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Sociocultural Intelligence: A New Discipline in Intelligence Studies (Bloomsbury Intelligence Studies) Paperback – July 15, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Bloomsbury Intelligence Studies
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (July 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441155317
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441155313
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #950,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Kerry Patton has a passion for improving the security of our country, and for improving how we carry out a vital mission in the Global War on Terror. Patton has had his boots on the ground, squatted in the dust, ate goat with his hands, and imbibed the culture of our allies and enemies. He does a valuable service in opening the discussion of applying anthropology (the study of culture) to our greater National Security needs. This work should be just the first salvo in the battle to confirm the justness of Kerry's approach. We cannot allow misguided academics to take away a valuable tool in our efforts to do the right thing." —Kent Clizbe, Cross-cultural Humint Expert, Educator, and Commentator

"Kerry Patton provides an in-depth, much needed, and fully analyzed proposal for a newly instituted intelligence discipline known as SOCINT. After operating and living with local Afghans, his supporting evidence matches that which Major General Michael Flynn recently described in his works Fixing Intel: A Blueprint for Making Intelligence Relevant in Afghanistan. With billions of dollars expended and lives of America's finest continuously endangered, there is no better time to incorporate a "Sociocultural Intelligence" discipline in defeating asymmetrical threats. MUST READ!" —Thomas G. McInerney, Lt. Gen. USAF (Ret)

"Patton puts forward an interesting proposal that can improve multidimensional intelligence analysis by focusing on those "hidden" social and cultural aspects we currently ignore. It is clear we need a new type of intelligence officer and decision-maker that appreciate the value of these intangibles and then commit themselves on collecting, analyzing and acting upon them in our quest for understanding, and solving the world's problems."—Dalene Duvenage, CEO, 4Knowledge Analysis Solutions, South Africa.

Author Kerry Patton was interviewed by Jamie Colby on Fox News Live on 5 July discussing the just-released 2011 National Counterterrorism Strategy.

"Kerry Patton has a passion for improving the security of our country, and for improving how we carry out a vital mission in the Global War on Terror.  Patton has had his boots on the ground, squatted in the dust, ate goat with his hands, and imbibed the culture of our allies and enemies.  He does a valuable service in opening the discussion of applying anthropology (the study of culture) to our greater National Security needs.  This work should be just the first salvo in the battle to confirm the justness of Kerry's approach.  We cannot allow misguided academics to take away a valuable tool in our efforts to do the right thing." —Kent Clizbe, Cross-cultural Humint Expert, Educator, and Commentator

“Kerry Patton provides an in-depth, much needed, and fully analyzed proposal for a newly instituted intelligence discipline known as SOCINT. After operating and living with local Afghans, his supporting evidence matches that which Major General Michael Flynn recently described in his works Fixing Intel: A Blueprint for Making Intelligence Relevant in Afghanistan. With billions of dollars expended and lives of America’s finest continuously endangered, there is no better time to incorporate a “Sociocultural Intelligence” discipline in defeating asymmetrical threats. MUST READ!” —Thomas G. McInerney, Lt. Gen. USAF (Ret)

"Patton puts forward an interesting proposal that can improve multidimensional intelligence analysis by focusing on those "hidden" social and cultural aspects we currently ignore. It is clear we need a new type of intelligence officer and  decision-maker that appreciate the value of these intangibles and then commit themselves on collecting,  analyzing and acting upon them in our quest for understanding, and solving the world's problems."—Dalene Duvenage, CEO, 4Knowledge Analysis Solutions, South Africa.

From the Back Cover

"Kerry Patton provides an in-depth, much needed, and fully analyzed proposal for a newly instituted intelligence discipline known as SOCINT. After operating and living with local Afghans, his supporting evidence matches that which Major General Michael Flynn recently described in his works Fixing Intel: A Blueprint for Making Intelligence Relevant in Afghanistan. With billions of dollars expended and lives of America's finest continuously endangered, there is no better time to incorporate a "Sociocultural Intelligence" discipline in defeating asymmetrical threats. MUST READ!" --Thomas G. McInerney, Lt. Gen. USAF (Ret)

"Patton puts forward an interesting proposal that can improve multidimensional intelligence analysis by focusing on those "hidden" social and cultural aspects we currently ignore. It is clear we need a new type of intelligence officer and  decision-maker that appreciate the value of these intangibles and then commit themselves on collecting,  analyzing and acting upon them in our quest for understanding, and solving the world's problems."--Dalene Duvenage, CEO, 4Knowledge Analysis Solutions, South Africa

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Retired Reader on March 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book attempts to introduce a very important concept: namely the application of the so-called social sciences in the development of tactical and strategic intelligence. Unfortunately its author Kerry Patton demonstrates a remarkably poor understanding of his subject and indeed of the craft of intelligence.

Patton argues that what he terms "sociocultural" intelligence is a new discipline. It is not. Had he done his homework he would know that this application of social science to developing intelligence was used effectively in WWII. Probably the best known example of which was the government sponsored study of Japan by anthropologist Ruth Benedict, "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture." He completely ignores the definitive book on this subject, "Anthropological Intelligence" (David Price Duke 2008), which discusses the use and neglect anthropological studies by the U.S. during WWII.

Perhaps Patton's most glaring mistake is his assumption that analysis of the languages, cultural patterns and social structures of intelligence target is not done already. Marc Sageman in his book "Understanding Terror Networks" (2004 University of Pennsylvania) used precisely the social science disciplines to develop a very widely accepted description the Global Jihad, especially al Qaeda. Indeed the concept of `target knowledge within and outside of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC) is based on building information about the social behaviors, cultural bias, and social structures of intelligence targets. Remarkably Patton never once mentions the role of language in understand the culture of a people or of a country. This is incredible.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Will on August 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As someone involved in socio-cultural research in Afghanistan I was anxiously awaiting this book. Unfortunately it has turned out to be a major disappointment. The writing style is so poor that it distracts from the overall content of the book - which is also disappointing. Some of the sentences make little sense, or even mean the opposite of what the author is trying to say. For instance, in one case he writes "we must begin to incorporate more ethnocentrism into our operations and analysis" (p. 34). It would seem that the author doesn't grasp the meaning of the word ethnocentrism as the entire thrust of the book is that we need to break away from ethnocentrism and try to understand other's cultures. I would not recommend this book to anyone. Hopefully a good book on this vastly important subject will soon be written; this isn't it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Buonomo on July 7, 2012
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This book went all over the place. Terribly organized with little helpful, substantive material in terms of SOCINT collection and analytical processes or real-world case studies.
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Kerry Patton's Sociocultural Intelligence proposes formalizing and incorporating a new intelligence discipline or "int" into the U.S. Intelligence Community. I agree with his premise and assess that most of his suggestions are valid, but in saying this, neither he nor I are unique. The ideas that the U.S. has become too enamored with expensive technical intelligence and interprets the actions of indigenous people (in Afghanistan for example) through the prism of their own cultural bias- were proposed by many, in and out of the I.C., prior to the publication of this book in 2010. Some have compared Patton's book with MG Flynn's Fixing Intel, and while both agree that changes must be made in the intelligence effort against counterinsurgency, Flynn's proposal is much more succinct and direct.

While Patton's conclusions are valid, his book lacks readability or clear, concise organization. We can both agree that the intelligence collection effort should shift to the whole population, not just the insurgents themselves and their weapon of choice, the IED. Patton's passions and proposals are laudable; only his book isn't too original or clearly argued.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Paul Mazziotta on December 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Lessons learned in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have indicated that the lack of cultural knowledge is one of the most crucial points in modern military operations. Cultural intelligence gathering, as the collection of human, culture, social, religious and behavioral knowledge proves to be an invaluable asset during all phases of conjunct military and civilian operations, but still this expertise has not been exploited and implemented in operational terms.

Dr. Patton's book, " Sociocultural Intelligence: A New Discipline in Intelligence Studies" fills the void rendering a precise and clear insight on what SOCINT (Sociocultural Intelligence) is and how it may be applied to diverse contexts, either related to defense as to larger intelligence gathering needs.
The work of Dr. Patton within this particular combined discipline is one of great importance: it is capable of defining operationally, in clear words, what can be done to understand and improve cultural gaps and, therefore, improve macroscopically interpersonal relations and initialize the flow of communication that is at the core of human intelligence (HUMINT).

"Sociocultural Intelligence: A New Discipline in Intelligence Studies" is a precious tool in the hands of all that are concerned or in the need of understanding modern day intelligence collection methods and implement it in diverse real life scenarios.
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More About the Author

Kerry Patton is an internationally recognized security, terrorism, and intelligence professional. He has taught domestic and international organizations in counter-terrorism, intelligence, and physical security related issues. He has briefed some of the highest government officials ranging from ambassadors and members of Congress and Pentagon staff.

Kerry has served his country honorably throughout South America, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe, fulfilling human intelligence and physical security operations. He has conducted risk management programs on critical assets, carried out tactical surveys of more than five hundred international airfields and energy platforms, and supported in the protection of Afghan President Karzai. While operating in some of today's most classified US government programs, Kerry has interviewed (outside of interrogations) terrorists and former terrorists within multiple groups, which include Hezb Islami Gullbidine, Taliban, Maoist rebels, and the Palestinian Liberation Organization. He operated in and outside of Afghanistan from 2001 through late 2008. His knowledge of Afghanistan has been shared through numerous speaking venues from radio talk shows, academic conferences, and law enforcement seminars, to non-public government engagements.

Kerry serves as the vice president of training and public relations for the Emerald Society of the Federal Law Enforcement Agencies. He currently teaches counter-terrorism, intelligence, and protection management courses for Henley-Putnam University.

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