Someone To Love 1988 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(10) IMDb 5.9/10
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SOMEONE TO LOVE centers around a movie director's (Henry Jaglom) puzzled search for romance and his attempt to find out why life and love haven't worked out quite like anyone expected.

Starring:
Henry Jaglom, Andrea Marcovicci
Runtime:
1 hour 49 minutes

Someone To Love

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Comedy
Director Henry Jaglom
Starring Henry Jaglom, Andrea Marcovicci
Supporting actors Michael Emil, Sally Kellerman, Oja Kodar, Stephen Bishop, David Frishberg, Orson Welles, Geraldine Baron, Ronee Blakley, Minda Burr, Jeff Dowd, Deborah Edwards, James Flaherty, Barbara Flood, Constance Freiberg, Paul Goldberg, Pamela Goldblum, Nedra Hainey, Robert Hallak
Studio Rainbow Releasing
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
How interesting can it be to film people's responses to loneliness, loss of love and women's liberation? New York filmmaker Henry Jaglom ("New Year's Day," "Eating") has taken the route of doing just that - filming people's responses to those subjects, and the result is one of the most profound, exciting and personal films of the 1980's. Henry Jaglom plays a film director named Danny who is shaken and perplexed by his girlfriend, Helen (remarkably played by Andrea Marcovicci) who wants to be left alone, much to Danny's chagrin, when she sleeps. After she brushes her teeth, Danny has to leave so she can sleep in peace. On that note, Danny flies to Santa Monica to see his brother (Michael Emil) who is in the real estate business, and who deplores Danny's profession insisting it isn't work, it is "play." His brother is co-owner of an antique theater that is about to be demolished after having sold it. Danny gets the creative idea to stage and film his old friends and acquaintances in the theater, and so he makes invitations to all who are lonely on Valentine's Day to attend. A surprising number of people show up including his emotional companion Helen, a singer; Dave Frishberg who plays the piano in a beautiful montage sequence; Sally Kellerman as a distraught, popular movie star who all the men flirt with; Kathryn Harrold as an actress who wants to have a family; Steven Bishop who gets to play the guitar; and even the sage Orson Welles, in his last role, as a film director who delivers profound insights on women's liberation, loneliness and filmmaking.Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Southern on May 19, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
"Always" (1985) is Henry Jaglom's masterpiece, and his most commercial and accessible work; "Someone To Love" (1987) represents a return to form for the iconoclastic filmmaker, where Jaglom (playing "Danny," a caricature of himself) invites his real-life, unmarried friends to a party and films conversations at the event in cinema-verite mode. "Danny" asks his friends a series of questions about why they have chosen to spend their lives alone. Guests include lyricist Dave Frishberg, actresses Kathryn Harrold and Ronnee Blakely, and singer/songwriter Stephen Bishop. As Leonard Maltin notes, some of the "actors'" thoughts are interesting, others dull. The film, however, becomes a gem because lengthy commentaries by the late Orson Welles (on the subject of... what else?... relationships) precede and follow the party. From moment to moment, Welles is completely stunning, the views he espouses intriguing and controversial (at one point, Orson raises the question of whether or not slavery is wrong!!!). Moreover, Jaglom frequently splices gorgeous musical interludes (by Frishberg, Bishop, and Andrea Marcovicci) in-between his guests' thoughts. Near the end of the picture, Jaglom (either intentionally or unintentionally) raises the question of whether or not his method of filmmaking entails an invasion of privacy. These elements alone make the picture a must-see.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rsoonsa VINE VOICE on February 26, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
In the waning days before the demolition of the Mayfair Music Hall in Santa Monica, California, the brilliant and unconventional director, Henry Jaglom, created this unique film featuring the final screen performance of Orson Welles, and utilizing Jaglom's customary methods of actor improvisation coupled with perceptive editing, with the result being a moving tour de force of romantic sensibility. A gathering of single entertainment types meets by Jaglom's invitation at the theater on Valentine's Day, sharing perceptions of relationship success and failure as the director's powerful sense of angst rises to the surface with the camera being his investigative companion. Acting honors shall go to Sally Kellerman, whose performance explores most deeply of all her self-awareness of vulnerability and emotional need, and to Andrea Marcovicci, who plays a part as Jaglom's current love, and who sings beautifully as well, and as always. Jaglom's output has been remarkable because of his steadfast determination to create genuinely independent cinema and SOMEONE TO LOVE is a prime example of his talent for showcasing a personal point of view in such a manner that it touches upon the universal.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bomojaz on April 12, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
An experimental film, a movie within a movie. A filmmaker throws a Valentine's Day party at a theatre that's about to be torn down and invites a bunch of people who are alone; he then goes about asking them why they are alone and do they like it. It's all pretty pretentious and self-indulgent, with some very banal comments made about a very banal society. Orson Welles appears, his last screen role before he died, and he among them all has some of the most banal things to say. There are a few interesting points, a few of the characters reveal some things to ponder (and generally be sad about), but it's not enough. So much of the acting has an improvised feel about it that one begins to wonder if a lot of it actually was. Jazz fans will notice Dave Frishberg in a fairly big acting and singing part.
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