Buy New
$21.27
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $6.68 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $10.24
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Social Justice and the City (Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation) Paperback – October 15, 2009


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.27
$21.27 $21.25
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Social Justice and the City (Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation) + Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution
Price for both: $34.95

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press; Revised edition (October 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820334030
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820334035
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #108,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A penetrating analysis of contemporary urbanism which may indeed be the signal for a change of direction, if not a revolution, in geographic thought. The time is certainly ripe for this. But it will appeal to and stimulate many other disciplines and professions. It will be controversial for it brings into question concepts and values that are fundamental to our way of life."--Times Higher Education Supplement


"One of the most influential books in human geography, Social Justice and the City is a generative work that has influenced decades of urban studies scholars. Harvey skillfully demonstrates the material forces that produce cities, urban geographies, and the problems that are often associated with them. In so doing, he opened up new territory for understanding some of the fundamental and enduring problems of the city."--Laura Pulido, author of Black, Brown, Yellow, and Left: Radical Activism in Los Angeles


"This book, in fact, provides the dimension that is almost entirely missing from the work of most critics, journalists, or historians who describe and discuss the contemporary city or the development of the modern movement in architecture."--Architects Journal


"A good book, by any standards, and it is to be hoped that even those many of the author's colleagues in geography, economics, and sociology, who may suspect that the dose of theoretical Marxism which we are offered here is too undiluted, may nonetheless ask themselves whether they can, either through some type of revisionism, or by starting elsewhere, offer a better or more comprehensive theory of the city."--Times Literary Supplement


"Establishes David Harvey as one of the most fertile and fruitful scholars working in the field of urban studies at the present time. It also makes quite clear that urban geography and non-Marxist urban economics can never be quite the same again."--Urban Studies


"Social Justice and the City has rightfully been an influential work, particularly among geographers. It is admirable not only in its systematic questioning of the traditional explanations of urban problems, but in insisting on a comprehensive view in explaining social phenomena. It is a refreshing work because of the paradigmatic change that is mapped in the course of the essays."--James L. Greer, Ethics


"A solid and much-needed achievement."--George W. Carey, Geographical Review


"The adage that we become more conservative as we grow older is but one of several comfortable notions that are profoundly shaken in this extraordinary book. . . . Social Justice and the City contains a wealth of convincing and unconvincing, disturbing and reinforcing, but usually provocative ideas."--Richard L. Morrill, Annals of the Association of American Geographers

About the Author

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His many books include A Brief History of Neoliberalism and Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development.

More About the Author

David Harvey teaches at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and is the author of many books including Social Justice and the City, The Condition of Postmodernity, The Limits to Capital, A Brief History of Neoliberalism and Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D.K. Thompson on March 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The updated edition of Harvey's classic work is an excellent analysis of space, urban economics, and concepts of justice that remains very relevant in today's urban context that tends to foster and reinforce social and economic divides within the built environment. For anyone who has wondered about the transformation of inner-city areas into ghettos or the recent reclaiming of certain of these areas by young professional "gentrifiers," the arguments in this book will help you develop your thoughts on these subjects. Unlike the more famous of Harvey's later writings, the perspectives here are not all drawn from critical Marxism. For those of you who are fans of Harvey's work, this book captures his transition from a more "liberal" stance on urban geography (evident in his pre-1970 work) to a critical Marxist approach.

The first section of the book contains somewhat of a struggle to conceptualize the urban system within a liberal framework, and throughout these chapters Harvey begins to develop a theory of location, the value of urban space, and the concept of urban justice that lead him towards a more critical stance. The themes touched upon in the first section come out strongly and in a more unified manner in the second section as Harvey draws on Marx's theory of value and rent to critically analyze the circulation of capital within the urban system, specifically the role of incomes and of rents in determining patterns of settlement and work for individuals of different classes. The inclusion of Harvey's essay "The Right to the City" is a bonus that complements recent work by Abdoumaliq Simone,Don Mitchell, Michael Keith, and other urban theorists (although of course this article is available elsewhere).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Donald A. Planey on September 28, 2012
Format: Paperback
"Social Justice and the City," originally published in 1973, is widely known both as a landmark study in the field of human geography and as David Harvey's Marxist coming-out-of-the-closet. I would say that it's a work of philosophy of science, but as the author declares, his intention is to challenge the entire Western tradition of scientific epistemology. In Harvey's thesis, strict positivism, the notion that science is the discovery and reaffirmation of fixed categories, has proven itself to be an inadequate approach to science across multiple fields of both the "hard" and social sciences, despite positivism's continued dominance within academia. Simultaneously, he argues that the history of post-WW2 attempts at urban social engineering and the new forms of political struggle which had risen out of the postwar urban world serve as evidence that science, especially social science, needs to continually critique its own methodology in order to continually generate meaningful and useful analyses. Harvey describes two related problems in the field of human geography (which extend to all of social science). The first is that his fellow geographers are too willing to accept the capitalist notion of value when studying urban life, and an equal problem of the tendency of Durkheimian social scientists to miss the concrete, yet fluctuating world around them due to their adherence to categorical ideals.

Like the European urban theorists Mumford and Lefebvre who preceded him, Harvey argues that science always rests on a worldview which is intrinsically linked to the values of the society it occupies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In general, I'm a fan of the writings of Harvey and this book is yet another reason why I value his literary and academic contributions. Harvey offers valuable insight into the construction of social justice within the build environment of our urban spaces. This book is good for students, sociologists, geographers and those who want to move past the neoliberal rhetoric.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jose longoria on October 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
having read more of harveys earlier work, I found this book interesting because it shows the change in his reasoning and understanding of social problems
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?