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Socrates Meets Jesus: History's Greatest Questioner Confronts the Claims of Christ Paperback – January 10, 2002


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Socrates Meets Jesus: History's Greatest Questioner Confronts the Claims of Christ + Between Heaven and Hell: A Dialog Somewhere Beyond Death with John F. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis & Aldous Huxley + The Best Things in Life
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 182 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Books (January 10, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830823387
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830823383
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #46,586 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter J. Kreeft (Ph.D., Fordham University) is professor of philosophy at Boston College where he has taught since 1965. A popular lecturer, he has also taught at many other colleges, seminaries and educational institutions in the eastern United States. Kreeft has written more than fifty books, including

and, with Ronald Tacelli,

More About the Author


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--- NEW! -- Charisms: Visions, Tongues, Healing, etc. (feat. Dave Nevins)

---"Beauty" -- The branch of philosophy dealing with aesthetics.
---"C. S. Lewis and Mere Christianity" -- C.S. Lewis' masterpiece
---"Christianity in Lord of the Rings" -- The cleverly disguised role of God
---"Culture War" -- A call to arms, mapping key enemies and battlefields
---"Existence of God" -- A magnificent overview of the arguments
---"Good, True, Beautiful" -- C.S. Lewis on three great transcendentals
---"Happiness" -- How do you get it? Christ's version vs. the world's
---"Heaven" -- The heart's deepest longing
---"Hollywood Screenwriting" -- Encouragement to film's creative storytellers
---"If Einstein Had Been a Surfer" -- Rediscovering intuitive thinking
---"Lord, Liar, or Lunatic" -- The famous argument for Christ's identity
---"Problem of Pain" -- C.S. Lewis's brilliant exposition on suffering and evil
---"Sex in Heaven" -- Imaging the fire of God's love
---"Sexual Reconnection" -- Healing the link between sex & love
---"Shocking Beauty" -- The live character of Christ
---
---

Lecture scheduling and more info:
http://www.peterkreeft.com



--

Customer Reviews

This book is really fun to read.
Amazon Customer
Ultimately, Kreeft corrupts the character of the noble Socrates in order to make his weak argument regarding "the truth of the resurrection" seem stronger.
Pope Brak
The first time I read Kreeft's Socratic style, a book written directly as dialogue, I was not all that enthusiastic about it.
Steven R. McEvoy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

83 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Corum Seth Smith on June 8, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, if I may get away with answering some critics. I was a philosophy and religious studies student at a secular liberal arts university where Christianity was not thought of fondly. I then went to a divinity school where I learned that not everything called "Christian" really is. Though I may not be an expert, I know what kind of things go on in the setting that Kreeft has offered, a divinity school.

If nothing else, Socrates criticizes modernist "Christians" who try and have it both ways (All the success of the spread of Christianity without any doctrine or personal piety). Now with regards to the critics, many of them use two words: "straw man" and "fundamentalism." The irony is this: anyone who does not want to critically consider the claims of Christianity calls even its basic, central beliefs (crucifixion, resurrection, Bible) "fundamentalism." Anyone who goes to Divinity School will (hopefully) learn that there have been Benedictines, Puritans, and Lutherans; however all these people had in common basic beliefs about who Jesus was and what he did. After a belief is deemed "fundamentalist," it is no longer studied. Fundamentalism becomes such an all-encompassing, and thus poorly defined staw man, that Christianity is considered easily dispatched.

However, it would serve such critics well to read the sociologist of religion Martin Marty's "Fundamentalisms Observed." In it, he dispels the popular notion that fundamentalism is the predominant mode of Christianity, and second, contends that many "conservative" Christians really aren't fundamentalists. In fact, this irony is aptly exposed in chap. 3 of Kreeft's book when Socrates concludes that the definition of fundamentalism employed currently is too broadly conceived.
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55 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
Several reviewers have commented on the simplistic nature of the discussion within the book. However, I think that fails to recognize the intent of the book. Kreeft is not attempting a thorough, painstaking, philosophical examination of Christianity. He is not a New Testament scholar, and would scarcely even suggest such a thing. His purpose is to use Socrates as a vehicle for approaching some of the core concepts of Christianity, specifically those most frequently addressed in popular circles. Even among the topics most purely "philosophical", he is able to address them in only an introductory way. He succeeds admirably in revealing some of the absurd notions regarding Jesus that find such frequent mention today. He employs logic in a very clear, vivid way, using it as the tool that it is to test and examine these notions. The book seems intended to introduce and encourage one to consider the claims of Christianity ACCORDING TO THE PRIMARY TEXTUAL SOURCE, the bible. NOT hearsay, weekly news magazines, and Discovery Channel documentries. If Christianity is true, then we better wake up to it, and face the issues Jesus raises as though our lives depended on it. And maybe they do. Logic and common sense demand such an examination.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Steven R. McEvoy TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is another in a series by Kreeft that has Socrates reappearing in a modern day setting to challenge people with what they believe or why the live the way they do. So, much like his other books The Best Things In Life and The Unaborted Socrates, the names of people and places in this book are a series of puns and jokes. In this book, Socrates wakes up from what he assumed was his suicide in the 'Broadener Library at Have It University', which is supposed to be a renowned hub of learning in 'Camp Rich, Massachusetts'. Sound familiar?

It appears that he has been registered at the Have It Divinity School. The characters he interacts with are varied and interesting. The first student he meets is Bertha Broadmind, then Thomas Keptic, Professor Flatland who teaches 'Science and Religion'. Then Socrates encounters Professor Shift who teaches 'Comparative Religions'. Next Socrates encounters the claims of Christ in Professor Fesser's 'Christology' seminar. This is the purpose of the book - to have Socrates encounter the claims of Christ. The rest of the book takes place around these seminar classes.

Kreeft has a very interesting book here, in that he tries to answer the question of what would happen if Socrates of Athens were to reappear today and interact with a modern university crowd. Socrates has not changed much from dying and reappearing somewhere and some time else. He is still the ultimate questioner and his questions will challenge what people believe and why they believe.

The first time I read Kreeft's Socratic style, a book written directly as dialogue, I was not all that enthusiastic about it. But now that I have read a few books in this style, I really enjoy it. It makes the reading of philosophy very quick and painless.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
Imagine! An author wants to use philosophy and logic to examine common underlying principles of modern culture. Instead of writing (another!) college-text available to and of interest to only college students and their professors, he finds a premise and style that will apeal to the scholars and the uninitiated alike. Kreeft brings Socrates to life on the modern-day campus of Harvard. Through Socrates, Kreeft questions and examines and identifies many of the often unnamed and unspoken assumptions of modern US culture.
Kreeft's writing is clean and direct.
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