Soledad and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.26
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $1.69 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Soledad: A Novel Paperback – November 12, 2002


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.26
$8.74 $4.24


Frequently Bought Together

Soledad: A Novel + Bodega Dreams: A Novel
Price for both: $28.02

Buy the selected items together
  • Bodega Dreams: A Novel $12.76

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (November 12, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743212029
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743212021
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #150,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

To write the definitive novel of a New York neighborhood can be to strike literary gold just ask Jonathan Lethem. Washington Heights native and Dominican activist Cruz stakes a clumsy claim to the area with this overwrought first effort. Soledad, a talented young artist on scholarship at Cooper Union, has finally escaped 164th Street for a downtown apartment. When she is called back home for the summer to care for her widowed mother, Olivia, who has fallen into a psychosomatic coma, she is forced to confront the family secrets behind her father's death and her strained relationship with Olivia. Much of the novel is told from the point of view of Soledad's female relatives: her aunt Gorda, a "bruja" (witch) who treats her sister's ailments with home remedies and ceremonies; her cousin, Flaca, a fiery adolescent whose rivalry with Soledad is the main subplot; and Olivia herself, in italicized dream narration and flashbacks. These characters are more interesting than Soledad, a standard-issue "caught between two worlds" heroine, but they are hardly three-dimensional. While Cruz sometimes captures fresh details of behavior and the rhythms of Dominican neighborhood life, she rarely lets them work alone, opting to tell rather than show her characters' psychology in passages that read like particularly banal therapy sessions. The narrative is peppered with cliches: "[W]hen a woman says no, if [men] see a glimpse of flirting or lips that are smiling, no echoes yes, yes if you try hard enough you will get me." Gorda's homespun mysticism is fascinating at first, but by the end it becomes heavy-handed as Cruz strives for a lyrical catharsis she hasn't earned. Readers enticed by a lengthy blurb from Junot Diaz will be disappointed by a melodramatic plot and stale prose. Agent, Ellen Levine.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This first novel from Cruz a native of Washington Heights in Manhattan adeptly transcends all the tired and hackneyed classifications of what is now commonly known as the "immigrant experience." Sidestepping the approach of using the novel as a guide for taking readers on a sightseeing tour of how the "other half" lives, Cruz instead chooses to probe the complex inner lives of a first- and second -generation Dominican family living in Washington Heights. The story begins when Soledad, an aspiring young artist, reluctantly returns home from her life in the East Village when her mother, Olivia, falls mentally ill. In the ensuing events, we meet Gorda, Soledad's caring yet superstitious aunt; Flaca, Gorda's rebellious teenage daughter; and Victor, Gorda and Olivia's philandering brother who falls in love in spite of himself. These are only a few of the memorable characters compassionately evoked in a story of people coming to terms with the suffering and disappointment of life. Unfortunately, there are moments when the story falters, as Cruz's decision to narrate using a myriad character voices is not always successful or believable. Nonetheless, she remains an astute witness to the hopes, dreams, fears, and frustrations of all humans. While by no means great, this is a promising debut from an author to keep an eye on. For most fiction collections. "Library Journal"
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Angie captures the universal struggles of Latina women and serves as an inspiration to us all.
Stefanie Cruz
Back in the old neighborhood she finds love where least expected, and at the end she realizes that everything she was looking for was always right in front of her.
"moon_angel15"
Its the perfect Kindle download to read and chuckle about while doing your mass transit commute.
lost9022

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Paul and Sally on May 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Loved this book! Loved the passion and the loyalty in which the family and neighbors have for each other. Also,the beautiful struggle to live and to love, fight and to dream. Soledad's journey is a great read. I laughed and cried, got a little wiser from the advice of the
viejo's(the old ones). This book would not have been the same without the spanglish. I will miss these people, they were my crazy familia for a few enjoyable hours. Thank you Angie Cruz...can't wait to read your next novel. I highly recommend this book to latina's everywhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Alan Cambeira on September 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
I thoroughly disagree with those reviewers of Angie Cruz's debut novel who perhaps smugly dismiss her work as being "a total mess," or "not enough story." One reviewer boldly proclaimed that Cruz "is no Gabriel Garcia Marquez." Well, really now!! Even to suggest that an initiate in the daunting art of this lofty genre must somehow (miraculously) immediately measure up to the accomplished mastery of a seasoned novelist of the rank and distinction of the Nobel Prize-winning Colombian writer Garcia Marquez or perhaps of the caliber of Chilean Isabel Allende is unreasonable at best. After all, these two writers par excellence eventually mastered their respective literary craft only after long years of painstakingly honing a (self-satisfying) writing style and ultimate artistry. Even skilled writers don't exactly tumble out of the womb being able to compose beautiful prose or poetry.
So, Angie Cruz joins the growing cadre of young, gifted writers such as Nelly Rosario and Loida Maritza Perez and others who, in time, will indeed garner the accolades and wider readership that Danticat, Alvarez, Conde, Junot Diaz, Esmeralda Santiago, and yes, Allende currently enjoy. Just give her time. Angie Cruz unquestionably knows the heart and soul of Washington Heights in upper Manhattan, home to thousands of dominicanos. She feels vividly the pulse and pace of these streets and the people there. Soledad's traumatic journey (an escape, actually) to downtown is memorable and quite believable. This is a provocative story, told with imaginative grace and power. All the characters are beautifully realized. Any suggestion of "a disorganized plot" is artistically and cleverly interwoven into the realistic, yet disorganized lives of the people who struggle to survive the harshness and ugliness of those mean streets. Y es facil, Ms Cruz?
Highly Recommended Reading!
Alan Cambeira
Author of AZUCAR! The Story of Sugar (a novel)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "moon_angel15" on May 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
At first I was attracted to this book for it's cover, but then i read it's tittle "Soledad" which means loneliness, and i thought maybe this book will keep me conected to my roots, and it did.
The story about a girl that wants a different future than everybody else, she wants to separate herself from what she has known all her life, to explore new paths that may take her far away.
Once she takes a new path she is forced to come back to take care of her mom who has checked out of the world. Soledad finds herself back in a place she longed to leave, she finds people she wanted to forget, but they all have something different to show her. Back in the old neighborhood she finds love where least expected, and at the end she realizes that everything she was looking for was always right in front of her.
I recomend this book to people who want to learn about a part of Latin cultures in the US.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "khalidah" on July 10, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have just finished reading this book. This book offers some insight. I also felt for the characters in the novel. However, it can be confusing if you have different people narrating. But I caught on. Again. It is a good read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Michael Thomas (Freelance Writer, NYC, August 2001 on August 13, 2001
Format: Hardcover
New Novel Reviewed: Soledad, by Angie Cruz
In her first novel Soledad, Angie Cruz shows that she can write good prose. Her style is evocative, simple, and clear, presenting an interesting world of spirit and intrigue packed with rich descriptions of upper New York City life. Although the title features the protagonist's name, the most brilliant and successful aspect of the novel is Cruz's creation of the teenage character Flaca. Effectively conveying the terror and beauty of adolescence, she is interesting, believable, and her scenes are full of internal and external conflict. Soledad captures a glimpse of the adolescent spirit similar to JD Salinger's classic The Catcher in the Rye, but within a Latino environment. Like Holden Caulfield, Soledad, a New York youth (but already 20 years old), suffers inner turmoil by much of what she sees. At the opening of the novel, Soledad returns to the home that she had once desperately fled. Her troubled past comes alive in the Washington Heights ghetto of New York City, where, in facing her family and friends, she confronts old and new parts of herself, eventually to the point of reexamining former assumptions. As she approaches her old block, she endures an attack within her own neighborhood, but not by any real physical forces of aggression; she is attacked by the memory of all things connected to home: "As soon as I arrive at 164th Street I'm attacked. I trip on the uneven sidewalk. The air-conditioners spit at me. The smell of onion and cilantro sting my eyes. I start to sneeze, the humidity is thick...Hydrants erupt...I know I should turn back while I still can...There are more cops on the street than fire hydrants. Merengue blares...sneakers hang from lamp posts...my time in Washington Heights is like a prison sentence.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?