Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Smoke Signals Paperback – July 1, 1998


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.88 $0.84


--This text refers to the Library Binding edition.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Amazon Storybuilder, a new tool for screenwriters. Build movie and series outlines with digital notecards. Try now for free.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; 1st edition (July 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786883928
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786883929
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #119,094 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sherman Alexie is a Spokane/Coeur d'Alene Indian. He earned a 1994 Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Writers' Award, was a citation winner for the PEN/Hemingway Award for the Best First Book of Fiction, and was named one of Granta's Best of the Young American Novelists. Alexie is the author of The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven , which served as the basis for a film that premiered at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. His book Reservation Blues won him the Before Columbus Foundation's American Book Award. Alexie's several books of poetry include I Would Steal Horses, Old Shirts & New Skins, First Indian on the Moon , and The Summer of Black Widows.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)
#49 in Books > Teens
#49 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 14 customer reviews
Beautifully acted, and some very funny moments too.
trailsinger
It makes a lot of sense inside the story, it makes the contrast between the two characters more meaningful and I'm very sorry it disappeared from the film.
JazzFeathers
It was rather like Laurel & Hardy, straight and funny guy tactics, rarely seen today without one character overpowering the other.
dcchambers@hotmail.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By WichacpiHoskila VINE VOICE on December 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
I work as a psychotherapist with adolescents and young adults. I use "Smoke Signals" with them by assigning them to rent and view the movie, which is always enjoyable because it's witty, humorous, wise, and significant. The movie poses two essential questions: 1) If someone else has mistreated, hurt, abandoned, or disrespected you, is it possible to forgive them if they've NEVER asked forgiveness, never done anything to "put it right," never returned in atonement to undo the damage, and never begtun to deserve it? And 2) if it *is* possible--and it may not be--SHOULD you? Because if you do, doesn't that just make you a willing victim by letting them "get away" with what they did, and pretending the relationship is okay again?
Victor lives in the tension of this dilemma. As a 12-year-old youth, he witnessed the effects of alcohol on his family. His father vascillated between being loving and instantly "turning" to become hostile, violent, and humiliating to the young boy. Victor finds himself becoming more deeply embarrassed by his family's domestic abuse and alcohol use, even defiantly scolding his own father that his favorite Indian is "Nobody...nobody...nobody!"
Victor's mother awakens the next morning to see Victor angrily smashing his father's beer bottles on the back of his father's picup truck (the two things he believes his father loves more than him), and the epiphany stuns the mother, who insists on an immediate end to family drunkenness. Proving Victor's fears true, the father--forced to choose between alcohol and family--flees the family, and never returns. It is within that unchanged arrangement that his father dies, 8 years later, having never returned home.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
To me this book had an effect it showed a normal life style of an a native american instead of a regular drunk indian. This book does not hide anything it gives all expressive and shows lots of details of how the real world is.Not only is this book a reference for my class, but also a look back in my history. Victor has a mirror reflection in my life because of the way he was raised. With all the alcohol and verbal abuse it probably reflects on most peoples life, if not it will most definetly make a change in the future. Alexi is a very good writer and i hope to meet him, and i wish he can come out with another book like that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By dcchambers@hotmail.com on February 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
Having seen this movie as a preview on another video, the subject was intriguing. The storyline was a breath of fresh air. The unfolding of the details of the common bond the two friends shared and the understanding of the father's behavior the son came to understand following his death was superbly done.
I found the constant talking of the one friend, although bordering on nerve-racking, was actually humorous in nature and the character was one to love. It was rather like Laurel & Hardy, straight and funny guy tactics, rarely seen today without one character overpowering the other.
I would highly recommend this to the younger set and young adult males who are having problems with relations with their fathers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
It should be noted that this screenplay is drawn from Alexie's short story collection "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven." The movie, the book and the screenplay are the work of a writer of the first water ... more power to Sherman Alexie!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By wasque@mindspring.com on July 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
Based on his story entitled "This is what it means to say Phoenix, Arizona," Sherman Alexie's first screenplay expands, with grace and precision, the ideas presented in the short story. The movie is excellent, and the screenplay (impeccably executed by the actors/actresses) contributes to this, through both its jokes and its image-invoking monologues, which give Alexie's characters the infinite depth that, as real people, they deserve.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By trailsinger on September 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
Every now and then I find a book or a movie, ostensibly about a culture not my own, that does more than educate me; it reaches into my heart and shows me what we share instead of where we differ. This movie was one of those experiences. Anyone who has had a difficult relationship with their father will relate to this story. Beautifully acted, and some very funny moments too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on January 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
Not surprisingly, as in any culture, there are many voices speaking for and about American Indians, representing them from many points of view. Alexie's is one, and the director of "Smoke Signals," Chris Eyre, is another. Reading the extensive notes at the end of this screenplay, where Alexie describes the creative decisions that went into the making of the movie, you can see how each of them pushed for a different vision of the material. And the end result is a moving and humorous film about damage done and the journey that leads to healing - a theme certainly appropriate to a story about American Indians but also relevant to people of all cultures.

The debate among Alexie's readers is expressed dramatically in the movie, "The Business of Fancydancing," in which a writer who makes a career for himself outside the reservation (not unlike Alexie himself) is received coldly by old friends who feel that he's betrayed his people. The violence in that film (against a stranded white tourist) is a darker vision of Indian rage, the seeds of which are represented in the character of Victor, in "Smoke Signals." Looking at just these two stories from the same author, you can see something of the competing points of view that can produce either praise or derision for this film, where "It's a good day to die" is wryly transposed into the wonky observation, "It's a good day to be indigenous."

I can think of really only one reason for reading this book. For screenwriters, it reveals how a screenplay is transformed in the process of making a movie, in this case by the director, the performers, Miramax's Harvey Weinstein, preview audiences, and in particular the editor. Scenes were shifted or eliminated, and dialogue has been added to patch over some of these structural changes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?