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Social Vulnerability to Disasters, Second Edition Hardcover – May 9, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1466516373 ISBN-10: 1466516372 Edition: 2nd

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Social Vulnerability to Disasters, Second Edition + The Human Side of Disaster, Second Edition + Everything in Its Path: Destruction of Community in the Buffalo Creek Flood
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 514 pages
  • Publisher: CRC Press; 2 edition (May 9, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466516372
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466516373
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Deborah S.K. Thomas, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver, where she also has a secondary appointment in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health in the Colorado School of Public Health. She specializes in hazards and health geography and has over twenty years of experience working with geographic information systems (GIS) in disaster management and health applications, both in the U.S. and internationally. Her research and teaching interests focus on issues of vulnerability/resilience as they relate to both natural and human-induced hazards and health outcomes.

Brenda D. Phillips, Ph.D., is the Associate Dean and Full Professor of Sociology at Ohio University-Chillicothe. She is the author of Mennonite Disaster Service and an editor on Social Vulnerability to Disasters (CRC Press). In 2013, she was inducted into the International Network of Women in Emergency Management’s Hall of Fame. In 2012, she received the Blanchard Award for Excellence in Emergency Management Education. Professor Phillips has conducted research on disaster recovery since 1982, beginning as a student of E.L. Quarantelli at The Ohio State University’s Disaster Research Center. Her published research can be found in a variety of journals including the International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, Disaster Prevention, Disasters, Humanity and Society, the Journal of Emergency Management, Natural Hazards Review, and Environmental Hazards. She has been funded multiple times by the National Science Foundation to study disasters and vulnerable populations. Dr. Phillips has been invited to teach, consult or lecture in New Zealand, Australia, Germany, India, Costa Rica, Mexico, Canada, and the People’s Republic of China. She is a graduate of Bluffton University (Ohio) and The Ohio State University.

William E. Lovekamp, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Eastern Illinois University. He specializes in gender and disaster vulnerability, college student disaster preparedness, and social change and empowerment. Most recently, he is utilizing geographic information systems for mapping disaster risks and cultural preservation in disaster risk areas. He is a member of the U.S. Gender and Disaster Resilience Alliance, the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association, the International Gender and Disaster Network, the International Sociological Association’s Research Committee on Disasters. He is co-organizer of the IRCD Researchers Meeting at the Annual Natural Hazards Workshop at the University of Colorado-Boulder and is an advisory council member and disaster response volunteer for the Coles & Clark Counties, Illinois Branch Office of the American Red Cross.

Alice Fothergill, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Vermont. Her areas of interest include family and childhood studies, disaster vulnerability, gender, inequality, service learning, and qualitative methods. Her book, Heads Above Water: Gender, Class, and Family in the Grand Forks Flood (SUNY Press 2004), examines women’s experiences in the 1997 flood in Grand Forks, North Dakota. She has conducted research on volunteerism in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in New York City. Professor Fothergill is a member of the Social Science Research Council’s (SSRC) Research Network on Persons Displaced by Hurricane Katrina and is currently finishing her book, Children of Katrina (forthcoming, University of Texas Press), with co-author Professor Lori Peek.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By W. B. Smith on October 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Easy reading text. I will probably keep this text after the semester. Nothing special to write about it. Great for EMGT professionals.
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3 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Smith on April 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I am currently enrolled in a masters program which is using this book for one of the required courses. I cannot believe this book was assigned for this course. I can barely make it through one paragraph without wanting to throw it down. The editors and authors have succeeded in seamlessly transitioning from the operational theory of social vulnerability in disaster management to the socialist (and ultimately progressive) political platform. Using every opportunity available, they are using this management theory to push every single tenant of socialism - I am disgusted! Karl Marx was quoted extensively throughout the second chapter's explanation of political theory.. a topic which is hardly relevant to social vulnerability theory (the connection was that social vulnerability exists in our society because we operate within a capitalistic socioeconomic system, and therefore disasters are a reflection of the evils of capitalism's effects on our society, as opposed to how society responds to the disaster). As an individual who holds a degree and certificates in political science and international relations, my eyes nearly popped out of my head at the strategic framing of political ideology and the relationship it apparently has with disaster management. I have no problem identifying the blatant agenda this book pushes, but what about the other students? They are clearly being targeted by the editors and authors as tools to push their agenda. How clever to target the field of emergency management.

I'm so mad I could spit nails. I have no idea if anyone will ever read this review, but I can't ignore the sly use of this book in this educational setting. I'm in the process of drafting a letter to my university voicing my concerns as well as disappointment.
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