Somewhere South of Here and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.99
  • Save: $1.40 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Somewhere South of Here Paperback – May 28, 2002


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.59
$1.50 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Somewhere South of Here + Eddie's Bastard: A Novel
Price for both: $24.60

Buy the selected items together
  • Eddie's Bastard: A Novel $12.01

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 66%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (May 28, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060084375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060084370
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,590,232 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Kowalski made a good impression with his sentimental first novel, Eddie's Bastard, and continues the story here as he takes hero Billy Mann out to Santa Fe on his motorbike to see if he can trace the mother who gave him away as a baby to be raised by his grandfather. There is no one left in Billy's life except Mildred, his grandfather's elderly companion, who acts like a widow in the wake of his death, and so Billy, now an aspiring writer, feels stifled in his upstate New York hometown. Once in Santa Fe, he meets a sinister Latino neighbor who tells him the girl working at the local cantina may be his sister; through her, Billy finds his mother, dying slowly of cancer in a hospital miles away. He nurses her faithfully in her closing days without ever telling her who he is, starts an affair with Consuelo, a Mexican-born former trapeze artist who is now a singer, quarrels with her, then goes back home and helps Mildred fight off efforts to close down a shelter for unwed mothers she has started in the family's old house. In the end, who should come back, repentant and pregnant, but Consuelo ("`I love you, Beelee.' `I love you, too,' I said. `I know that,' she said.") If all this sounds a little artless, it is. Kowalski has a relaxed, easygoing style, and one or two touching moments shine, but Billy is so utterly without affect, and the other characters are sketched so loosely, that the narrative feels severely underpopulated. This book suffers from a bad case of second-novel syndrome. Agent, Anne Hawkins. 10-city author tour.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Kowalski continues the story of Billy Mann, whose unconventional childhood was chronicled in Eddie's Bastard (1999). That novel concerned Billy's coming to terms with his dead father's family and their legacy of failed opportunities. Now, with his beloved grandfather dead, Billy sets out to find the mother who abandoned him, traveling from upstate New York to Santa Fe, her last known address. What he finds there are the remnants of several more dysfunctional families, his own and those of his girlfriend, a Latina singer and former circus performer who talks to angels. Kowalski's work should appeal to readers who like John Irving. Both writers are old-fashioned storytellers who favor incident-rich plots driven by idiosyncratic characters. Similar to the heroes of Hotel New Hampshire and Cider House Rules, Billy is an intelligent innocent whose wanderings bring him in contact with a host of odd, wounded, usually tenderhearted souls. There is an inescapable sentimentality at the root of all this that will seem cloying to some, moving to others, but on the whole, it is hard to resist the feel-good mood that Kowalski creates. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

William Kowalski is the author of five novels and five Rapid Reads (shorter works for beginning adult readers of English). His first novel, EDDIE'S BASTARD, won the 2001 South African Ama-Boeke prize and hit the #5 spot on the Times of London bestseller list. He has twice been nominated for the Ontario Library Association's Golden Oak Award. His books have been translated into fifteen languages. You can visit him online at http://williamkowalski.com.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By K. Ferrio on September 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I haven't read Kowalski's first book, "Eddie's Bastard." But I will. The neat thing about "Somewhere South of Here" is an honestly as sure and unrelenting as the Sonoran sun. This is raw stuff, unpretentious and real. Kowalski understands that less is more, particularly in dialogue. I'll admit an awe for the Southwest, which Kowalski almost certainly shares from his equidistant Brooklyn home. His treatment of that enchanted landscape and its people is eerily real. Here, again, the power of Kowalski's writing lies in what he does not write. Rather than bury the reader in a doomed attempt to cage what cannot be spoken, Kowalski distills essential impressions. And he makes it look easy. Here is a man who has found his voice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I won't give you a summary of this charming story, since the editorial reviews have already done that. But I will tell you that this sequel to Eddie's Bastard, Kowalski's first book, doesn't disappoint. A word of advice: IF you haven't yet read EB, do that first. It's a special treat -- one of my all-time favorite novels. Starting with EB will only enhance your enjoyment of Somewhere South of Here. There! That's two recommendations all in one. Enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I loved Eddie's Bastard, and even re-read it before emabarking on SSOH. Unfortunately, I feel that Billy got lost. He seemed a battered and embittered soul--so unlike the young man in the first novel. He departs to New Mexico seeking his mother, yet doesn't have the courage to tell her it is him. His releationship with Consuelo is based on chemistry, and no other character is drawn with any depth. Particulary El Perrero, who seems to be there to make Billy question what his own father would have been like if he had lived. The ending is hokey--to the extent that the Mann mansion is a home for unwed mothers. Billy grew up with love, even if the style was unconventional.
I was also aggravated that this novel covered such a short period of time--and the ending with the pregnancy and completed novel seemed far too open.
It was an easy read, but not nearly as fulfilling as Eddie's Bastard.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "capricornlady" on February 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Somewhere South of Here is a disappointing sequel to Eddie's Bastard. While I loved the first novel, South of Here didn't have the same appeal.
Billy Mann departs Mannville and heads South in a quest to find the mother who abandoned him as a baby. In Santa Fe, amongst the cast of characters he befriends is Ralph a student from the local university, El Perrero a half crazed neighbour, a love interest in the guise of Consuela, a singer at the local bar. He finally meets his mother - without too much difficulty. Sky is ill and Billy agonises over whether or not to tell her that she is his mother.
Its an easy, but disappointing read and certainly not the worse book I've ever read. To be honest the story was too predictable, too ordinary with no surprises. I think perhaps the author should just have stopped at Eddies Bastard as the same continuity and interest is lacking in South of Here.
Sorry, but I would give this one a miss or wait until its in your local library.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Baranyai on January 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a thoroughly enjoyable and very well well written sequel to the author's first book "Eddie's Bastard". In this book we find Billy Mann travelling to New Mexico in order to find his real mother who abandoned him at birth. The characters he meets along the way spring to life from the pages and you can almost smell the chiles frying in the New Mexico heat and be with Billy in his quest. This is an excellent book which I was lucky enough to read in one sitting and I look forward to more of Mr. Kowalski's works and I think his website is really cool too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Pasiphae on June 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Billy Mann rides to New Mexico in search of his mother at the beginning of this book. He's searching for more, of course; answers, family, community. He finds an unusual and entertaining cast of characters that includes a girl who may or may not be his half sister, a bewitching gypsy singer, a perennial student-philosopher, and a loony sniper. Enjoyable mayhem ensues. A serious subtext underlies the comic plotines; Billy is compassionate, aware, and mournful. What appeared to be such rollicking good fun (in the first novel) appears differently when viewed through the eyes of a more mature narrator. Billy cares for these broken people, and emerges at novel's end with a deepened understanding and a more complete life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By michael todd price on March 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It would have been a 5 star book if I hadn't read Eddie's Bastard first. Eddie Mann goes to Santa Fe, New Mexico to find his mother. This book was a great read from one of my new favorite authors. All three of his books have been great. Although this was probably the least great. I would reccomend this book but please read Eddies Bastard first.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Deanne Kelley on January 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was disappointed with this sequel. It covers Billy's quest to find his mother. The plot was very contrived and just didn't ring true to me for some reason.
Billy ends up in Santa Fe to look for the mother who abandoned him. He meets Consuelo, a singer and they fall in love. Billy locates his mother, but the woman he has created in his mind, can she meet his expectations?? I thought the love story was a bit simple, as was the ending.
Kowalski would have had to do a smash up job with a sequel to top "Eddie's Bastard". He did not succeed, but I will likely read more of his work in the future, since sequels are usually a letdown in most cases. I didn't hate the book, or the plot, but it left me empty, therefore I give this book 2/5 stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?