Deep, and Hard", an album which I hold as the quintessential album for those who have ever been cheated on. Opener "Unsuccessfully Coping With the Natural Beauty of Infidelity" is a twelve minute rant from frontman Pete Steele about cheating girlfriends and the heartache that goes with it, while "Xero Tolerance" continues this with killing the girlfriend's new boyfriend, and concludes with "Prelude to Agony" finishes all this up with killing the cheating girlfriend. Other songs like "Untermensch" and "Glass Walls of Limbo" deal with topics of hatred and introspection, and the final track, "Gravitational Constant" sums up the entire album with a tale of suicide. The catchy yet heavy gloom/goth/whatever songs bleed into one another, making "Slow, Deep, and Hard" more than an album and the tracks more than just songs, it makes everything the entire concept of what Type O (and mainly Pete Steele) stand for. All in all, this is an excellent introduction to Type O, and this album would not be topped until the instant classic "Bloody Kisses".
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jamie on May 1, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album sounds very different from the other works of Type O that i have listened to(Bloody Kisses, October Rust, World Coming Down). It is much more metal that their later work. Pete's vocals are very harsh and he sounds really ... off. He also screams here instead of sings. The music itself is much heavier and faster. It is still excellent music, though. Carnivore fans and Type O fans will probably like it. You will probably like it the most if you are into a heavy, thrashy metal sound rather than the soothing, slow gothic sound of their later work. In my opinion, it is great. peace
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 24, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Slow, Deep and Hard, one of the most controversial albums in (what was then) underground metal. Pete was going through a tough time with a female relation and his anger shows through brightly, clearly and explicitly. Unsuccessfully Coping and Xero Tolerance are two of the best break-up songs ever (as long as you don't take an axe to her like in XT). Those pale next to Prelude to Agony with contains a brilliant monastic chant early on. Der Untermensch is all about people who live off the government instead of working for a living and is filled with righteous indignation. The last track Gravitational Constant is about depression and suicide and is brilliant. Interesting notes about this album, Pete had to answer millions of questions about the anti-female slant of the album and he had to answer a million times that is wasn't about women in general, just about one he was very upset with and it came through (in fact provided most of the impetus for) the album. In Germany it was reported that death threats were issued and the right-wing factions accused him of being communist while the left-wingers called him a fascist. This comes through in Bloody Kisses (We Hate Everyone). This is a very strong album and while it is not as technically sound as Negative albums that come after, the raw energy and brutal honesty are captivating.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 20, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Type O Negative shows its metal/hardcore roots on its debut album, Slow Deep & Hard. Although its stripped down production, screeching guitars and raw lyrics will no doubt surprise fans who cut their teeth on the more melodic stylings of Bloody Kisses, October Rust and World Coming Down. SD&H is a highly original and honest album that thrives on pure energy: The 12min+ album opener screams about cheating girlfriends, der untermensh looks at those who subsist on welfare, xero tolerance fantasizes about killing the cheating girlfriend's new boyfriend, Prelude to Agony focuses on killing the ex-girlfriend, Glass Walls is a period of introspection and the album closer deals with suicide.
Type O Negative show that they eschew the need for typical arrangements (there are basically 5 songs within a song, and each song exceeds the 7min mark), and the need to be politcally correct (der untermensch was the German word used by the Nazis to describe the Jews ... Everything about this album is built on pure energy, that band leader, Peter Steele, says is not to be taken too seriously. While anger is a common theme in todays hard rock culture, SD&H is one of the very few albums that is actually filled with emotion and pain behind the music. SD&H also is able to combine very catchy melodies with hard and heavy music. Bottom Line: If you need to complete your Type O collection, don't delay in picking up Slow Deep & Hard
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Wheelchair Assassin on August 1, 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Type O Negative may be known now as an atmospheric doom metal outfit, but before going Gothic Peter Steele and company released this classic thrash album that smacked more of Peter's old band Carnivore than the band that recorded "Bloody Kisses" and "October Rust." Filled with fist-pumping, head-banging anthems for the angry and disaffected, "Slow, Deep and Hard" is surely one of metal's most unfairly neglected albums. It may not have the epic ambience of some of the band's later work, but "Slow, Deep and Hard" more than compensates with plenty of aggression and tongue-in-cheek (at least I think it's tongue-in-cheek) humor.

While bands like Metallica had made epic songs a staple of metal during the '80's, "Slow, Deep and Hard" boasts tracks so long it almost makes "Master of Puppets" look like a Ramones album. Angry, visceral thrash metal shares space with gloomy, atmospheric passages, pushing many of the songs on the album near or past the ten-minute mark. In its more intense moments, "Slow, Deep and Hard" is almost [very descriptive]: you'll be too busy banging your head and laughing at Peter's hilariously over-the-top lyrics to worry too much about little things like musicianship or artistic merit. During slower periods, Peter sounds suprisingly vulnerable and melancholic, with his doomy bass singing foreshadowing the direction Type O would take on "Bloody Kisses" and subsequent albums.

The album starts off in the best way possible with what may well be the best song in history, the twelve-plus-minute epic "unsuccessfully coping with the natural beauty of infidelity.
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