Socialnomics and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Paperback in Very Good condition: clean, unmarked pages, strong binding. Light wear to cover. Appears gently read. All books cleaned prior to shipping. Shipped directly from Amazon! Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. Your satisfaction guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Socialnomics: How Social Media Transforms the Way We Live and Do Business Paperback – October 26, 2010


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 26, 2010
$5.15 $0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle Business Book Daily Deal
Today only, Joseph Michelli's "The Zappos Experience" is on sale for only $1.99. Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; Revised and Updated Edition edition (October 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470638842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470638842
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (211 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #591,653 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A 2010 Finalist for the Berry-AMA Book Prize for the Best Book in Marketing”

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Author

Thanks for making my book #1 in 8 different languages. Per your (my readers/fans) requests , I've updated and added ten new chapters to the best selling original. I hope you enjoy! --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Called a Digital Dale Carnegie, Erik Qualman is the author of Socialnomics: How social media transforms the way we live and do business and Digital Leader: The 5 Keys to Success & Influence. Socialnomics made Amazon's #1 Best Selling List for the US, Japan, UK, Canada, Portugal, Italy, China, Korea and Germany. His new book Digital Leader launched in 2012 has experienced similar success.

Socialnomics was a finalist for the "2010 Book of the Year" awarded by the American Marketing Association. Qualman produced "Social Media Revolution" the most watched social media video series in the world and it has been used by NASA to the National Guard. Fast Company Magazine listed him as a Top 100 Digital Influencer.

Qualman is a frequently requested International speaker and has been highlighted in numerous media outlets including: 60 Minutes, The New York Times, WSJ, Mashable, USA Today, ABC News, Financial Times, Forbes, Fortune, CBS News, and The Huffington Post. He has been fortunate to share the stage with Julie Andrews, Al Gore, Tony Hawk, Sarah Palin, Jose Socrates (Prime Minister of Portugal), Alan Mulally (Ford CEO), James Carville & Mary Matalin, Lee Scott (Chairman Walmart), and many others.

Qualman is an MBA Professor at the Hult International Business School. For the past 18 years Qualman has helped grow the digital capabilities of many companies including Cadillac, EarthLink, EF Education, Yahoo, Travelzoo and AT&T. He is the founder and owner of socialnomics.com which PC Magazine ranked as a Top 10 Social Media Blog. He sits on the Advisory Boards of Manumatix, ShopVisible and Bazaarvoice Inc. Qualman holds a BA from Michigan State University and an MBA from The University of Texas.

He was Academic All-Big Ten in basketball at Michigan State University and still finds time to follow his beloved Spartans while living in Boston with his wife and daughter. In 2011 Erik was honored as the Michigan State Alum of the Year and in 2012 he was selected as one of the Top 50 Professors in the world.

Qualman has recently advised/given keynotes with the following: Coach, IBM, Facebook, UGG Australia, Starbucks, M&M/Mars, Cartier, Raytheon, Montblanc, TEDx, Polo, UGG, Nokia, Google, and more. Qualman gave the commencement address to the 2011 graduating class of McCombs Business School (University of Texas).



Related Media


Customer Reviews

This is a fun read, very easy to understand, and full of examples to explain the points made and ideas presented.
Lottie Kendall
It's great to have that so you can go back and find something you wanted to go back and read (or if you need to find something to help you write your book review).
Brian Borawski
If you want to understand how social media can generate you more business, then Socialnomics by Erik Qualman is an absolute must read!
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

205 of 222 people found the following review helpful By David M. Freedman on January 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Qualman insightfully advises companies to patiently build relationships with customers through social media, rather than instantly getting a customer's name and e-mail address into its database. "Good businesses realize that it's not all about the instant win of getting someone into a database," he says. "Rather it is cultivating that relationship via social media. If it's done correctly, you will have a relationship that lasts a lifetime." Throughout the book he tries, but doesn't quite succeed, to show how to "correctly" cultivate such relationships.

Another insight: He says on page 111 that marketers will need to create content (news, entertainment, and how-to information, for example) for their websites, not just advertising messages.

Unfortunately, insights like those are few and far between.

Qualman's platitudinous premise is stated in the introduction, and again in the conclusion:

"It's all about the economy, stupid. No, it's all about a people-driven economy, stupid. If anything, I hope that you have learned this from reading this book."

(In the introduction, Qualman explained that the phrase "It's the economy, stupid" was coined in 1992 by James Carville, Bill Clinton's campaign manager. Qualman merely "adjusted" that phrase to create the book's alleged premise.)

After reading the book, I still don't have the slightest idea how the "people-driven economy" differs from "the economy." Or what the adjusted phrase means.

This book is full of superficial anecdotes and miniscule case studies, platitudes and generalizations, unsupported opinions, idle speculation, specious claims, inconsistent style, imprecise language, typos, and bad punctuation.
Read more ›
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Sheldon Chang on June 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First, let me make it clear that I'm not an old grumpy throwback still trying to score deals in the classifieds section of my newspaper. I have an Internet history that dates back to the 80's and I design and engineer websites and I've done plenty of work on sites that either are social media sites or take advantage of social media sites. I have a very long view of social media and how far its come and how it has disappointed.

In the first paragraph of the introduction, Qualman writes "Just like social media itself, this book is written in sporadically digestible sound bites." This is all you need to know about this book. If you want a brainstorm of half-proven assertions that you can mine for ideas for your next marketing campaign, you'll probably find this book valuable. If you're looking to establish understanding and a long term outlook on social media, keep looking because another way that this book is like most social media is that it will have a short shelf life.

Socialnomics promises to reveal how social media transforms the way we live and do business, but it doesn't reveal or inform so much as it presents a lot of loose anecdotes about the power of social media and how it appears to be affecting the world. While he occasionally makes a passing mention of the downside of social media, his tone is too often an infomercial-like positivity about the sheer awesomeness of social media. A particularly cringe-worthy example is how he closes his introduction by claiming that social media will reduce redundancy and recapture billions of hours that can be redistributed toward the betterment of society.

This is a bridge too far and if you're going to make paradigm changing predictions like this, you'd better devote some serious grey matter into backing it up.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By The Marketing Guy Who Drives Sales -r on January 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Qualman does a very good job telling the reader why social media and social media marketing are not flash-in-the-pan fads that will be gone within a few years. Savvy marketers and brand builders must understand the new media environment in which they are operating and embrace it as the future. It is how things will be for a long time to come. Qualman helps you understand the environment and offers some insights on how others have leveraged social media to their perceived advantage.

The problems I have with this book stem from my perception that the author offers what seem like well pondered conclusions but reveals no data, no research and very little support evidence or hard quantitation so I was left to wonder if these "facts" are based on hard data or on the author's own biases and cheery assumptions.

He seems to talk about the 2008 U.S. presidential election a little too much throughout the book which is a bit annoying for business professionals looking for application and then late in the book Qualman delves into human resource management as related to social media and it just seems to go a bit overboard. Advice like, "[hire young talent and] simply get out of the way because the young talent may be vastly more talented in certain areas" may be accurate but it is so vague and general that it is worthless advice. One assumes he means that because young talent is much more in tune with social media that they will be able to perform better at job functions that have ties to social media, but again, no specifics, no details and no supporting evidence for this claim. It is at these moments in the book that it seems the author is a bit too much of a kool-aid drinking cheerleader simply repeating, "this changes everything." We've heard all the hype already.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews