Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $8.32 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: SHIPS FROM AMAZON! Your purchase helps support libraries across the US! No rips/tears/writing on the pages. Shows minor wear from general use on cover edges and corners. Otherwise in excellent condition!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory Hardcover – September 15, 2014

4.7 out of 5 stars 797 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.63
$9.45 $7.09

Progressing Through Grief: Guided Exercises to Understand Your Emotions and Recover from Loss by Stephanie Jose, LMHC, LCAT
Progressing Through Grief
An interactive workbook flexible enough to meet you where you are today in your journey towards healing, with compassionate coping methods, guided exercises and prompted journaling. Learn more | See author page
$16.63 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory
  • +
  • Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
Total price: $26.20
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Caitlin Doughty takes you to places you didn’t know you wanted to go. Fascinating, funny, and so very necessary, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes reveals exactly what's wrong with modern death denial.” (Bess Lovejoy, author of Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses)

“Alternately heartbreaking and hilarious, fascinating and freaky, vivid and morbid, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes is witty, sharply drawn, and deeply moving. Like a poisonous cocktail, Caitlin Doughty's memoir intoxicates and enchants even as it encourages you to embrace oblivion; she breathes life into death.” (Dodai Stewart, deputy editor of Jezebel.com)

“[Doughty’s] sincere, hilarious, and perhaps life-altering memoir is a must-read for anyone who plans on dying.” (Katharine Fronk - Booklist, Starred review)

“Caitlin Doughty is best known for her YouTube series Ask a Mortician, and she brings the same charisma and drollery to her essay collection Smoke Gets in Your Eyes. Think Sloane Crosley meets Six Feet Under.” (Kevin Nguyen - Grantland)

“Entertaining and thought-provoking.” (Julia Jenkins - Shelf Awareness)

“Demonically funny dispatches.” (O Magazine)

“Morbid and illuminating.” (Entertainment Weekly)

“A book as graphic and morbid as this one could easily suck its readers into a bout of sorrow, but Doughty―a trustworthy tour guide through the repulsive and wondrous world of death―keeps us laughing.” (Rachel Lubitz - Washington Post)

“Doughty reels you in with wonderful anecdotes about her work. Intermixed with the humor is a love of life that will make you reconsider how our culture treats the dead.” (San Francisco Chronicle)

About the Author

Caitlin Doughty is a licensed mortician and the host and creator of the "Ask a Mortician" web series. She founded the death acceptance collective The Order of the Good Death and cofounded Death Salon. She lives in Los Angeles.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (September 15, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393240231
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393240238
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.9 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (797 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By sb-lynn TOP 500 REVIEWER on August 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I had trouble coming up with a title for this review that wouldn't turn off anyone because I think this is an important book and I hope many, many people read it.

The author of this book has been fascinated with the subject of death and dying since she was a young girl and witnessed the death of another young girl who took a fall at a local mall. For years afterwards she was filled with angst and trepidation and described herself as "functionally morbid."

When she went to college she got a degree in medieval history with a focus on death and rituals and afterwards got a job working at a mortuary - the Westwind Cremation & Burial.

This book describes her experiences facing death straight on and how it actually eased her own existential angst and made her better able to appreciate and enjoy her own life. We not only read (detailed) descriptions of what happens to bodies in a crematorium, we also learn about other mortuary practices and what really happens behind the scenes.

The author makes such an important case against our own culture's tendency to avoid death (and aging!) and to try to avoid its very existence. She points out how in the past and how even today - in other cultures - family and neighbors took care of their dead and witnessed dying all the time. She points out how important that is to accepting our own death and by doing so, make it less frightening and esoteric.

Lest I give the impression that this is a depressing book, for me it was not. There are so many laugh-out-loud moments and when I finished the last page I found myself with a little less of my own existential angst.

This book reminded me a lot of science writer Mary Roach and I feel like I'd love to hang out and be friends with both of them. Ms.
Read more ›
3 Comments 205 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I found this book to be a refreshing, unsentimental and honest look at the way Americans deal with death - which is to say, not very effectively. Author Doughty spent time working in a crematory and later went through mortuary school, and her memoir is by turns darkly funny, fascinating, disgusting, and touching. I have a lot of admiration for anyone who works in a crematory, does embalming, or deals with mourning relatives - it's very challenging work and I couldn't do it.

In addition to her own story, Doughty skillfully weaves in a history of embalming, American funeral traditions, other cultures' funeral rites and beliefs about death, and how the mortuary industry works, and it's all quite interesting, if sometimes a little difficult to read. If you're squeamish, it might be best to steer clear, as Doughty spares no description in her quest to open the reader's eyes to what really happens to our bodies after we die and how we can best understand and deal with death more honestly and directly than we currently do.

I don't know if I should say I "enjoyed" this book the way I would enjoy a novel, but I certainly appreciated it, especially since I have gone through the deaths of family members and am getting on in years myself, and I feel it's important to explore and be able to talk about our own ends openly, rather than tiptoeing around the subject.

I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the mortuary/funeral industry, medical students (doctors in this country don't deal with death very well), and anyone who, like me, wants to understand more about death and how to plan for it.
Comment 92 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was really torn about how to review this. I have a background in emergency medicine, so I understand that a sense of humor and looking at things in a non-serious way is what helps people get through difficult takes. I remember one time a reporter was riding a-long with us and we were dispatched to an accident. The reporter asked how I felt or something and I said, "I hope it turns into a vehicle rescue!" I ended up getting in trouble for saying that, though those who have worked in EMS/FIRE/POLICE totally understand where I'm coming from. It's not that I wished harm on anyone, it's just that I hoped the call would be challenging. So, it was with that sense of understanding I thought I was going to enjoy Doughty's trip into the world of what happens when EMS or doctors or whomever can't save a person.
I was not ready.
I only read a few chapters and had to put it down. Perhaps its my age (though I'm not that old!) I am facing mortality possibly sooner than I surely thought I would. And reading about what goes on behind closed doors, even though Doughty seems to be a great storyteller, I can't bring myself to finish this.
I'm giving this four stars because I certainly can't fault the author for my own lack of misjudgment, but not 5 stars because perhaps if she had written it in a...less witty (though I totally understand and appreciate her being herself!) and more oh...gah, I don't know, tender? way, I might have been able to swallow my fear and plod on.
As a Vine reviewer, I am obligated to leave a review, and I've never had this situation occur (and I feel dreadful about it!). I probably would have done well to read the first few chapters prior to choosing this, and I think it's a good recommendation for those considering reading Smoke...you might think you're ready to read about death, but once you open that door, you might wish you had kept it closed.
Bravo to Doughty and those who do the jobs they do.
Comment 125 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory