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Small Earthquake in Chile: New, Revised, and Expanded Edition of the Classic Account of Allende's Chile Paperback – August 1, 1990


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Paperback, August 1, 1990
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (August 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140134476
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140134476
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,273,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
I have an immense respect for the works of Alistair Horne. I've read A Savage War of Peace: Algeria 1954-1962 (New York Review Books Classics) twice, as well as his trilogy on the Franco-German conflicts The Fall of Paris: The Siege and the Commune 1870-71, "The Price of Glory, Verdun, 1916" and To Lose a Battle: France 1940, and three others. I am in good, if widely disparate company: George W. Bush, the journalist Robert Fisk, Ariel Sharon, Nelson Mandela, and numerous others have referenced and admired his work. This book, however, is a dramatic outlier from his life's core achievements.

As Horne indicates in his preface, the title is derived from a competition among the sub-editors of "The Times" (of London) to find the most boring headline, with the winner, "by a comfortable margin" being: "Small Earthquake in Chile; Not Many Dead." He used the headline to underscore the general indifference, and lack of interest in the Anglo-Saxon world (even that term is a bit dated) to events in Latin America. This often translated into having one correspondent for the entire continent. Yet, Horne appears unaware of the irony of his trip to South America. Much like that lone correspondent, he stops off for unspecified briefs period in Columbia, Peru, and Bolivia, and then writes a chapter each on his insights, before he arrives in Chile, when Salvador Allende was in power.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Army Veteran USA on July 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
Horne consistently writes with a focus on the human element and the tugs on the emotions, even including his better known works of military history. This account is a far more balanced and nuanced account of the 1970 election, pre-Pinochet, than is normally obtained in English by most writers, who invariably are very sympathetic to Allende but never to the opposition, which were the vast majority of voters. Highly recommend, if obviously dated. Subjective "national characteristics" narrative may be questionable to some readers, but it does not denigrate overall value of work.
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