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Solo: On Her Own Adventure (Seal Women's Travel) Paperback – May 10, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: Seal Women's Travel
  • Paperback: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Seal Press; 2nd edition (May 10, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580051375
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580051378
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.7 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,366,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Editor Rogers (Another Wilderness: New Outdoor Writing by Women, Seal Pr., 1994) offers 23 tales by world travelers describing a woman's experience traveling alone in the outdoors. As solo journeys, most of the interaction is internal, and each tale describes the emotional as well as the physical journeys undertaken. Decisions are made, fears dealt with, and negative reactions by others overcome. The experiences are quite varied, including traveling in New Zealand, rock climbing, winter camping, hunting antelope, and body-boarding with dolphins. How refreshing to find a book about the outdoors that addresses issues peculiar to women, such as the guilt of leaving the family and the fear of meeting a male or males while alone in the wilderness. The book will appeal to armchair travelers and women seeking inspiration and adventure. Recommended for public libraries where travel essays and outdoor literature are popular and for academic libraries with extensive women's studies' collections.?Alison Hopkins, Queens Borough P.L., N.Y.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

A very impressive collection of travel pieces by women who took to the byways--road, river, and trail--with only themselves as company. Rogers (editor, Another Wilderness: New Outdoor Writing by Women, not reviewed, etc.) has gathered here almost two dozen adventures that sparkle with insight into what it means to solo in the great outdoors. Sometimes the journeys are made in hopes of finding an answer, or at least a moment of clarity, regarding one of life's travails. Sometimes they're an act of fleeing--from lovers or family or personal demons. E.A. Miller draws a bead on the pretenses that had shaped her camping background: Was she really so adept in the wild, and if she was, then why did she keep asking herself what the men in her family would have done under a specific circumstance? ``Without an audience . . . I was at a loss, unable to frame my own experiences,'' she writes, until she decides to just enjoy herself. Then there is Bridget Quinn's wonderful attitudinizing, be it on ski slope or city street, and Susan Ewing chasing antelope in Montana while at the same time being pursued by ``the sordid siblings, Go-For-It and Fear,'' a couple of Furies who attend most solo exploits. Ann Baker goes on a pilgrim's progress through the former Himalayan kingdom of Ladakh, hoping to touch ``the chain of wisdom'' and spirituality crafted over the last couple of thousand years by the Buddhists of the region. There's not a whole lot of humor here to leaven these often trying episodes, but each piece is a revelation, affording a palpable, honest foray into the writer's personality, into how she contends with inner and outer bogeys, how her thought processes and survival instincts unfold. Crackingly good writing throughout, a heady stew rich with savory chunks of information for those, women or men, wishing to go it alone. -- Copyright ©1996, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Candace Dempsey is an award-winning Italian-American journalist, travel writer and author of MURDER IN ITALY, the true story of Amanda Knox, the American college student wrongly convicted of killing her British roommate. Best True Crime Book Editor's and Reader's Choice awards, Library Journal Bestseller, Top Ten Amazon True Crime.

Drawing upon candid interviews with the key players, case files, police reports, court documents, eyewitness accounts, crime scene videos, prison diaries, and DNA evidence, Candace's well-received Amanda Knox book reveals the real story behind the media frenzy surrounding this sensational international murder case.

Based in Seattle, Candace has written for The New York Times, Slate, MSN, the Chicago Tribune, the Boston Phoenix, Art & Antiques, and many other outlets. Her staff positions include: magazine editor, newspaper editor, staff writer, and a producer, editor and writer for MSN. Her travel tales have been published in numerous Travelers' Tales and Seal Press anthologies. She holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of Oregon, where she was a Graduate Teaching Fellow. She teaches online at writers.com.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed reading "Solo" and have been recommending it (and lending it) to friends. I loved these stories and didn't want to put the book down. Not only does each author describe their surroundings and actions (bicycling in New Zealand, kayaking in Alaska, trekking in Nepal) but they describe their emotions and where they are in their lives. Many of these women are making serious decisions about their lives, trying to break away from restrictive societal norms, develop a deeper relationship with themselves, choose between various life paths, and make decisions that are right for them (no matter how unconventional). I have been wanting to go on my own solo adventure, and this book has further encouraged me to go for it. I disagree with the previous reviewer's comment that "few tales show an appreciation of the outdoors for its own sake." Besides, is there only one way to appreciate nature and enjoy the outdoors?
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
Anyone who has ever fought to be understood about the extreme peace that is discovered in solo adventures will enjoy these short stories. Anyone who has ever pressed to have their own equipment and not rely upon the men in their life for their outdoor leadership needs will enjoy this collection of inspiring stories. After reading a few of these stories I was so moved to partake in a solo journey of my own. The night before I participated in a 32mile speed hike, I was seen thumbing through my favorite stories under a rainy sky in my tent. It was wonderful to see women experiencing these adventures of great self-importance. I encourage any woman looking for inspriration and female guidance to seek solace here!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Linda Ballou VINE VOICE on March 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Never hike alone. How many times have I been admonished not to hike solo? This advice has come from people I respect and I would like to comply, but I can't. The joy and ultimate purpose of the walks I take is to let my mind wander and to take time to allow the tape to run clean and make room for new impressions. This meditative state is hard to achieve when there is another consciousness crowding in on your thoughts. So, even though my father warned me against walking alone on the misty shores of Southeast Alaska when I was a teen, I still wandered away from civilization to absorb the cool breath of the forest. This is why I love these stories by other women who for some reason can't deny their need to experience life on their own terms and to test their own limits. That is what going solo means. You have no one to blame for mishaps and only your own inner river to listen to for advice. It is the path to self-growth and understanding taken by one woman who must ski in Yellowstone in the dead of winter alone, and another who becomes the first woman to sail from San Francisco to Hawaii in the Pacific Cup(a blue water crossing I've dreamed of making myself) solo. There are many more adventures in this anthology that call for a much higher degree of personal fortitude and courage than I have ever mustered on any of my experiences in the wild. This is one of several collections edited by Susan Fox Rogers that stands out on travel narratives shelves as quality examples of women who are not only stretching their limits, but teaching us all how to be brave and true to ourselves.
[...]
Lost Angel Walkabout-One Traveler's Tales-Soon to be released
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. S. Davis on August 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
I bought this book while traveling solo in Colorado. It took me a while to get through due to my busy schedule -- but, WOW, what a great read!! I laughed, shed a few tears, smiled and got angry. Highly recommended to any woman who aspires to travel solo or anyone trying to better understand a woman who travels solo!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By beccab on January 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
i loved each story from this book! I am a solo female traveler myself and every story inspired me!! I actually read a few of the stories aloud to my friends as we sunned on the beach and they enjoyed the stories as well!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Story Circle Book Reviews on November 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a woman who has found both bliss and grief in solitary desert adventures, I was immediately drawn to this essay collection. Here, as I had hoped, are women who understand that experience and know its value. What Susan Fox Rogers has also given us is a broad range of such women, revealing the many reasons one might choose such exposure to risk, and the varied responses to it.

For some women, such as Susan Marsh, this was a brief and impulsive choice. She simply spent a long evening finding her way alone through the Mojave back to her group and her campsite. Yet it was enough for her to find a revelation of consciousness, "a spontaneous mix of inner peace and sensory alacrity" that she hadn't known before.

E.A. Miller's family stories and expectations both motivated and inhibited her. She carefully planned her first solo weekend in the Adirondacks to be a trip without any history, personal or otherwise. With her dog along (which to my mind is not quite a solo), there was no drama, no danger, and she was never afraid. Nonetheless, she was without human company, and at a loss when trying to have her own experience, one unfiltered by the perceptions of others. It took half the trip to stop reviewing it, to simply be present.

For me, walking in solitude through the ancient and bare landscapes of the Southwest, carrying all that I need on my back, has always been a spiritual and creative quest. At first, it was a conquering of fear. Later, it became a renewal. Retreats into solitude left me with more to give to others. For each woman in this grouping, there is a motivation that is uniquely her own, and yet something that we can all recognize.

Lucy Jane Bledsoe, confident after many solo trips, describes the real danger of being a woman alone.
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