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Some of Me Hardcover – June 2, 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 179 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (June 2, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679452524
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679452522
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 0.8 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #520,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Some of Me is full of magic realism, moral elegance, and monstres sacrés. Though Isabella Rossellini deliberately chooses to reveal only bits of herself in her anecdotal new memoir, what amazing aspects they are. The photos tell part of the story: alongside Vogue covers and sumptuous magazine spreads, there are odder images--Ingrid Bergman in a balaclava; Rossellini sprawled on a chair with her potbellied pig and dog sprawled on her, all three looking equally pensive.

But, oh, the prose! More provocative than ten tell-alls stacked together, Some of Me is an analyst's treasure trove and a reader's delight. There is something for everyone. Those interested in Rossellini's rise and fall as the Lancôme model will find indignant if good-humored fodder--she warns some to skip ahead "if you can't stand boring." But even those of us who wish we didn't know all those supermodels' names will find this section intriguing. Rossellini also provides some intriguing insights into her often bizarre film roles. There are, though, more bravura sections in this memoir. Who knew that Rossellini still communes with her dead parents? The author prints some of their debates verbatim, though she has already warned: "It's a habit of mine to embellish and color events until I lose sight of what really happened." Rossellini also takes on more upsetting memories such as the painful treatment she underwent for scoliosis and the thoughtless questions people ask about her adopted child. At one point, she remarks, "True elegance is for me the manifestation of an independent mind." Some of Me is a truly elegant manifestation.

From Library Journal

Rossellini is a personality in every sense. As the daughter of Ingrid Bergman and Roberto Rossellini, she was famous by default even before she forged her own career by design, most noticeably as Lancome's cover girl. In this lisless work, she ruminates on such diverse, rather banal subjects as aging, pets, her mother's hand-me-down fur coat, and the sex lives of garden insects. Her recollections of her family and of influential people around her are occasionally moving, and the sensitivity with which she created her roles in the films Blue Velvet and Wild at Heart makes for an interesting aside. Rossellini's insight into the fashion industry is trenchant: advertising campaigns are shown to be the ultimate postmodern compliment to legendary women. Belied throughout is the author's truly cosmopolitan upbringing in Paris, Rome, and New York. More of a musing than a memoir, this slim volume is candid and intimate but not terribly profound. Of interest to those fascinated by the cult of personality.
-?Jayne Plymale, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Omnibus on August 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I don't usually run up and get a book autographed by the author. But person at the luncheon was mesmerizing. I sat there and thought about her mother Ingrid Bergman, her trials and tribulations, her remarkable beauty, her astonishing talent, and her warmth and genuineness. It was a wonderful and heartwarming 2 hours. I think everyone felt they had met a friend. The book? It covers the waterfront, written in crisp, clear, engaging style. Honest, memorable, including her unforgettable encounters with Anna Magnani, Katharine Hepburn, Martin Scorsese (ex-husband), Gary Oldman. Film, modeling, Television, businesswoman, human being. "Is being remembered a kind of antidote to death? Is fame a sor of eternity? A remedy to the sadness of the end? Does having a famous mother, whoisstill seen every day on TV smiling, crying, walking, talkin, maker her death different, less definitive than other deaths?" This book will last!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Miguel on November 25, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Going through the pages of this book, one gets to know several of the aspects of Isabella Rossellini's life in a candid way, yet she is only revealing what she intends to and not a single fact more... thus, she shares and keeps and does it in a wonderful way.
After reading it feels as if one has had a long, warm, affectionate conversation with her, feeling that, perhaps even if for the duration of the reading, she is a dear, most valued friend.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Melissa Hardie on June 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Who could resist a book that connects lounging around in bed all day with "spiritual and intellectual wisdom"? Isabella Rossellini's Some of Me is a perfectly wonderful memoir of, well, some of her memories, experiences, interests, and lies. Rossellini assures the reader at the beginning of the book that she lies, and it's a disarming admission which sits interestingly with the candid and transparent prose style she has mastered. Rossellini's memoir details her relationship with her parents, Scorcese, Lynch, and her children, as well as her private passions and interests. For all her discretion, the narrative feels candid, and humorously ironic in a manner that is disarmingly personal because it feels so intimately addressed to the reader.
Rossellini tells of her conversations with "ghosts," a way of tying herself to her past that tweaks the conceit of the lie to provide a quite poignant meditation on loss when it is gracefully and passionately accepted. Her wrangle with Lancome over their decision that she was too old to represent them deals with loss in a more vigorously defiant way, and yet with a certain savoir-faire: Rossellini warns us that this section will be boring, her way of distancing herself from her own disappointment, perhaps, but also something of a lie.
But what's so intriguing about this book is the way in which Rossellini relies on memory's imprecision to move from topic to topic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Isabella Rossellini lays bare some of her life in "Some of Me," an autobiography that reads like a prism -- it splits her life into many images, while never really forming a whole. It's an intriguing read, with plenty of interesting details about a unique life, but somehow Rossellini never quite bares her soul.
Rosselini writes about her childhood in Italy, with movie icon Ingrid Bergman as a mother, and revolutionary filmmaker Roberto Rossellini as a father. She reluctantly entered acting -- and almost stopped forever when her first film was a flop -- and became a Lancôme cosmetics model, only to be fired for her age. She tells of her son's adoption, her battle with scoliosis, her failed marriage to Martin Scorsese, and the background of her vast mixed family.
"Some of Me" is less like an autobiography than snapshots of Rossellini's life. It's non-linear, darting from adulthood to childhood to adolescence with no order. She doesn't explain much about her husbands and lovers, but explains plenty about the wet nurse who cared for her and her twin sister as babies.
Rossellini gives the feeling of being at peace with the world -- she's gotten past her initial heartbreaks and problems. Some strong emotions -- grief at her mother's loss, anger at Lancôme's attitude towards her -- seep through. But Rossellini never really bares her deeper emotions or her soul. This book is like having a deep conversation with her: you will hear about her life, but won't be able to really get down and deep.
Despite that, Rosselini has a bright style, full of melancholy and humor. She relates conversations with her now-dead parents, talks about pelting the paparazzi with rocks, and Audrey Hepburn's dirty fingernails.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Angela Richardson on November 28, 2001
Format: Hardcover
My mom and I have this barometer of how personable a celebrity seems. If they seem like someone we'd get along with, we say he/she could "live on our street". I liked Isabella so much, she could be my next-door neighbour! (I'm even pretty sure she wouldn't mind that I just called her by her first name!)

I loved this book! It's funny and real, and Ms. Rossellini comes across so charmingly, flaws and all. It's not a linear autobiography--it skips about from her childhood to early adulthood willy-nilly, and doesn't strictly stick to reporting things that happened in her life. She gives a lot of insight into her own personal philosophy that somehow gives the book a much more friendly, conversational tone than the typical memoir. If I had to have a complaint, I'd wish that she were a little more gossipy about her famous husbands/boyfriends, but that's just not her style.
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