Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $4.07 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by Mind Traveler
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Slow Flowers: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm Hardcover – February 1, 2013


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$12.88
$10.14 $6.96

Frequently Bought Together

Slow Flowers: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm + The Flower Recipe Book
Price for both: $26.98

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
  • The Flower Recipe Book $14.10

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: St. Lynn's Press (February 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0983272689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983272687
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 7.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

From Debbie Arrington of the Sacramento Bee:
""The mother of the Slow Flower movement, Prinzing is making a personal crusade to encourage people to think about floral purchases the same way they may approach what they eat: Buy locally grown flowers or grow them yourself.""

From Ballamy Pailthorp, KPLU-FM (NPR affiliate):
""...an impassionaed advocate for a more sustainable flower industry.""

""Debra Prinzing inspires us to slow down and smell the flowers, especially those grown in our own backyards or by local flower farmers.
--Lara Spencer, ABC's Good Morning America lifestyle anchor and New York Times best-selling author of I Brake For Yard Sales.


From Craig Nakano, LA Times, February 25, 2013:
""When Debra Prinzing talks about ""Slow Flowers,"" the title of her new book, what's most striking is the extent to which concepts that sound so familiar and so logical also can seem so foreign. After all, how many times have we picked up flowers at Trader Joe's without asking ourselves: Are the blooms in season? Were they grown locally? Who produced them or where did they come from? You might find those kinds of sourcing questions answered on menus but rarely on store-bought bouquets.""

From the Author

From the INTRODUCTION to Debra Prinzing's "Slow Flowers"
My 52 Weeks of Local Flowers
One of the joys of gardening is to step out my back door and clip a few sprigs to bring inside. The day's prettiest blooms and just-unfurled leaves -- gathered simply into a bunch and displayed in a jar of water -- provide everything I need to start the day. The tiny arrangement graces my kitchen counter or brightens a spot by the keyboard, connecting me with the natural world even when I'm "stuck" indoors, away from my beloved garden.
Is this floral design?
I guess it is, but like many avid gardeners, I certainly never considered myself a florist. After all, despite hundreds of hours of horticulture training, I never once studied the art of flowers, other than one weekend class on liturgical arrangements that I took with my friend Britt Olson, who is an Episcopal priest. Floral design was an entirely different sort of activity for which I wasn't qualified (I thought). I'm a writer and a lover of plants, but not an artist.
I have written about floral design for years, interviewing top florists around the country for articles in magazines like Seattle Bride, Romantic Homes and Sunset. I loved reporting those stories, and I have to admit feeling a twinge of jealousy as I listened to flower artists answer questions about their style and technique, their use of botanicals and vessels - and especially their inspiration. 
I have spent my life observing and writing about creative people. But I didn't really believe that I was one of them! I was the classic journalist: a detached outsider documenting what she heard and saw.
Yet writers are sponges, and we are driven by an insatiable, need-to-know curiosity. In pursuit of our stories, we can't help but absorb knowledge about myriad topics, taught to us by generous subjects whose own passion is infectious. That's exactly what happened to me while story-gathering for my most recent project, The 50 Mile Bouquet. I loved shaping the narrative about the many talented individuals who are part of the local flower movement.
While working on that book with photographer David Perry, my own bouquet-making activity was on the rise. I was beginning to see the gardens around me in a new way -- in all four seasons rather than only during July when the perennials peaked. The palette of possibilities expanded greatly, thanks to my interviews with the gifted flower farmers and designers profiled in The 50 Mile Bouquet. 
My spontaneous bouquet-making gestures soon became a weekly ritual. I discovered that just like designing a container garden or a display border, there is great satisfaction in choosing flowers and companion elements and assembling them into a beautiful composition in just the right vase.
I often photographed my design process. Documenting each step seemed like a good idea, either for my own reference, for a blog post or to illustrate a future lecture. 
One day in the fall of 2011, I had a brainstorm that led to the creation of this book, Slow Flowers. I jotted down some ideas, including this one:
There's a common misconception that it's impossible, or at least tricky, to find enough beautiful ingredients in one's own garden or region during certain times of the year for creating interesting seasonal floral arrangements. Taking the Do-it-Yourself designer's point of view, I want to disprove that notion by making bouquet-a-week -- all year long. 
My goal was to inspire others to create personal bouquets with what's at hand, if only they begin to see what's around them with new eyes.
I launched the project in 2011 and continued it for 52 weeks. As each season unfolded, so, too, did my passion for floral design. My experiment turned into a month-by-month book of ideas and inspiration for gardeners and DIY floral designers.
WHY SLOW FLOWERS?
The idea for the title of this book emerged organically. We had used the term "Slow Flowers" as part of the marketing for The 50 Mile Bouquet, and to our surprise, nearly every major newspaper and magazine that reviewed the book picked up on it as a reference to a cultural shift in consumer attitudes toward local, seasonal and sustainably-grown flowers.
So when editor Cathy Dees and publisher Paul Kelly and I got serious about a book title, Slow Flowers seemed like the "just-right" description of my one-year floral design experiment. Thanks to the culinary pioneers who popularized the Slow Food movement, it now seems like you can put "Slow" in front of any term to convey a different philosophy or approach to that subject. When I say the phrase, there are those who immediately understand Slow Flowers to mean: I have made a conscious choice. 
My blooms, buds, leaves and vines are definitely in season; not, for example, grown elsewhere in the world during the wet, cold winter months in my hometown of Seattle. So come December and January, my commitment to sourcing locally-grown floral materials sends me to the conifer boughs, colored twigs, berry-producing evergreens and the occasional greenhouse-grown rose, lily or tulip just to satisfy my hunger for a bloom. 
Slow Flowers reflects life lived in the slower lane. My family, friends and professional colleagues know that it's almost impossible for me to do anything slowly. I'm the queen of multitasking; I just can't help myself. There are too many exciting opportunities (or bright, shiny objects) that command my interest. But this "year in flowers" was altogether different. I can only compare it to the practice of praying or meditating. I didn't realize that those few hours I spent each week, gathering and choosing petals and stems, arranging them in a special vessel, and then figuring out where and how to capture the finished design through my camera lens, would be so personally enriching. 
I used all my senses. Unplugged, away from electronic distractions, I studied the form, line, texture, subtle color and utter uniqueness of each stem. What a gift to slow down and experience the moment. I don't know much about Ikebana, but I understand that silence and contemplation of nature are part of its practice. I experienced something similar. Slow Flowers forced me to work at a decidedly different pace as I embraced creativity, fearlessly. 
I learned about my own preferences, design style and ability to look at the world of floral ingredients in an unconventional way. I learned that I really am a floral designer. Like me, you don't have to earn a certificate from the London School of Floral Design to create seasonally-inspired bouquets. You can find local blooms in your or your friends' garden, or from the fields, meadows and farm stands of local flower growers. Each bouquet tells a story about one moment in time, about Grandmother's cherished flower vase or the fleeting memory that returns with a whiff of lavender or lilac. That's one of the intangible gifts of bringing flowers into our lives. 
I love the old-fashioned definition of a Florist, appropriately portrayed in a flower shop sign I noticed on a visit to Chicago: "One in the business of raising or selling flowers and ornamental plants."
That description underscores my new-found belief that if you grow flowers and ornamental plants, you can also arrange them. 
Gardeners are especially qualified in the art of floral design. After all, we have an intimate relationship with our plants, their bloom cycle, their natural form and character - and their seasonality. We also know what colors and textures we like when combined in the landscape. A vase can be just a little garden, its contents gathered and arranged to please the eye.
So give it a try. Design a bouquet. Channel your inner floral designer and begin your own year with Slow Flowers. 
 

More About the Author

Debra Prinzing is a Seattle- and Los Angeles-based outdoor living expert who writes and lectures on gardens and home design. She has a background in textiles, journalism, landscape design and horticulture. A frequent speaker for botanical garden, horticultural society and flower show audiences, Debra is also a regular radio and television guest.
Her six books include "The 50 Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers" (St. Lynn's Press, 2012); Garden Writers Association Gold Award-winning "Stylish Sheds and Elegant Hideaways" (Clarkson-Potter/Random House, 2008) and "The Abundant Garden" (2005). Her newest book, "SLOW FLOWERS: Four Seasons of Locally Grown Bouquets from the Garden, Meadow and Farm," will be published February 1, 2013. It features Debra's floral designs, writing and photography.
Debra is a contributing garden editor for Better Homes & Gardens and her feature stories on architecture and design appear regularly in the Los Angeles Times' Home section. She is also a contributing editor to Garden Design magazine and writes for top shelter and consumer publications, including Country Gardens, Horticulture, Fine Gardening, Organic Gardening, Cottages & Bungalows, Metropolitan Home, Landscape Architecture, Sunset, Alaska Airlines Magazine, Old House Interiors, Seattle Homes & Lifestyles and Romantic Homes, among others. Her website and blog: www.debraprinzing.com.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 15 customer reviews
The photos are beautiful.
Olivia T. Olivas-pearce
Thank you Debra Prinzing for this wonderful example of "going local" when it comes to flowers.
Kasey C.
She also includes design and flower care tips throughout the book.
Carol J. Michel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Ferda on March 23, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I loved the arrangements in this book! They are natural-looking and seasonal and look like they would be able to be put together by anyone-- even those of us without any floral design training. But many of them use flowers that are sourced from local flower growers. If you are located on the west coast as the author is, this is do-able. For most people, like me in the midwest, these types of growers don't exist.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carol J. Michel on June 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Slow Flowers is a treasure for flower lovers and anyone who wants to enjoy flowers inside. If you want to be inspired to arrange your own bouquets from locally sourced, seasonal flowers, get this book. Debra shows how you can have flowers 52 weeks of the year and tells the story of how each bouquet came to be. She also includes design and flower care tips throughout the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert Warchola on May 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I hope this "slow flowers" movement keeps going! I would like to see the floral business continue to grow in a more ecologically responsible way. This little book will help it along for sure.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Olivia T. Olivas-pearce on February 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love to pick flowers in the garden! But what do I know about arranging them in a pretty display? Nothing! I have no creative talents. In Slow Flowers, I found absolutely wonderful "recipes" for flower displays. Suitable for Downton Abbey's next smart soiree! Ms Prinzing has once again given us inspiration for our garden. Not only to pick but what to plant for future displays. The photos are beautiful.The downside? I feel deprived until her next book comes out. I am a Prinzing junkey!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Nelson on July 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
An arrangement each week, with fresh material from the yard, friends gardens, local sources! For a whole year! Amazing eye-opening how to book. Loved it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anna K on May 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is a fantastic little book! I love the colors and variety of flowers used! It has spurned me to make my own garden inspired creations!

The emphasis on using locally available product is just such a bonus! I strive to reduce my carbon footprint and buy local at every opportunity! Thank you Debra!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Garden fanatic on February 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This wonderful little book will give you fabulous ideas as to how to combine seasonal flowers and foliage from your own garden for lovely displays. For the winter arrangements, she supplements with a few store bought flowers to augment your own branches and boughs, but almost all of the rest of the plant material can be home grown. It also gives many ideas as to the varieties of plants to grow in your garden that you may have overlooked.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Prince on February 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
UPS just dropped my book at the door - what a welcome break from work on an overcast, drizzly Seattle day. Filled with 52 recipes to make beautiful garden bouquets without fuss and without fancy out of season flowers flown in from another continent - gets my creative juices going - and helps me plan my summer plantings so that I can pick and display what I've grown myself. Filled with photographs on the side opposite the "recipe" of completed bouquests - some bouquet recipes pages have an additional phot - really colorful - will fit in my purse when I travel, though I think it will sleep next to me on the nightstand for a while - another unique idea from Debra - I'm already planning to give it as a Mother's Day gift - to the mom's in my life!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?