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Snow Bear (Soft-To-Touch Books) Paperback – October 1, 2007

4.7 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-In this bland story, a young polar bear leaves his cozy arctic den on the first day of spring to meet the world. His mother warns him to stay close, but exploring is so much fun that he soon becomes lost. A girl who is fishing feeds him and takes him home in her dogsled. Full-spread illustrations contain lots of white accentuated mostly with blues, greens, purples, and browns. Uncluttered backgrounds draw readers' eyes to the tactile animals created from fabrics that are soft to the touch. While the oversized spreads have some appeal, the little cub looks happy throughout the story, even when he is lost and hungry. This contradiction between text and illustrations may confuse young readers. Take a pass.
Kathleen Simonetta, Indian Trails Public Library District, Wheeling, IL
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

School Library Journal
(December 1, 2003; 0-439-54426-2)

PreS-In this bland story, a young polar bear leaves his cozy arctic den on the first day of spring to meet the world. His mother warns him to stay close, but exploring is so much fun that he soon becomes lost. A girl who is fishing feeds him and takes him home in her dogsled. Full-spread illustrations contain lots of white accentuated mostly with blues, greens, purples, and browns. Uncluttered backgrounds draw readers' eyes to the tactile animals created from fabrics that are soft to the touch. While the oversized spreads have some appeal, the little cub looks happy throughout the story, even when he is lost and hungry. This contradiction between text and illustrations may confuse young readers. Take a pass.-Kathleen Simonetta, Indian Trails Public Library District, Wheeling, IL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly
(November 24, 2003; 0-439-54426-2)

Although the primary draw of this over-size novelty book, a Soft to Touch title like the author/illustrator's Little Lamb, are the texture-enhanced watercolor illustrations, the visual and verbal storytelling unfold with enough fluidity and assurance to attract a preschool audience on their own merits. Emerging from his ice cave for the first time, Little Snow Bear embraces his new world with gusto: "[He] rolled around in the soft, powdery snow. It was so much fun, he did it again and again!" Mother Bear allows him to go exploring, but soon the cub is lost-a predicament that introduces Little Snow Bear to a friendly seal, a reindeer and an ice-fishing Inuit girl, who hitches her dogs to her sled and drives Little Snow Bear home to his mother. Harper creates full-bleed polar landscapes with an architecture of ice and snow, punctuated with gossamer lavenders and blues. The illustrations' flocking is pleasantly unpredictable; sometimes there are fairly big velvety surfaces for fingers to explore, and other times, just smidgens. In either case the special effects serve as embellishments to a sturdy offering-or the icebergs on the cake. Ages 3-5. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 5 years
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic; Mus Rep edition (October 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439925339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439925334
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 8 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,725,281 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 3 year-old nephew loved this book so much that I've bought copies from this series for each of my other nephews and nieces (I have 13 ages 5 and under!). These are beautiful books with sweet stories and wonderful pictures. The entire series is adorable! Definitely recommend.
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Format: Paperback
What does it take for a book to be successful with children? Piers Harper offers soft fuzzy animals (literally a flocked touch on various animal parts of various animals), friendly neighbors, an adorable little bear, a gentle, caring mother, and an obvious lesson about minding what your parents say. Thus we have "Snow Bear," what has long been a favorite of this PK3-8th librarian.

Snow Bear ventures out into the world only after his mother gives permission, ending their long winter inside their cave (and his birth). She admonishes him: Stay in my sight. As children are wont to do, he becomes intoxicated with play and strays away, first following one new sight after the other.

Even after he realizes he is lost, he finds a reindeer (I think it is one, well, the story says so), who takes him out of the forest. He meets a little girl who feeds him then takes him to his mother, overjoyed to be reunited with her young son.

So it ends happily.

However, one reviewer takes to task the disconnect between illustration and text. Words say Snow Bear is worried about being lost. In every illustration he is smiling and downright joyous. Disconnect. Troublesome. I had never thought of that.

Another thing which I then considered: He trusts everyone he meets and explicitly believes them that they have his interests at heart and will lead him home. We all know that is not so. Another disconnect?

Stop this foolishness. "Snow Bear" is a delightful "touch" book about a sweet, little bear who is loved by his gentle, caring mother. The tactile part is just lagniappe.

A note about white: White in art is rarely all white. The illustrations here demonstrate "whiteness" by including green, purple, blue, gray, and blue-green--all used to give shape, depth, and texture to the snow.

Sometimes a children's book is just a book to be enjoyed--
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Format: Hardcover
All of Harper's "touch me" books are fantastic! It's a delight to watch the enjoyment little ones get from these lovable books.
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By A Customer on December 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautiful book with "fuzzy" highlights. The paintings and colors are lovely on their own and the flocking adds a very pretty depth. The flocking is very well done indeed. It is really too bad that the story, what little story there is, lacks any poetry. Children will love the visual and tactile experience but buy something else also for the words.
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