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Social Crisis and Social Demoralization: The Dynamics of Status in American Race Relations Paperback – June 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Arissa Media Group, LLC (June 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0974288438
  • ISBN-13: 978-0974288437
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,315,324 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Ronald Kuykendall is an instructor of political science at Trident Technical College in South Carolina and has published articles in the Journal of Black Studies and Western Journal of Black Studies, and was a contributor to the multivolume Encyclopedia of the Great Black Migration. He lives in Greenville, South Carolina.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert A. Williams on January 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
Ronald Kuykendall's "Social Crisis and Social Demoralization" is a book that will interest those who have followed "conflict" perspectives on race; the author provides his version of a "conflict" perspective.

The author's discussion of "race relations within the U.S. between African Americans and European Americans" is an attempt to demonstrate that race relations are status relations from which can be deduced a series of behavioral consequences. The author believes that the primary determinant in situations of race relations is social status, so he begins his discussion there. He explains that "Social status determines where an individual begins his social existence; it also determines how and individual will live, where and in what condition he will live, how he will be reared, how he will be socialized, the extent of psychological suffering, and the magnitude of political repression".

Significantly, the first immediate consequence is social adversity. He explains that "prolonged social adversity has made African Americans highly susceptible to feelings of social crisis. Mentally debilitated by their predicament, African Americans are overwhelmed by emotion and stress, which severely retard their social functioning".

Next, the author examines social demoralization, which is a result of social crisis. "Social demoralization is a socio-psychological state that undermines confidence, discipline, willingness, and spirit", he says. "Finally, with shattered morale and shaken confidence, the African American is socially demoralized and given over to random, inconsistent, irrelevant, and irresponsible behavior", he asserts.
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Format: Paperback
Eleven years ago, when he wrote The Rage of a Privileged Class, Ellis uncovered a little-known social phenomenon, namely, the widespread anger and psychic pain being experienced by many of the best-educated African-Americans, despite their being well-respected and relatively prosperous, at least in comparison to the rest of the Black community. His seminal best seller exposed the diminished dreams of a seemingly successful set of overachievers who he found to be bitterly disappointed about the racial discrimination they had encountered, especially in terms of careers at the corporate level. Rather uniformly, they reported feeling betrayed by the country's conventional wisdom that "To get a good job, get a good education," as they found themselves still judged by skin color instead of the content of their character.

I refer to Cose's thought-provoking opus by way of introduction because it appears that it is precisely this same alienated group of individuals now being courted by Ronald Kuykendall in Social Crisis and Social Demoralization: The Dynamics of Status in American Race Relations. For Kuykendall, a Professor of Political Science at Greenville Technical College in South Carolina, argues that the United States' body politic, as currently constructed, is perfectly comfortable with Black people being ostensibly relegated to a permanent, second-class status.

The author blames deep-rooted bigotry for the malingering complacency about the plight of African-Americans in this country, contending that they emanate from a trio of unfortunate beliefs about Blacks' (1) biological inferiority, (2) cultural dysfunction, and (3) inability to figure out how to overcome the stigma of slavery.
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