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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on January 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
As a fan of Supertramp since I was 14, I waited nearly ten years for this new album. After Free As A Bird and the awful Live 88 I didn't expect anything. But after the opening bass solo I was blown away by that new, groovy style. It seems that they practiced a bit during those years. The new bass player, Cliff Hugo and Lee Thornburg, former Tower Of Power-Trumpet player are fitting perfectly in this new style. It is no more Supertramp as in the 70's and 80's but a great beginning for the next part of Supertramp's history in the 90's.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on April 29, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Led by Rick Davies, Supertramp recorded two albums without there *other* famous leader, Roger Hodgson, 1985's dark-but-still-excellent "Brother Where You Bound," and 1987's lighter, poppier "Free As A Bird" (currently out of print). Both are great albums, but there was still a sense that Roger Hodgson's shadow was still looming over the group. Then, without making any official announcements at all, the band simply stopped. A whole decade passed, but then, at last, Supertramp got back into business. Boy, did they! After a 10-year absence, 1997's "Some Things Never Change" is the album that *finally* allowed Supertramp to emerge from Roger's shadow. Although it certainly would've been great to have Hodgson back in the band for this album---and he WAS asked---he declined to return, and so, singer/songwriter/keyboardist Rick Davies remains firmly at the helm once more. And what an album he & the band have delivered after so long---"Some Things" is simply spectacular! Song for song it is stunning. I was blown away right from the first listen, and I knew right then and there that even without Hodgson, Supertramp had returned in a big, BIG way. Five years later, "Some Things Never Change" is still my personal favorite album by the band. Like the album title suggests, the classic Supertramp hybrid of jazz, funk, pop, & rock remains firmly intact even after such a long break, with veteran members John Anthony Helliwell (saxophone) & Bob Sibenberg (drums) still onboard along with Davies to contribute to the hallmark Supertramp sound. The musicianship, songwriting, and overall *feel* of "Some Things" is truly something special. Although Supertramp have never recorded what one would call a "concept album" (though the epic title track to "Brother Where You Bound" seems to be conceptual---there was even a movie-featurette video produced for it), there really does seem to be a theme of sorts running through "Some Things Never Change," which is this: in the face of hard times, keep your chin up, because you WILL get through it. The lyrics are some of the most heartfelt that Rick Davies has ever written, real uplifting words of wisdom to hear & read (especially now in these harsh times we're currently living in), in such songs as the brilliant, atmospheric opener, "It's A Hard World," the cheerful "Get Your Act Together," the inspiring "Listen To Me Please," the blues/gospel of "Help Me Down That Road," and the album's ray-of-hope finale, "Where There's A Will." Davies' commanding singing voice and unique fingerwork on the keys remains strong after all this time, and Hodgson's replacement, Mark Hart, sounds close enough to his predecessor, and he delivers some fine vocals himself, especially on the funky "Sooner Or Later." With all due respect to the great Roger Hodgson & his marvelous contributions to the band's recorded work of the past, "Some Things Never Change" is such a good Supertramp album, that you really don't miss him. In my opinion, Rick Davies & company are carrying on without Hodgson just fine, as this album proves beyond the shadow of a doubt. "Some Things Never Change" is a joyous, uplifting album that always makes me smile, a phenomenal comeback for one of the world's greatest bands. :-)
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 19, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Yes, we miss Roger Hodgson, BUT Rick Davies not only sang more than 'Bloody Well Right' during the original lineup (as some people here seem to forget), but Davies has put together a jazzy and sophisticated album. Perhaps it is more like Steely Dan than Supertramp's more pop oriented tunes under Hodgson, but once again, this disc offers some really classy musical workings....great stuff, and for anyone who ever saw this performed live, like I did when the album was first released, all I can say is WOW! Great concert. So, for those die-hard fans afraid of change, I say, let go of the past and listen with an open mind and ear, and it will impress the heck out of you. Enjoy!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 2, 1998
Format: Audio CD
It does take you a while to get used to the jazzier Supertramp. But I like the result the more I play it. And there's enough of the old Supertramp sound to enjoy. Since Hodgson left, Supertramp's lyrics don't evoke the same soulful spiritual themes as they used to. I guess that was one thing great about the old Supertramp; the contrasts available within the same band. Nevertheless, I enjoy Live to Love You (I heard it on muzak at the mall one day!) and Get Your Act Together (listen for the Sesame Street harmonica at the beginning!). My favorite here is And the Light, which I heard was written in the spirit of reaching out to Roger to come to some understanding. Classic Rick Davies' vocals.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 12, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Whilst browsing through the local record store I came across this album. Great I thought, a new Supertramp album. I wonder what they sound like after all these years? The answer is that they still have Rick Davies on vocals but forget the old Supertramp sound. This is much more jazzy and laid back. There are snatches of what most people will be expecting (you win, I lose for example) but if you are not prepared to accept a change of direction then you will be dissapointed by this album. I was very unsure whether I liked it or not on the first couple of plays. However, this is an album that definitely grows on you. Probably not for Supertramp purists but a good effort all the same.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on January 7, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Ironically, the mass-market popularity of Supertramp rests on a the hummable hooks of its middle-period albums. Thus, I can only guess that the many criticisms of this particular album come from fans to whom "Logical Song" seems the pinnacle of musical achievement. Too bad for them... they're missing out on some of the best work of this band's career. This is most certainly a Supertramp album to rival (and in some ways, exceed) the best output of their halcyon days.

Yes, gone are the trite little singles of Breakfast in America. Instead, the band expands its reach, weaving a lavish musical tapestry of many scintillating instrumental threads. There's an echo here of the beautiful studio jamming of Supertramp's vastly under-rated first album. Some reviewers (All-Music Guide, shame on you) have taken this as a sign that Supertramp 'can no longer create catchy little songs.' Hey, maybe they've simply evolved beyond that sort of silliness. The tracks on Some Things Never Change sound at once familiar, yet fresh and new. But where earlier works tended to stop short, these go on, achieving their jazzy, mesmerizing potential in a full five, six, or nine minutes.

Bands move on; if you trust their vision, then you have no choice but to follow where they lead. The reward is discovering unexpected gems like this one.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Some Things Never Change, how true. I bought this not knowing what to expect. I wasn't sure if Roger was in the band or not. Roger is not part of the band, the album however is fantastic! Supertramp is one of the rare groups that origianted in the 70's that refuses to rest on its laurels. This album proves that the band is just as vitale today as they were in 1974. This album is fantastic! From the opening notes of "It's A Hard World" to "Where's There's A Will" this is bound to please long-term Supertramp fans like me and win the band some new ones. Rick has re-invented the sound of the Superramp while holding onto the magic that made them great in the start! This album is fresh..exciting!
Sure, I'd love to see Roger back. He is one of my favorite singers ..period. Yet Rick is making fantastic music, worthy of critical acclaim!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 13, 2005
Format: Audio CDVerified Purchase
In my opinion, "Some Things Never Change" is a sophisticated yet touching album that fits well with the recent Supertramp work. I enjoyed every single song in the album, especially "Sooner or Later" and "It's a Hard World". Highly recommended to anyone who appreciates Supertramp music style.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 8, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Now a permanent fixture in my car's CD changer, "Some Things Never Change" is Supertramp for the '90s: more mature, more jazzy, more at ease with itself, but still multi-layered, still catchy, still some of the best music and lyrics you'll hear out there. I have long been a fan of Rick Davies and company and with this disc they expand the realm of Supertramp, successfully bringing the musical journey they started on "Brother Where You Bound" and "Free as a Bird" closer to home and infusing their new sound with that of Supertramp's roots. This is simply a great experience.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 4, 1999
Format: Audio CD
It suprises me to hear so many negative reviews of this album. Its not 1979 anymore, Toto! As many have said, its very jazzy, and bluesy too. If you miss Roger, buy his great solo projects. But Supertramp has moved on!
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