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Smokin' Joe: The Autobiography of a Heavyweight Champion of the World, Smokin' Joe Frazier Hardcover – March 1, 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 213 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan General Reference; First Edition edition (March 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 002860847X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0028608471
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #195,305 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Frazier was born in 1944 in rural South Carolina, one of 13 children of a father who also boasted of 13 other kids born out of wedlock. Unable to adjust to life in the South, Frazier went to New York City at age 15 and then to Philadelphia, where eventually a syndicate of businessmen backed him in the ring. He won an Olympic gold medal in 1964 and, after Muhammad Ali was stripped of his title as heavyweight champion for refusing military induction during the Vietnam War, Frazier was named champion in 1970. The following year, he defeated the reinstated Ali and reigned until 1973, when he lost his title to George Foreman. Once a friend of Ali, he became an enemy after a steady barrage of insults from "The Louisville Lip," and it's noteworthy that he always refers to Ali in these pages as Cassius Clay (his pre-Muslim name). Frazier has never ceased to work, nor has he lost faith in the American dream, so his autobiography, written with prize-winning boxing journalist Berger, may prove inspirational to young people. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

''Frazier has never ceased to work, nor has he lost faith in the American dream, so his autobiography, written with prize-winning boxing journalist Berger, [will be] inspirational to young people.'' --Publishers Weekly --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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I enjoyed the criticism of Muhammad Ali Frazier displayed.
"big_talka"
There should be a statue at the top of the Philadelphia steps of the great Joe Frazier, the real heavyweight champion of the world, not some actor.
John T. Noctor
Ali was great at a lot of things, and one of those things was being an irresponsible, loudmouth jerk.
M. G Watson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Tony Ukena on October 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First things first: I am a huge Muhammad Ali fan; and, I am a huge Joe Frazier fan. On top of that, I am fascinated by the lives of boxers. It seems that to become a great boxer, one must go through a bitter struggle to get to the top of that profession.

Like other great boxers, "Smokin'" Joe Frazier had a hard life, and one at which one wrong turn at the crossroads could have derailed his life.

Written in 1996, when "Smokin' Joe" was 52 and still bitter at Muhammad Ali's name tauntings of him when they were professional heavyweight fighters in the 1970s, this book revealed a lot about Joe's life.

Most of you who will read this review must be, to some extent, familiar with the boxing history between Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali. In this book, Frazier goes into astonishing details about his recollections which made me feel as if he were here next to me talking to me himself.

The book also connects Joe's past to his present and gives you clarity on how he developed as a man. He is very inspirational in how he explains how he rose to the top from his poor upbringing, though poor only in terms of money, not pride, committment to his family, or belief in himself: areas about himself that were a wealth of possibilities as long as someone believed in him.

The book begins with his childhood in South Carolina and he gives you a feel about what he was like and how close he was to his father and the relationship he had with women, his friends, and experiences he had while living in a racially segregated South.

Piece by piece, step by step, "like a train", Joe literally takes us on the train ride of his life clearly explaining many fascinating details about his early fights. What impressed me was his attention to detail about his opponents.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "big_talka" on April 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I rated this book so well because it deserves every star. Frazier makes himself heard without using a bad attitude and keeping up his Mr Nice Guy cherade. I enjoyed the criticism of Muhammad Ali Frazier displayed. He told all how Ali could only bring the public on his side by racially abusing frazier and making him seem like a bad image to the african american public. Ali used fraziers words against him as frazier clearly says "I am the peoples champion" while Ali or Clay as frazier names him made his words sound like "I am the white peoples champion". Although Frazier is a perfect gentlemen he has a vicious bite to his story and isnt afraid of displaying his actual feelings. Although I am a loyal supporter of Muhammad Ali, I feel Frazier really is the Greatest and should be considered a role model to all boxing fans.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By reviewer on December 16, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Lions belong to a class of animals, which is famous for its biting prowess. My father once said that any thing that bites a lion to death is strong. I agree. Smokin' Joe is one such thing. A very strong one!
This 1964 Olympic Heavyweight Champion, as well as an ex-World Heavyweight Champion will kill a lion with one "bite", if it is all it will take to become champion. This his autobiography makes no exaggeration of this fact.
Frazier is one of the most respected heavyweights on Ali's mind. He handed The Greatest his first professional defeat, (in the Fight Of The Century). He is also, the only one to take him to the "door of death", (in the Thrilla In Manila). Although Ali refused to pass through that "door", he didn't forget what he saw. Joe is a ferocious fighter: an armoured car! George Foreman and Muhammad Ali were the only fighters capable of handing him convincing defeats. But each one testified that this Main-Battle-Tank of a man always rises as soon as he hits the canvas.
Ring animosity apart, Joe is one of the few fighters that Ali wanted for a friend. Foreman once feared him; and still respects him. This autobiography is down-to-earth.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6, 1999
Format: Hardcover
SMOKIN' JOE, the autobiography of heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier, has its share of interesting and amusing stories. Its tone is one of getting the job done, not unlike Frazier's boxing style - he would take several punches just to land one, because one Smokin' Joe left hook was all that was necessary to finish the job. SMOKIN' JOE definitely tells you few things you didn't know, but it left me with the feeling that Joe Frazier wasn't saying everything on his mind. Maybe a more assertive editor or co-author would have gotten the quiet fighter to open up a little more.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Susan on January 17, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Smokin' Joe give a good history of the game in and out of the ring. The politics in this sport is obvious, and Joe lets the reader in on the grind. From his humble beginnings to his determinatin for a brighter future to finally grasping the prize, his end is bridged by his son, Marvis climb to the title fight. Smokin' Joe deserves high props for eduring when most wouldn't, in and out of the ropes! God Bless the Champ.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John T. Noctor on May 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I've seen all of Joe Frazier's fights and watched them dozens of times, so when I finished reading his great autobiography in the Hobart library in Tasmania, I dreamed of meeting him one day. Joe Frazier's autobiography was fantastic and I loved reading about his hard childhood before his boxing days, and though he was poor, he had a wonderful family. Smokin' Joe had a great sense of humour and was obviously as funny as Gerry Lewis and Muhammad Ali. I love Joe Frazier's hilarious and absorbing literature, both in-and-out of the ring and belly laughed when reading the parts about bug-eyed nut-balls and whipping scamboogas and such.

Six months after reading this inspiring book, I cried when hearing of the planet's best heavyweights passing away. Philadelphia lost its greatest heavyweight champion and I'm saddened because now I'll never get to meet this compassionate and kind man who treated everyone as an equal. There should be a statue at the top of the Philadelphia steps of the great Joe Frazier, the real heavyweight champion of the world, not some actor.

I hope the Frazier family are all okay and I thank them for keeping Smokin' Joe's legacy strong for all of his fans.

Boxer Hobo: The Hobo Chronicles (Volume 2)
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