Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $3.91 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Small Victories: The Real... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Small Victories: The Real World of a Teacher, Her Students, and Their High School Paperback – May 23, 1991


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.08
$5.38 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$14.08 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Small Victories: The Real World of a Teacher, Her Students, and Their High School + Rethinking School Reform: Views from the Classroom
Price for both: $27.47

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (May 23, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060920874
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060920876
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #639,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In 1988, Jessica Siegel taught a predominantly Hispanic, black and Asian class at Seward Park High School on Manhattan's lower East Side. Here, Freedman follows Siegel through "small victories" such as encouraging college aspirations, and one primary defeat: she left the job at the school year's end. PW called this an "unsentimental yet moving portrait."
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

This engrossing narrative of one year in the life of New York City's Seward Park High School will bring "bravos" from all readers. Freedman's approach in depicting the daily activities of one teacher--Jessica Siegel--and the students, faculty, parents, and administrators who touch her life is forthright and honest. Siegel's self-doubts, triumphs, and unfailing desire to lead her students to help themselves out of a life of poverty is all the more inspiring because, even though the victories may be small, she returns each year to meet the same situations, with new faces. While Tracy Kidder's Among Schoolchildren ( LJ 8/89) depicts similar situations with elementary school children, Small Victories is a more powerful, damning indictment of the intellectual, racial, and educational prejudice wrought by the "system." Perhaps Freedman's title contains one answer to educational reform--"small victories" won by dedicated teachers, with the emphasis on "dedicated." A memorable book.
- Annelle R. Huggins, Memphis State Univ. Lib.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "amandaagnes" on June 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found Small Victories to be a text of incredible value for the even-handed way that it lays out the profound problems facing the New York City Public School system-- from the exhaustingly ponderous beaurocracy and latent racism of the Board of Education to the extreme poverty and violence that surrounds the students all of the time. Freedman cuts back and forth between sections of personal narrative and the political and social history of the Lower East Side so that you really gain an understanding of the way that many of these problem has been created and maintained by the education system over such a long period of time that overcoming them may be quite difficult. The story of Jessica Siegal, the teacher profiled in the book, is one of amazing courage and dedication that sinks into a depressing story of insurmountable obstacles such as uninterested politicians, bitter, lazy educators, and rampant poverty. The small victories that she achieves are incredible and important but are so far from remedying the very real problems of the school system, which short changes so many thousands of students in so many ways, that it is hard not to be left with a sinking feeling that the large failures of the system that surrounds Siegal just might swallow up the pride and drive off the teachers like her who perservere. Though this may be incredibly depressing it is a story that needs to be told and I applaud Freedman for tackling such a difficult topic with such a keen eye and unrelenting dedication to the truth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By NY musician on December 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
I was very moved by this book which intertwined the stories of the lives of a dedicated teacher and her lower East Side students, many of whom faced giant obstacles to their academic success. I particularly appreciated the author's smooth narrative style, which contributed to his effectiveness in painting real lives. I was also grateful for the complete absence of a "preachy" tone, or a self-righteous attitude sometimes found in books on this subject.
With the many stories in today's newspapers about NYC firing yet another school chancellor, students failing standardized tests, etc, this story, with its detailed descriptions of daily life in the classroom of a typical NY high school, and the colorful personalities of the school administrators, faculty, and the students they seek to educate, made a real impression. Not just statistics or hysterical arguments, but real lives, passions, and burnouts.
Small Victories was very helpful to me to read in my effort to develop a more detailed understanding of the public education system and the problems facing young people today. An excellent story, cooly told with a powerful shape and impact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
This moving and engaging book is the written form of the movie STAND AND DELIVER!
Well, not exactly, its a different plot, a different set of students, but its theme is similar. It depicts dedicated, caring, and truly amazing teachers at their very best bringing hope to students who have came from a neglected, hopeless, situation. The talented journalist Samuel Freedman has decided to tell us what life is for the students of Seward Park High School in NY city. During the 87-88 school year he literally trails around English intstructour Jessica Seigel and from his observations hes has compiled Small Victories. These are students who have come from families to poor pay rent for a house with working sewage, often abused at home, many immigrants, homeless and being shuttled between boarding homes and shelters. And yet, the talented, but moreover dedicated, instucours -- especially Jessica Siegel -- can turn many of these students around and help them see their dreams. How, can, form one of t he lowest 10% schools in US 90 % of graduates go on to higher education colleges? From a school where people come as their last choice, they come here knkowing they are "Built to Fail". Samuel Freedman takes us on spectcular journey thru Seward park high as we get to know the students crowded 30-40 per class, the teachers underpaid and overworked, a poor and underfunded high school, and a marvelous feat. This has been one of the most fascinating books I'v ever read. Indeed, though originally a college assignment, it has truly transformed my view of the "other end" of the world. Those who dont have what we take for granted -- a nice suburban home, money for clothes, heating, and food. How then can they be expected to even THINK about school...
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rick on March 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
Over the past quarter century a slew of teacher memoirs have appeared on the market. Some have been enlightening, some occasionally useful, and some a bit self-serving. But the subject of this account did not choose to speak for herself--nor did she seek to have her story told. For this reason alone the narrative "case study" that ensued when NYT's journalist Freedman walked in the shadow of this teacher is both believable and compelling.

What the reader gains is insight into the daily life of a teacher struggling to make a real difference in the lives of disadvantaged kids. I could relate, having spent a decade teaching in a similar setting, and therefore recommend it for education faculty to share with preservice teachers (of English) or instructors of courses on contemporary American education and its socio-cultural contexts. Moreover, the profiles of individual students from a range of ethnic backgrounds gives the reader insight into their home lives and how their lack of social capital, save for one caring teacher, nearly prevented them from higher academic aspirations. That being said, I take umbrage with the tired accusation, levied in the editor's review that the system is solely to blame. Many bureaucrats work against nearly insurmountable odds; some are former teachers themselves who burned out along the way. And the families--especially the parents but also the students involved--must shoulder some of the responsibility for what they do or do not achieve. This simple reality is often conveniently overlooked by the finger-pointers.

All in all, this is an easy narrative read with poignant depictions without the gratuitous sentimentality to go with it. I'm sure the teacher in focus must have been satisfied with the journalist's effort to sketch her life as an educator.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?