Someone Would Have Talked: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the Conspiracy to Mislead History
 
 


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Someone Would Have Talked: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the Conspiracy to Mislead History [Hardcover]

Larry Hancock
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Building on the research of Russell, Fonzi, Summers, Griggs, and many many others, Larry Hancock has masterfully synthesized their research with much of his own. The results are powerful, compelling, and represent a major step forward in our understanding of the assassination. As anyone that is familiar with Hancock and his research knows, his documentation is immaculate. Someone Would Have Talked is remarkably current. It contains much new information. Larry Hancock is a gifted critical thinker. Fortunately, he gives the reader the benefit of his reasoned conclusions. --John Simpkin, Education Forum

Larry Hancock is always the first person I call to learn about the latest documents and discoveries, especially those involving CIA anti-Castro operations and mob associates like David Morales and John Martino. His work continues to break new ground and should be read by everyone interested in the JFK assassination. --Lamar Waldron, author of Ultimate Sacrifice

There have been two official U.S. Government investigations of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The first resulted in the Warren Commission Report. Rank with so many blatant distortions and manipulations of the evidence, its conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone assassin quickly disintegrated under objective scrutiny. But the Report's arrogant fallaciousness seeded in the public's psyche a new distrust of Government that would grow over the next decade into a trenchant and sometimes fiery force in American history. An element in that force produced enough political pressure for a new investigation and the subsequent formation of the U.S. House Select Committee on Assassinations. Congressionally mandated to "conduct a full and complete investigation" of JFK's murder, the HSCA's priority was quickly castrated. The Committee was intimidated and manipulated by the very government agencies it was investigating and its final report emerged as misleading as the Warren Commission's. While the HSCA report masked a truncated investigation, it also unavoidably left slivers of light revealing certain areas of inquiry the Committee dared not pursue. The forces governing the Committee knew that pursuing leads in those areas would have opened doors it did not want opened, doors marked with the names of operators and assets of the Government's intelligence community. Now, with his experience and analytical acumen, Larry Hancock has pushed wide those doors, naming names and detailing the culpable conspiratorial associations. Among the most respected researchers of the JFK assassination, Hancock has produced an awesomely comprehensive and impressive work of compelling validity. A "must-read" in the field. --Gaeton Fonzi, former staff investigator for the U.S. House Committee on

Larry Hancock is always the first person I call to learn about the latest documents and discoveries, especially those involving CIA anti-Castro operations and mob associates like David Morales and John Martino. His work continues to break new ground and should be read by everyone interested in the JFK assassination. --Lamar Waldron, author of Ultimate Sacrifice

There have been two official U.S. Government investigations of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The first resulted in the Warren Commission Report. Rank with so many blatant distortions and manipulations of the evidence, its conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone assassin quickly disintegrated under objective scrutiny. But the Report's arrogant fallaciousness seeded in the public's psyche a new distrust of Government that would grow over the next decade into a trenchant and sometimes fiery force in American history. An element in that force produced enough political pressure for a new investigation and the subsequent formation of the U.S. House Select Committee on Assassinations. Congressionally mandated to "conduct a full and complete investigation" of JFK's murder, the HSCA's priority was quickly castrated. The Committee was intimidated and manipulated by the very government agencies it was investigating and its final report emerged as misleading as the Warren Commission's. While the HSCA report masked a truncated investigation, it also unavoidably left slivers of light revealing certain areas of inquiry the Committee dared not pursue. The forces governing the Committee knew that pursuing leads in those areas would have opened doors it did not want opened, doors marked with the names of operators and assets of the Government's intelligence community. Now, with his experience and analytical acumen, Larry Hancock has pushed wide those doors, naming names and detailing the culpable conspiratorial associations. Among the most respected researchers of the JFK assassination, Hancock has produced an awesomely comprehensive and impressive work of compelling validity. A "must-read" in the field. --Gaeton Fonzi, former staff investigator for the U.S. House Committee on

From the Publisher

Forty plus years after the murder of President Kennedy, the same intuitive and popular belief exists that was common in the first hours after his assassination - that his murder occurred as the result of a conspiracy. The document releases, transcripts and tapes which have become available in the last decade only serve to confirm how many individuals and witnesses held this belief and expressed it privately but for the most part did not enter the public record. Someone Would Have Talked is supported not only with the normal references and bibliography but also with an extensive library of exhibits and documents. Exhibits range from contemporary newspaper articles through testimony and telephone transcripts to diaries, investigative reports and memoranda.

From the Author

As author Larry Hancock states in his Foreword, "This history is no longer buried in the archives, it's in front of you. As the jury you have to make the final call based on objective evaluation and judgment. Belief "beyond reasonable doubt" will be your decision. The history here is real, not "canned" in a report or a textbook - the decision for or against conspiracy and cover-up is yours."

From the Inside Flap

Unlike most books on this topic, Someone Would Have Talked bases its analysis of the Kennedy assassination on clear evidence of facts contained in direct conversations with those involved in the plot and documents containing evidence of what really took place. Assumptions, speculation and fantasy have allowed the truth to elude the American public.

Someone Would Have Talked pulls back the curtain on these far-fetched theories with unfettered access and clear and convincing evidence never discussed before. Someone Would Have Talked ignores the fiction of past books on the subject and provides nothing more than what America has been seeking for 40 years... the TRUTH! Those that deny a conspiracy scoff, stating if there was a conspiracy someone would have talked after all this time.

Someone Would Have Talked tackles that objection head on, examining a number of examples of credible people who have talked. Real people, many of them involved in the secret war against Castro and the U.S. Government project intended to assassinate JFK. Someone Would Have Talked evaluates these leaks and confessions, showing the connections between the individuals involved and demonstrating the evolution of a conspiracy.

Someone Would Have Talked goes beyond just proving a conspiracy to murder JFK. Over 14,000 documents, White House diaries, telephone logs and executive tape recordings detail how the new President managed a cover-up which changed the future of our country. A second conspiracy designed to mislead the nation, the world, indeed, history itself.

From the Back Cover

They have talked ... you need to know what they said ... "They're going to kill him. They're going to kill him when he gets to Texas." John Martino, former Cuban prisoner and anti-Castro activist "We were getting all sorts of rumors that the President was going to be assassinated in Dallas; there were no if's, and's or but's about it." Marty Underwood, Democratic National Committee Political Advance Man "...the threat of November 18 was posed by a mobile, unidentified rifleman with a high-powered rifle and scope" Secret Service Agent Memorandum "Now they're going to find out about Cuba, the guns, New Orleans and everything." Jack Ruby to his Jailer "Washington's word to me was that it would hurt foreign relations if I alleged conspiracy - whether I could prove it or not. I was just to charge Oswald with plain murder and go for the death penalty. Johnson had Cliff Carter call me three or four times that weekend." Dallas District Attorney Henry Wade "If I told you what I really know, it would be very dangerous to the country. Our whole political system could be disrupted." FBI Director Hoover In response to whether or not Oswald had killed the President "Well, we took care of that S.O.B." David Morales, former Chief of Operations, CIA Miami JM/WAVE station and Consultant to the Deputy Director of the Joint Chiefs for Operational Counter Insurgency and Special Operations following a tirade against John Kennedy for his treachery at the Bay of Pigs.

About the Author

Larry Hancock is a leading historian-researcher in the JFK assassination. Co-author with Connie Kritzberg of November Patriots and author of the 2003 research analysis publication titled also Someone Would Have Talked. In addition, Hancock has published several document collections addressing the 112th Army Intelligence Group, John Martino, and Richard Case Nagell. In 2000, Hancock received the prestigious Mary Ferrell New Frontier Award for the contribution of new evidence in the Kennedy assassination case. In 2001, he was also awarded the Mary Ferrell Legacy Award for his contributions of documents released under the JFK Act.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1 "THEY'RE GOING TO KILL KENNEDY!"

Miami Florida, November 22, 1963.

John Martino knew that President Kennedy was going to be killed in Dallas. He didn't know the details but he knew the people that were doing it - and he had helped them in small ways during his trips to Dallas that fall.

Martino was nervous that day, wanting to distance himself from what was going to happen and knowing that he couldn't. He announced to his family that he would paint the breakfast room in his house. But he had also asked his son, Edward, to stay home from school that Friday. No reason given and no explanation offered. During the morning, John asked Edward not to help paint but instead to watch television and to notify him immediately of any special news or bulletins.

Later, while catching a piece of coverage of the President's travels on the radio, John Martino exclaimed to his wife, "Flo, they're going to kill him. They're going to kill him when he gets to Texas."

That afternoon when Edward ran to his father with the news of an attack on the President, he watched his father turn white as a sheet. As the afternoon passed, John Martino began receiving an ongoing series of telephone calls from Texas.

Martino's wife, Florence, and other members of his family kept John Martino's words of November 22 strictly to themselves for decades, initially denying anything of the sort when questioned by the House Select Committee on Assassinations. The Committee had been given a lead by one of Martino's close friends.

However, months before her death, Florence Martino related the truth and details to author Anthony Summers, with confirmation from her son. Martino's actual involvement only became popularly known with the publication of Anthony Summers' article in Vanity Fair magazine in 1994.

John Martino provided more details about the conspiracy to murder President Kennedy than were indicated by his remarks to his family on November 22. He did so only to two people. One was a close friend and business partner; the other was one of the reporters who covered Martino's return from imprisonment in Cuba. In both cases, he talked about the matter almost in the manner of a confession and only in the last months of his life. In order to appreciate and evaluate Martino's remarks, it is necessary to fully understand the life of John Martino, his associates, his activities in 1963 and his activities immediately following the assassination.

In 1963 and 1964, Martino very publicly told a much different story - a story of Lee Oswald as a Castro-sponsored assassin. That same story was repeated so frequently that it eventually began to sound very much like a "script," with other individuals touting similar claims. At the time, it was striking enough to bring John Martino to the attention of J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI. This was fortunate for us, since it is the FBI inquiry and its related documents that provide us with much of the background we need to put Martino in the proper historical perspective.

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