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89 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich, rich read
This is one of a handful of books I've read that changed the way I look at myself -- and another on that short list is Simple Abundance which I'm working through for the 3rd time as I write "morning pages" daily. This is NOT a sequel to SA -- in lots of ways it doesn't seem to be written by the same Sarah -- but by a more mature, more worldly wise, more...
Published on December 1, 1999

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116 of 128 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More appropriately: Breaking Up 101
I am a nineteen-year-old college student. I have never been married, and currently have no prospects of doing so. I struggle through mid-terms. I live in a dormitory with a group of amazing friends, my second family. My life is hopelessly and joyously flawed.
When I finished reading Simple Abundance and returned it to my bookshelf with a satisfied sigh, I left...
Published on December 11, 1999 by Stacey Elza


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Something More - Inspiring Reading, March 22, 2000
By 
Kristine (Salt Lake City, Utah) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
I had already read Simple Abundance (SA) and found that very uplifting. I bought SA for my friends and mother. I just finished Something More and found it a wonderful book too. I was especially moved by SBB's section on the passing of the neighborhood child. Her writing seems so very personal and deeply moving to me. Each chapter and section gave me so much to think about. I loved it and would highly recommend it. Her writing has really changed my life for the better and for what it's worth my deepest thanks and gratitude go out to SBB for sharing the works with me. This book and SA really made a positive difference in my life.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uninspiring, banal breathnach., July 3, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
Sarah Ban Breathnach steals. Doesn't anyone remember that it was Emerson, and the Transcendentalist crowd who first coined and developed the term, "Divine Discontent?" Throughout her book, she seems to offer ideas or terms of expressions as if they spun organically and originially from her own mind. Ms. Breathnach offers many New-Agey type ideas that are either silly, or else you're sure to have read them years ago in women's magazines. She really needs to sit down, reflect, and truly come from an authentic place from within her own soul. What she says and how she says it doesn't ring true.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Left me looking for something more, October 1, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
This book personally summoned me at the airport bookstore. As I began reading on the plane, I felt I was ready for my archelogical dig. Good concept, but it never went anywhere. I have an envelope full of pictures, what do I do with them??? Breathnach truly loves the written word, but too much of the book is reciting others works, without much original fodder. For instance, I read Black and Blue, it was quoted much to extensively. If books like this are calling out to you, try The Invitation, by Oriah Mountain Dreamer.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightened Self-Interest, not Selfishness, January 28, 2003
By A Customer
I bought this book a couple of years ago, read it from cover to cover, then placed it in my bookshelf. I picked it up again this weekend and wondered why I put it on the shelf in the first place. I guess I was not ready.
Warning to the people pleasers: it can wake you up.
Sarah was not suggesting that women should abandon their families. In one story, a woman chose to work out the issues with her husband instead of engaging in an affair with what could have been her "soul-mate." In another story, a mother discovered her love of birds, which did not involve the abandonment of her children. In yet another story, a copywriter followed her husband around the world while writing biographies about various people.
To those who believed she was condoning selfishness, what book WERE you reading?
Sarah encourages enlightened self-interest. She does not give you step by step instructions, your authentic self is your own. She does encourage you to listen to that still small voice within, re-discover your hidden passions, have respect for yourselves. If you don't do it, something will happen and you will be forced to do it.
If you have a charmed life, congratulations. You don't need this book. Continue to focus only on the happy-happy things.
However, I think all of us will face disappointment and adversity at some time in our lives. To recognize our authentic selves will help us get through those tough times, whether we are married or single. No matter how old we are. Whether or not we have children.
Is there no room in this world for sadness and despair? I can sense the bitter overtones too, however, I don't see it as a distraction. She is giving us the gift of sharing her experience with the world. I believe it helps others who have experienced setbacks in life to not feel alone.
I don't see how a single woman can be discouraged getting married after reading SM. If anything, I believe she will acknowledge her gifts and know who she is. Instead of asking a man, "Aren't I worthy?," She can look him in the eye and say, "I am worthy." She will marry a man worthy of her respect instead spending her life with someone who treats her like day old Krispy Kreme doughnuts (I do understand, however, that for some people a doughnut is a doughnut, but I digress...)
SM is not for everyone. I for one am inspired. It is helping me to find a balance between the needs of my soul and the needs of the world. For too long I've let other people's opinions determine who I was and how I felt about myself.
I don't believe any book can satisfy everyone. If SM did not resonate with you, express your authentic self, but don't discourage others from reading it. Let them read the book themselves.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Big Swing From "Simple Abundance"., November 13, 2000
By 
After having sold at least 50 copies everywhere I went in my initial praises of "Simple Abundance", I was quite disappointed at this book. After reading it, I personally knew of only one woman who would relate; a newly divorced woman with grown children. I sent her a copy and received a thank you note saying that the book was a life saver/changer for HER.
Hmmm... So what happened? "Simple Abundance" appealed to me since it seemed to reach "everywoman". Tragically, it appears that the enormous success of that book changed the author's cozy life and "Something More" has a tinge of anger at her new solitary life.
As such, I would recommend this book to single women or women with grown children searching for that "something more" - whether it be in career or relationships. But, if you are in the throes of a young family - you already have your "more than enough" and this book is not for you.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What she left out., May 25, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
I can say that after reading SA twice I was SADLY disapointed in this book. In fact I plan to burn it when I get the chance. If she has resently left her husband or vice versa then she needed time to heal not time to write a new book "TO FEED THE WOMEN OF AMERICA'S SOULS." There is a love and a deep spirtiual beauty to a loving marriage. I feel she is calling to women to look for this perfect man who does not exist. This mythical man who's soul purpose is too serve you. Sorry to disapoint Ms. Breathnach but this man does not exist. I feel that she is calling women to leave their husbands in droves. I would have put minus five stars if they would have let me. Ladies/Gentlemen if you want a man to love you more, learn to love yourself more/frist. What to find a man. Stop looking and let God(s) bring them too you.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Yuck, June 10, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
This book was a complete disappointment to me. The most disappointing thing was that it somewhat undermines what I loved about Simple Abundance. The concept of Gratitude was a major theme in that SA and it has had a profound impact on my life. This book is basically telling you that gratitude is not enough. Simple Abundance is one of my favorite books ever, and Something More is one of my LEAST favorite books ever. I don't know if I have ever felt such a dichotomy between books from the same author.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some valuable insights, but often frustrating, April 6, 2004
By 
Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self is an unusual book. I have never read the author's celebrated Simple Abundance, so I had no basis for comparison with her previous work. Something More is different from most self-help books that I've read in that it's more of a meditation than a specific framework for solving particular problems.
The book's intention is to inspire women to search for "something more" in their lives through a collection of the author's personal experiences and examples from lives of other women, both fictional and real. She draws lessons from these assorted stories and presents them in a series of short, often one- or two-page chapters. There are also a number of exercises at the end of six sections of the book, aimed to give the reader an opportunity to rediscover her "authentic self."
I found the book to be frustrating at times. First of all, the short sub-chapters are often disjointed and there appears to be very little flow in the development of ideas. Rather, the entire book consists more or less of short meditations, some of which are quite insightful, while others are simply impenetrable. Second, the author was trying to resolve some deep personal issues while working on this book, and this unfortunately taints both the lessons and the overall mood of the book. Recently divorced, she was clearly still very bitter. For this reason, she can often come across as advocating selfishness to women, although I think that this is merely her way of dealing with a personal disappointment and struggling to regain self-confidence. Finally, the exercises that she suggests might be helpful to some (especially people who have saved many mementos from their childhood, since her idea of rediscovering your authentic self involves going through these old items), but they struck me as somewhat contrived and ultimately not very helpful.
Nevertheless, I did enjoy reading the book and appreciated some of its insights. Some of the discussion is quite thought-provoking and can certainly help one gain confidence, self-awareness, and resilience, especially in difficult times of one's life.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Book for Women!, June 5, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
I read this book about 2 mos. ago and have recommended it to many women since. My only regret is that I did not read this when I was much younger -- I think I would not have made as many mistakes in my life. A great book for women struggling to gain self-esteem and direction!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Yes, Virginia, there is something more, but not in SM:EYAS., December 15, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self (Hardcover)
I'm glad I read this one in the store. Sure, there's a lot of truth in it -- that's what cliches are all about. If you want or need to hear it again, fine; decent writing is more pleasant to read than some of what's out there. But how much chicken soup and small stuff do we need? Give me the meat in Man's Search for Meaning, The Samurai's Garden, or Undoing Depression. From Victor Frankl's MSFM: "A human being is not one thing among others; 'things' determine each other, but 'man' is ultimately self-determining. What he becomes -- within the limits of endowment and environment -- he has made out of himself. In the concentration camps, for example, in this living laboratory and on this testing ground, we watched and witnessed some of our comrades behave like swine while others behaved like saints. Man has both potentialities within himself; which one is actualized depends on decisions but not on conditions." From Richard O'Connor's UD: "Having been told from childhood on that we are our brother's keeper, we can't abandon that burden without feeling that we have failed. We can anesthetize ourselves with alcohol or television, we can amass the trappings of success, but we live a meaningless life....You can't cure unhappiness by giving all your money away; but if you can cultivate a true generosity of spirit, you can't be depressed....By reaching out to someone in pain, maybe to show you understand, maybe just to express sympathy and support...the sufferer is comforted. But the person who took a risk and reached out is enriched. She's learned that she herself, just by virtue of being herself, has something valuable to share....The paranoid, self-centered 'I've got mine' outlook leads to depression; the expansive, inclusive 'Let's work together' attitude, though uncomfortable and challenging, is life-affirming and joyful."
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Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self
Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self by Sarah Ban Breathnach (Hardcover - Oct. 1998)
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