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Soldier, Statesman, Peacemaker: Leadership Lessons from George C. Marshall Hardcover – April 22, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: AMACOM; First Edition edition (April 22, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814408575
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814408575
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,125,502 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Cecil Johnson, syndicated columnist: ""Uldrich has done a splendid job packaging leadership advice with history and producing a very readable volume that should appeal to history buffs, business types and general readers.""

Quality Management Journal: ""...an extraordinary book."""



“…an extraordinary book.”

-Quality Management Journal

Book Description

Foreword by Fred Smith, President and CEO, Federal Express

No list of the greatest people of the 20th century is complete without General George C. Marshall. Winston Churchill called him the ""organizer of victory"" and ""the last great American."" President Harry Truman referred to him as the ""great one of the age."" Tom Brokaw called him the ""godfather"" of ""the greatest generation."" Even so, many people know Marshall's name without being able to recall his many astonishing accomplishments. Among them:

* He personally trained future generals Eisenhower, Bradley, Ridgeway, Patton, and others.

* As Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army before and during World War II, he oversaw its expansion from a small, homeland defense force -- smaller than Bulgaria's -- into the mightiest army ever assembled.

* As Secretary of State, he introduced the ""Marshall Plan,"" which literally rescued Europe after the war.

* He was the first professional soldier ever to win the Nobel Peace Prize and was twice named Time's Man of the Year.

Marshall's extraordinary career reflects unparalleled leadership traits and consummate skills, among them vision, candor, a commitment to action, the ability to listen and learn, and not least, selflessness. In an extraordinary chronicle and analysis of legendary leadership, Jack Uldrich brings the life and achievements of General Marshall front and center -- where they have always belonged.


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Customer Reviews

If we seem to be living in a time of leadership failure everywhere we turn, this book is a ray of hope.
Dave Hutcheson
Well-researched, this book provides numerous examples of the character of General Marshall of which I was previously unaware.
J A Chambers
I strongly urge managers, business executives, coaches--anyone in a leadership position--to read this book.
Brian P. Mcenaney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Morgan Witthoft on May 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There isn't any history in this book, and don't buy it if you are hoping to learn much about George C. Marshall. The book's script goes something like this:
Honesty.
Honesty is good.
George C. Marshall was honest. Here is an anecdote and a quotation to illustrate it.
We found a CEO who was honest. Here is an anecdote to illustrate it. This CEO made a lot of money.

Willingness to speak out.
Willingness to speak out is good.
George C. Marshall was willing to speak out. Here is an anecdote and a quotation to illustrate it.
We found a CEO who was willing to speak out. Here is an anecdote to illustrate it. This CEO made a lot of money.

( Repeat for seven more positive character traits)

George C. Marshall really was a great man, and I want to learn more about him. As another reviewer wrote, <<Marshall seems to embody all the great character qualities that I associate with ... the "greatest generation" ...selflessness, a sense of duty, integrity, candor, preparation, a love for learning and teaching others, fairness, vision and caring for others>>
Unfortunately this book does not establish these facts convincingly, which is what a biographer should do. It simply asserts them. Not only is the book short on facts, but the constant jump from discussing Marshall to comparing him to the CEO-of-the-week is somewhere between belittling and insulting to Marshall. And the final measure of the quality and virtue of these CEOs always comes down to money, which was not the point of Marshall's life in the first place. The greatness of Marshall does not make the book great.

As for the CEOs, I'm glad the writer could find one honest one and one who was willing to speak out (and so forth).
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Catherine Glynn on April 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
After reading Jack Uldrich's last leadership book about Lewis and Clark: Into the Unknown, I was very interested in his follow-up book about George Marshall.

I didn't know much about Marshall before reading this book but after reading it, I fully agree with Uldrich's assessment that George Marshall is one of the greatest (and previously unsung) leaders of the 20th century. More importantly -- and what the author does so well -- is demonstrate how Marshall's life is still relevant today. His lessons are spot on.

We need more leaders like George Marshall; leaders who are full of integrity, leaders who will candidly tell the public difficult truths, and leaders who will in turn train other leaders.

George Marshall did all of these things and more; he helped win the Second World War, instituted the Marshall Plan, and won the Nobel Peace Prize. For all of these things, Marshall deserves to not only be remembered but emulated -- and that's why this book is a must read for anyone hoping to become a better leader.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Shaw on April 25, 2005
Format: Hardcover
When men like Fred Smith, CEO of FEdEX; former U.S. Senator Warren Rudman; Bob Nardelli (CEO of The Home Depot) and Warren Bennis, all endorse a book it says something about that book.

In this case, the book is Soldier, Statesman, and Peacemaker: The Leadership Lesson of George C. Marshall and it succinctly capture the greatness of George Marshall. It also ably demonstrates how much, as Colin Powell said, " we still have to learn from the man."

I recommend this book for everyone--but I think it would make an especially good gift to young people just entering the world of business, finance, politics or the non-profit world. First, they

don't know much about George Marshall--and they should--and secondly, and more importantly, it demonstrates how people can still maintain their integrity and achieve great things."
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Michael D. Trimble VINE VOICE on August 24, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Like most of the other reviewers, I hold General Marshall in high regard, and as a result, I wanted this to be a defining book. It was not. It was however, a short little interesting look about Marshall.

I also realize my opinion contradicts what others here have written, but what I read was a somewhat disjointed biography (meaning it was not chronological) themed around General Marshall's leadership style. Generally speaking it is difficult to actually teach leadership or impart lessons learned, from a third person perspective, even when it is based on very thorough research. This book has research and some hearsay. What carries weight, is leadership taught in the 1st person. A good example of this--although in a very different setting--is John Wooden's book, Wooden on Leadership.

While this book is insightful, it is not nearly as inspirational as I would have hoped, or as it could have been. Assuming that in large measure the readership of this book are people having a personal relationship with the military or an affinity for its history, I believe the author missed an important opportunity to tie Marshall's leadership into the development of current leadership doctrine as defined in Army Field Manuals (FM 22-100, being primary). If anything, Marshall epitomized the current Army "Be, Know, Do" philosophy of leadership.

I would have preferred the author spend a little time explaining the difference between the "authority" Marshall gave his subordinates and the authority he and his subordinates earned from the men in their command. Over the years I have seen many people mistake the two. In the first instance Marshall, or any leader, authorizes a subordinate to make certain decisions without having to check back for permission.
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