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Some Pig!: A Charlotte's Web Picture Book Hardcover – October 31, 2006


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Hardcover, October 31, 2006
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 2
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (October 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060781610
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060781613
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #252,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

E. B. White, the author of such beloved classics as Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little, and The Trumpet of the Swan, was born in Mount Vernon, New York. He graduated from Cornell University in 1921 and, five or six years later, joined the staff of The New Yorker magazine, then in its infancy. He died on October 1, 1985, and was survived by his son and three grandchildren.

Mr. White's essays have appeared in Harper's magazine, and some of his other books are: One Man's Meat, The Second Tree from the Corner, Letters of E. B. White, Essays of E. B. White, and Poems and Sketches of E. B. White. He won countless awards, including the 1971 National Medal for Literature and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, which commended him for making a "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children."

During his lifetime, many young readers asked Mr. White if his stories were true. In a letter written to be sent to his fans, he answered, "No, they are imaginary tales . . . But real life is only one kind of life—there is also the life of the imagination."



Maggie Kneen, the illustrator of Daddy's Little Boy by Billy Collins, Daddy's Little Girl by Bobby Burke, Babe by Dick King-Smith, and other picture books, lives in Cheshire, England.


More About the Author

E.B. White, the author of twenty books of prose and poetry, was awarded the 1970 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal for his children's books, Stuart Little and Charlotte's Web. This award is now given every three years "to an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have, over a period of years, make a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children." The year 1970 also marked the publication of Mr. White's third book for children, The Trumpet of the Swan, honored by The International Board on Books for Young People as an outstanding example of literature with international importance. In 1973, it received the Sequoyah Award (Oklahoma) and the William Allen White Award (Kansas), voted by the school children of those states as their "favorite book" of the year.

Born in Mount Vernon, New York, Mr. White attended public schools there. He was graduated from Cornell University in 1921, worked in New York for a year, then traveled about. After five or six years of trying many sorts of jobs, he joined the staff of The New Yorker magazine, then in its infancy. The connection proved a happy one and resulted in a steady output of satirical sketches, poems, essays, and editorials. His essays have also appeared in Harper's Magazine, and his books include One Man's Meat, The Second Tree from the Corner, Letters of E.B. White, The Essays of E.B. White and Poems and Sketches of E.B. White. In 1938 Mr. White moved to the country. On his farm in Maine he kept animals, and some of these creatures got into his stories and books. Mr. White said he found writing difficult and bad for one's disposition, but he kept at it. He began Stuart Little in the hope of amusing a six-year-old niece of his, but before he finished it, she had grown up.

For his total contribution to American letters, Mr. White was awarded the 1971 National Medal for Literature. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy named Mr. White as one of thirty-one Americans to receive the Presidential Medal for Freedom. Mr. White also received the National Institute of Arts and Letters' Gold Medal for Essays and Criticism, and in 1973 the members of the Institute elected him to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a society of fifty members. He also received honorary degrees from seven colleges and universities. Mr. White died on October 1, 1985.

Customer Reviews

My 4 year old loves this version of the story.
stlouisbrad
This book is perfect for younger children who aren't quite ready for the full length book.
slv
Illustrations were nice but the content was quite weak.
Sharon W. Cofran

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Patrick D. Goonan on December 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a good book with a strong start and good illustrations. Certainly, the author is extremely credible and this book charms from the beginning. However, I found that it ended abruptly and I was disappointed with the ending. It seems like it was incomplete and something that a child would find a bit disturbing rather than having real finality that satisifies.

The story basically involves a girls relationship with a pig as a pet. It is very charming and there is an obvious bond between the two that is built up over the course of the story. The pig basically lives a life similar to a dog or cat with respect to its place in the family. However, at the end it is suddenly sold and there is a page that says it is now living in the manure pile of a neighbor. Huh?!

From a child's perspective, this seems like almost a tragic ending. It also comes suddenly and doesn't seem to have that happy close that is so typical of good children's literature. I guess it how it lands emotionally with a child depends upon how the parents frame the ending. However, I think this is really the job of the writer and not the parent.

I think this could have been a little better, but it is still worth buying because the rest of the text is good. The interplay of the text and illustrations really generates good emotions and a sense of story. That is partly why I was so disturbed by the abrupt ending. I'm not sure it will make sense to a child or that they will view it as necessarily happy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TF on February 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a great picture book of Charlotte's Web.

- It ends when Wilbur is sold (lots more story to tell...)

- The drawings are different than the 1973 movie (still great)

I would increase my rating if it was clearer that this picture book contains about 1/3 of the entire story. I hope the author releases more additions that continue to cover the original book in its entirety.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sushi on July 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you think that this book is the picture book version of the story, you're in for a big surprise. This book doesn't even cover 1/10th of the story in my opinion, definitely no mention of the spider, or the other animals in the barn. It only focuses on the friendship between Fern and Wilbur, and the good times they spent together. Then it ended VERY ABRUPTLY when Wilbur is sold to Fern's uncle's farm and went to live in a "menure pile". My child finds it terribly disburbing, and I was left saying, "What kind of ending is this?"

I'm giving it 2 stars for the nice illustrations. But it needs to be at least 4 times longer to cover the whole story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Danon OK on January 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The illustrations in this book are beautiful, and they are the only thing about the book that I can recommend. The book's ending is awful (I wish I had read the reviews before purchasing the book). I can see that this picture book is meant to be one in a series, but they ended this first book in a very bad way (in my opinion): the book ends with Wilbur being sold by Fern and put in a dark cellar on a manure pile (yes, you read that correctly; in a dark cellar on a manure pile - The End). That's fairly abrupt (and sad and scary!) without having the next book in the series to continue the wonderful story about Wilbur and Charlotte. The authors should have started the NEXT book with the story about Wilbur going to live with the Zuckermans, so that when we see poor Wilbur in the poop pile, we soon learn he makes a great many new and wonderful friends in Zuckerman's barn. I can't recommend the overall writing in the book, either -- it's as if the author was recounting the facts of the story - not telling the story. Buyers should look elsewhere for a book aimed at the smaller tots that tells the story of Wilbur (and Charlotte).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By vintagek on September 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I bought this for my 3 year old, who loves pigs. We read the book-- great illustrations, good story about a little girl caring for her best friend and showing respect to animals. Then, the last few pages came. Her pig is sold, and then has to live in a manure pile in a cellar instead of the beautiful yard he was accustomed to roaming freely. If we read it again, I will skip the last few pages. 3 stars for a good story line until then, and great illustrations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By stlouisbrad on January 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 4 year old loves this version of the story. The classic book it is based upon simply has far too many words for her at this age. The illustrations are wonderful and evoke memories from my own childhood on my grandparents farm. The story is just the right length for a toddler or pre-school age child. No bedtime is complete without this story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Heiss on June 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Baby Wilbur is so darling.

This book illustrates a full chapter of E.B. White's "Charlotte's Web" and keeps Garth Williams' classic illustration style. Maggie Kneen does an excellent job with the illustrations, adding more story to the story with her excellent visuals.
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Format: Hardcover
This lovely picture book, based on a short part of the beloved E. B. White classic, is perfect to introduce the story and characters to younger children who are not yet ready for longer chapter books. The story focuses on Fern's love for Wilbur, omitting details of the original story that might be disturbing for a younger audience (such as the fact that the runt of the litter was usually killed). We follow Wilbur's adventures when he lives with Fern, and the story ends when he is sold to Mr. Zuckerman and goes to live in his barn, where he will eventually meet Charlotte (she does not appear in this story). The traditional, realistic artwork with its muted colors fits into the spirit of the original Garth Williams black and white illustrations, while offering new and charming visions of Wilbur's early days with Fern. The close-up perspective of Fern wheeling the dozing Wilbur and her baby doll in her doll carriage is a particularly lovely example. Highly recommended for preschool storytime, particularly with a pig or far theme. Suitable for children 3 through 8.
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