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Soap Book Paperback – September 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Interweave (September 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883010144
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883010140
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #288,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sandy Maine is the founder of the Sunfeather Handcrafted Herbal Soap Company, which produces and markets more than 140,000 pounds of soap each year, and the author of Soothing Soaps.

More About the Author

I enjoy the comfort of the indoors after enjoyment of the wildness of the outdoors.
I love to swim, ski, ride horses, garden, hike, travel. I love to work up a good appetite and come home to a well prepared meal of garden or locally grown foods. I enjoy being a good wife and mother, and I enjoy a few good friendships. I like to munch on fair trade chocolate chips, when its time to get creative for writeing or artistic product development work at Sunfeather.I am a pacifist, an optimist and I believe that Love can conquer anything.

Customer Reviews

Great book and soap recipes!
candy
This book is great for getting new ideas to make soap-- Not too happy with using Crisco in the recipes though-I would leave that out of my soaps!
dragonflyhoneybee
Add 4 ounces of Rose oil, if you use 4 ounces of Rose essential oil and lets say you bought it wholesale.
P. S. Black

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

243 of 257 people found the following review helpful By P. S. Black on May 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Very pretty pictures. And some fun stuff of general interest on the intro to aromatherapy, history of soap, etc. Not sure some of that history is true, but neither does anyone else and that makes it rather romantic. ;)
There is only one recipe in the book, she just repeats it throughout the book changing the essential oils and fragrance oils for each recipe. Some she adds herbs to and some she doesn't.
Some of the herbs she uses turn brown and bleed, which is verified by her photos of her soaps.
The only way I can recommend the amounts of peppermint and lavender eo's that she's recommending is if you are buying VERY low quality EOs. Oddly enough, she has Frontier as one of the EO suppliers in one of her photos and I definately would not recommend that you use her recipe amounts for that brand.
Page 79: in this 8# batch of soap she says to add 1 oz of cinnamon essential oil. Please DON'T, you'll be sorry. Page 77, add 4 ounces to the same recipe. AAAHHH! Can we say, Red & Inflamed? Yeah, there are more... Page 57, 4 ounces of peppermint eo in an 8# batch of soap? Yikes, like taking a shower with an ice cube...
OK, ok, so you're buying your essential oils at one of these soap suppliers that buy low grade stuff and then dilute it with DPG? Okay, then pour that much, you'll probably be fine. Probably being an important word, because if they don't care about quality when they purchase,they might get the occassional good batch and then you'll be hurtin'.
Oh, and she says to add 1/2 cup dried peppermint leaf to the soap. Well, that is going to turn brown, bleed, and look yucky. There are much better ways to get an herb into a peppermint soap, say, put something in there that stays green, for instance.
Read more ›
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
I loved this book I have been agonizing for month's about making soap myself. I have spent a small fortune in specialty shops for these kinds of soaps. After spending hours on the internet and purchasing 3 seperate books I decided to use Sandy Maine's recipe for a first try. I think it's going to be a success!!! Once I gathered up enough courage to use LYE!!(it's not as scary as it sounds) The next hardest part was gathering all the equipment. Most items can bee found at the local Walmart, Pic n Save, even the Thrift store!! That's where I found my postal scale. I like that every basic recipe is the same just the additive's are the only change. I would also recomend "The Complete Soapmaker" by Norma Coony. Excellent picture's!!! Deals mostly with hand milling which semms to require much less essential oil. The oils are not eaten away by the lye solution. Susan Miller Cavitch's book "The Natural Soap Book" is a good reference and full of all kinds of "advanced" information. Not really a beginner book. I would love any input or advise from any one reading this review.
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46 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book may have been interesting when published in 1995, but it's woefully inadequate for today's home soapmakers. Not good for beginners due to the weak and incomplete instructions given. Vital safety and troubleshooting issues were totally ignored. One of the recipes is downright insane. "Mechanics' Body Repair Soap" calls for 2oz. of highly flammable kerosene, a degreasing agent and "scent that only a mechanic would love". No hazardous materials warning. She regards it as an ordinary fragrance oil. I wouldn't want to overturn a potful of scalding hot, caustic lye doing that one. The author owns a well-staffed soap manufacturing plant and is totally out of touch with what she calls "common, everyday folk". She offers only one boring recipe using 38 ounces of Crisco, 48 ounces of inexpensive carrier oils, 12oz. of lye and 32oz. of water, including unsoftened bilge from the tap. A small fortune in strong herbal essential oils is added to that. Result: Loads of waxy-looking soap blocks in harsh, dull colors. OK for outdoorsy men, but no aesthetic appeal for the average woman. Nothing on moisturizing additives, attractive coloration, light fragrances or anything else women tend to look for in toiletries. She relegates ever-popular Lavender scents to "elderly women" and writes in a generally condescending tone. The proofreaders had a few spelling problems as well. There are much better instruction books available. Among them, "The Hand Made Soap Book" by Melinda Coss. Published in September 1998. A beautiful book with lots of great ideas.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Sharon on December 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
I bought this book several years ago--and just got around to making soap for Christmas presents this year. This book was inspiring since it was short, simple, straight-forward . . . recipe was same--just different blends of essential oils.

DON'T USE 4 OUNCES OF ESSENTIAL OILS per batch--WAY TOO MUCH: 1) pool of excess essential oils sits on top of soap, 2) soap never hardens up quite right (according to Cavitch's book), 3) Essential oils are EXPENSIVE, 4) Scent is TOO STRONG, 5) Some essential oils (like cinnamon) used in called-for amounts actually too concentrated for skin (read other reviews!)

This book is a great starter for novices if you do the following: 1) cut the recipes by 1/4 to learn on smaller batches since the ingredients can be costly--in case your batch does not turn out during your learning stage; 2) invest in a good digital scale that allows you to "zero out" after adding each successive ingredient to the same container (accurate to 1/4 ounce and much faster--many initial mistakes attributed to measuring errors); 3) buy coconut oil at Walmart (under $3 for 31.5 oz); 4) obtain reasonably priced essential oils via internet at A Garden Eastward ([...] 5) Buy one of Susan Cavitch's soapmaking books next to learn from your mistakes and/or take your soapmaking to the next level--by then, you'll be motivated to absorb more complex information that seemed overwhelming/initimidating at first--which will make so much more sense once you've made a couple of batches.
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