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Some Thoughts Concerning Education: (Including Of the Conduct of the Understanding) (Dover Philosophical Classics) Paperback – Bargain Price, March 29, 2007


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Product Details

  • Series: Dover Philosophical Classics
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (March 29, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486455513
  • ASIN: B00A19PNYI
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 4.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,578,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

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"Highly recommended for general readers or professionals seeking to understand the origins of many current educational theories and practices."--Choice


--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

John W. Yolton is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Rutgers University, New Jersey, and formerly General Editor of the Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke. Jean Yolton is a librarian and independent scholar. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John P. Irish on July 7, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an outstanding volume from one of the most important thinkers of Western civilization. This is a bridge linking the two major classics from Locke, An Essay concerning Human Understanding and the Two Treatises of Government. In this volume, we see Locke's dependence on Stoic philosophy (especially that of Seneca) and the effect that Aristotelian philosophy had on him.
"As the Strength of the Body lies chiefly in being able to endure Hardships, so also does that of the Mind. And the great Principle and Foundation of all Vertue and Worth, is . . . That a Man is able to deny himself his own Desires, cross his own Inclinations, and purely follow what Reason directs as best, tho' that appetite lean the other way." And how does one do this? Locke's answer is through education (i.e., through habit).
Anyone wishing to understand the thought and philosophy of Locke, can not afford to ignore this volume in the corpus of Lockean writings. This edition is a very scholarly edition, there is another modern edition available as well. To bad the editors of the Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke are not very organized, at the rate these volumes are being produced, the complete writings will not be available during my lifetime.
The world needs a modern edition of the writings of Locke, he is too important a thinker not to have this - if nothing else, for us inspiring Lockean scholars. :o)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Henner on January 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this thinking the table of contents would be nice. Well, it was nice but the formatting of the book is entirely unprofessional. It looks as if someone simply copied and pasted a tabled word document into an Amazon kindle publishing app.

Worse of all - no page numbers. Locations are useless when a syllabus asks one to read x and y pages starting from page z.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Graham H. Seibert TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 5, 2012
This is amazingly accessible for a book written 320 years ago. A small bit of his vocabulary is archaic, and his delivery is more wordy than is common in modern prose. Still, today's reader will find interest in the ideas, not just the book's place in history.

To place him in history, Locke's life spanned the last three quarters of the 17th century. He followed the scientific revolution initiated by Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton, whom he admired, and the philosopher Thomas Hobbes. An early philosophe, he predated Burke, Hume, Voltaire and Rousseau by about a century.

While Locke was a doctor, certainly the worst advice in the book has to do with medicine. Although the scientific revolution had begun, it had not progressed to the point of evidence-based theories of disease. As one example, Locke proposes that his upper-class readers put their children in thin cloaks and shoes, so they will be toughened by exposure to cold. No thought of isolating them from bugs.

Fully half of the book used dedicated to the moral and ethical formation of a child. He discourses at length on what to do about children who lie, daydream, are cruel to animals, are querulous (froward), inattentive, rude, bashful and otherwise imperfectly formed in character. He is very classic in his view that one must educate the whole child. In fact, he only gets around to talking about academic subjects in the last fifth of the book, opening with the quote " Learning. -- You will wonder, perhaps, that I put learning last, especially if I tell you I think it the least part.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It constantly freezes and forces you to close the program. If you don't think that's annoying, try doing it 4 times in a row and see how badly you want to write a poor review.
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