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Smart Health Choices Paperback – September 1, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Hammersmith Press; Rev. and Updated Ed edition (September 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905140177
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905140176
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,634,068 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Professor Les Irwig is Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Sydney, Australia, and an internationally renowned authority on evidence-based medicine. Judy Irwig brings the perspective of the health care consumer. She devotes a large part of her career to writing and recording songs for children, conveying important messages about relationships, self-respect, and respect for the environment. Dr Lyndal Trevena is Senior Lecturer in the School of Public Health at the University of Sydney, Australia, and a member of the Sydney Health Decision Group as well as being an experienced General Practitioner. Melissa Sweet is a journalist who has been reporting on health and medical issues for more than 15 years.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Danielle Joffe on December 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
Every time I took my son to the doctor I came home with four or five prescriptions. I had no idea what the side effects were, or if the scripts were necessary or effective. This book helped me to do my own research. It is clear and simple without being patronising, and equips the lay person to better understand medical science - especially the key words "evidence based medicine" and the importance of clinical trials.
Now, when friends tell me I must try a particular supplement (usually expensive) I search the Cochrane Library and research the claims made. I can ask doctors questions and feel that I can make better decisions about my family's health.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jane Berman on January 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
Finally, I feel empowered regarding my health choices. I no longer feel passive in the face of health professionals, but am able to take a step back, ask the right questions and deliberate the options without taking anything for granted. After all, it's MY health, isn't it?
While the book is written in clear accessible language, it is intelligently presented and doesn't talk down to the reader.
Highly recommended.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jane Muncke on February 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
Read this book if you want to make your own decisions about your health, or if you want to challenge your professional perspective on health decisions. This is a user friendly book thanks to its clear structure and good introduction.
Target audience
The target audience is both consumers and health professionals. This book gives an interesting perspective on how evidence-based medicine can challenge - and change - conventional health care practice, and is thus a must for any professional interested in being up-to-date. It also takes the health consumer perspective, and gives useful advice on how to put meaning behind health claims, but also helps the reader understand that leaving the doctor's without a prescription is not necessarily a bad thing. This book is NOT a "do-it-yourself-guide" that intends to replace your doctor. It is actually more a kind of relationship guide that will help you develop a satisfying partnership with your health practitioner, to take account of your personal preferences and make health decisions with the information from evidence-based medicine: "The book is based on the philosophy that consumers have a right to develop a health partnership with their practitioner, so that all decisions take account of their personal preferences, as well as being based on accurate information about the beneficial and harmful effects of interventions. We hope that it will enlighten and empower those who may be feeling disgruntled with their healthcare, or who are confused by all the conflicting opinions and information that they are given, or who feel that their practitioners are not taking their viewpoints into account." (p. 7)
Evidence-based medicine
It is against human nature to think probabilistically, hence statistics mean very little to us.
Read more ›
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