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Slugging It Out in Japan: An American Major Leaguer in the Tokyo Outfield Mass Market Paperback – March 3, 1992


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (March 3, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451170768
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451170767
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,475,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

As one of the gaijin (foreign) baseball players of Whiting's earlier book, You Gotta Have Wa ( LJ 5/1/89), Cromartie tells of his seven tempestuous years with the Tokyo Giants. "Cro," as they called him, fought the Wa --the demanding team discipline Japanese baseball teams expect from their players--and in return was resented as a highly paid foreigner and an independent black. Finally coming to terms with the Japanese methods, he won acceptance and learned to appreciate the nation's way of life. Recommended where You Gotta Have Wa attracted adult and YA readers.
- Morey Berger, formerly with Monmouth Cty. Lib., Manalapan, N.J.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Warren Cromartie was accepted by Japan as a gaijin because he accepted Japan himself. Thru his book you will feel his ups and downs while playing for Japan's highest profile baseball team: The Kyojin's aka The Yomiuri Giants. I strongly believe that Cro stuck out 6 years in Tokyo, not because of the big bucks but his bonding and friendship with the legendary Sadaharu Oh. Thank you Cro, for sharing your experience and journey.
Don't delay if you are a baseball fan, get the book today!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. K. Kelley on February 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cromartie played long enough in Japan to actually develop moments of affection for the experience, a statement not normally made of foreign players. His description of the normalcy of race prejudice there will stun people from countries where such prejudice is not considered acceptable. He tells a lot about Japanese life as well as Japanese baseball from the perspective of a man who earned the respect of his Japanese teammates as a leader. I find his commentary very revealing and strongly recommend this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas R.W. Henning on January 25, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Warren Cromartie had one of the most enduring baseball careers of any North American to have played in Japan. His book is a detailed insight into his life and baseball journey in the U.S. and Japan.

Cromartie may strike some readers as at times presenting a bleating disposition. However, he is humble enough to admit that his attitude is influenced by his own egotism at times.

His story draws light to the fact that baseball across the world has its own local brand, and whilst he found Japan at times racially and culturally challenging, he was able to learn many great new skills and attain considerable success from his effort.

Nicholas R.W. Henning - Australian Baseball Author
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ohmysohopeless on August 30, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I grew up watching Warren Cromartie play for the Tokyo Yomiuri Giants during the late `80s. Cromartie was one of very few gaijin players who left a great impact, not only by the way he played the game, but also by his cocky attitude and behavior. For the Japanese media who love to stereotype American players as brashly self-arrogant, lazy, and powerful, Cromartie was such a perfect fit. Of course, they would not report on his side of story, this biography may be of a greater interest for those who viewed him as a gaijin those days. To me, the reader may miss the most interesting points if she just reads this book just as an account of "bizarre" experiences that an American went through in one of the most exotic places in the world.

With the presence of such colorful personalities as the manager Sadaharu Oh (whose career homerun record of 868 surpasses the American counterpart), his teammates, and old-fashioned traditionalists who would be labeled downright racists in many other civilized nations, the story never seems to bore the reader.

Unlike many other player biographies ghost written by mediocre sport writers, this is surprisingly an engaging book. Robert Whiting does a great job of incorporating his own views on cultural disparities between Japan and America into Cromartie's endeavor as a gaijin player. Many opinions expressed in the book overlap Whiting's other works on baseball, such as "You Gotta Have Wa" and "The Chrysanthemum and the Bad," but "Slugging It Out in Japan" is probably the most emotionally involved pieces of all.
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