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102 of 115 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The End of an Era
Iron Maiden's golden age started with "Killers" and pretty much ended with "Somewhere in Time". All of the songs on "Somewhere" are ambitious, adding new elements to Maiden's sound. The guitar synth's found on "Somewhere" are present, but not as overpowering as on the follow-up cd "Seventh Son". Everything Maiden fans enjoy about the band are present on "Somewhere". Steve...
Published on October 12, 2004 by David Girod

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New Remastering Sorely Needed.
Don't get me wrong. This album deserves all 5 stars and there's no argument about that. But considering the fantastic sound quality of the original vinyl copy and the marvelous job Martin Birch did on the production of the album, this remastered CD version clearly misses the mark in sound quality. A new remastering is desperately needed for digital fans.
Published 20 months ago by K1


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Justified!, January 10, 2007
By 
J. K. Richter (Deployed: Kandahar Afghanistan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
Maiden had evolved into a new metal standard in 1986. Not only did they lead the metal world with the greatest artwork on covers, but their music took a new form and justifed everything they had done in the past. Iron Maiden to Powerslave were just the stepping stones to this standard classic.

The CD Starts out with CAUGHT SOMEWHERE IN TIME, a galloping bassline, and parallel guitar make it, not only a classic, but ahead of its time. The rest of the CD id in pure form. My favorite track, however, is ALEXANDER THE GREAT. The intro starts out with a whisper of that era, and slowly builds to the howl of, I feel, the battle cry of the great warrior of History.

Iron Maiden did not dissapoint with this CD. It is very well mixed and produced, and remains a standard in my collection of CD's.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A jazz lover strays into unknown territory, December 14, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
I took "Best of the Beast" out of the library to give myself a reason not to like Iron Maiden (don't ask me why) and with tracks like "Run to the Hills" and "Rime..." I was just staggered at the energy and musicianship of this outfit - I will gladly defend them on these grounds to anybody. Oh, the Wasted years I've had not knowing this group. I am further amazed at their consistency. But this album is the most solid of the lot - it gives you that thrill you get to be able to enjoy a whole album at a sitting and it's that effect which sets it apart. Each track builds as it goes along. Yet it is beautifully understated. For the record, I hate "Bring your Daughter" and had long been put off the band by macabre album covers or subject matters. But call this fun and shock value if you like, I know it's no laughing matter and evil often has a fair face. "Somewhere in time" is however, in some strange way, free of this stuff for the most part. I'm not trying to be judgmental but nor am I letting myself be non-judgmental - at the end of the day Iron Maiden aren't wise to joke or play around with the spirit world as a subject (see Seventh Son) but the vast majority of their repertoire in their hey-day is on good subject matters and is exceptionally briliant and great fun music. Buy this. Buy it. Go On. Go on go on go on!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Maiden's Most Underrated Album, October 1, 2008
By 
N_Joy (North Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
While this isn't "Number of The Beast" or "Powerslave", this is still a solid, better than average release from Iron Maiden. This was the first album that Maiden would incorporate guitar synths into their music. The synths add texture to them and make them more acessible. I'm not going to use the C word (commercial)because the songs are still very progressive and too long to be considered made for radio. Adrian Smith wrote alot of the material on here (Wasted Years, Stranger in A Strange Land, Sea of Madness) and it's obvious his song writing is more pop oriented incorporating sing along choruses and hooks galore. Pretty much after listening to this album it's not hard to see why he would do just one more album with Maiden before leaving the band for about a 10 year hiatus to go out on his own. His songwriting was heading in a different direction from the stereotypical Maiden style. Nothing wrong with that because I found his songs to be a nice change of pace. His solo on "Stranger.." is easily one of his five best of all time. The only reason I'm not giving this 5 stars is because I found "Deja Vu" and "Alexander the Great" a bit subpar. "Alexander" doesn't hold up with Maiden's other epic closing tracks like "Hallowed Be Thy Name" and "Rime of The Ancient Mariner" although it is better than "To Tame A Land". Overall this is a solid album that I feel is a slight bit better than "Seventh Son" although most people feel that was the album they perfected the guitar synths.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You never forget your first time, September 14, 2007
By 
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
Somewhere in Time will forever be my absolute favorite Iron Maiden album. Deep down I know that The Number of the Beast is probably a better album, and along with Killers and their self-titled debut are more important, but Somewhere in Time was my first exposure to Iron Maiden, and we all know that you never forget your first time.

I remember it well. Metal was pretty much off-limits in my house growing up, but through friends and furtive exposure to MTV I quickly became hooked on the stuff. I was at a neighbor's house watching MTV's Headbanger's Ball (another first for me) when the video for Wasted Years came on. I had heard of Maiden, and the band's shirts were ubiquitous at my school, but I got the impression they were some sort of ultra-Satanic band and tried to keep my distance (I know, I know, but I was a Stryper fan, so I didn't know any better). As soon as that intricate guitar opening hit my ears my jaw dropped. By the end of the video I knew that another door to the metal world had just been opened for me. This was far more complex, more intelligent, and yes more METAL than many of my favorite bands at the time, who would no longer qualify as metal in my eyes.

Through another friend I managed to score a copy of Somewhere in Time on cassette, and to my great pleasure the rest of the album was every bit as good as Wasted Years (OK, Déjà Vu kind of sucks, but the rest of the album is top notch.) I played this album over and over, amazed by the precision musicianship, melodies, powerful vocals, and sci-fi/fantasy lyrics. You just can't underestimate the impact of an album like that on my 12-year old psyche. I didn't grow up with Rush and Kansas like I should have, so an epic song like Alexander the Great seemed so exciting and groundbreaking to me, and to this day I can't listen to Stranger in a Strange Land without picturing myself as that doomed traveler.

So while there are certainly better Iron Maiden albums out there, none will ever outshine Somewhere in Time, at least in my eyes.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Maiden gets more progressive, but still delivers an excellent album, August 18, 2006
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
Somewhere In Time (1986.), Iron Maiden's sixth studio album

In the first half of the 1980's, Iron Maiden's rise in popularity had been something of legend. From storming into the New Wave of British Heavy Metal scene with their self titled debut album, the band never looked back; even in the face of line up changes that plagued them in their early career. With what is regarded as the `classic' Maiden line up in place, with Bruce Dickenson (vocals), Nicko McBrain (drums) and Adrian Smith (guitar) joining long time members Steve Harris (bass) and Dave Murray (guitar) over the course of a couple of albums, the band went on to record `Piece Of Mind' and `Powerslave'. Both classic albums, the band again showed they were the masters of the dual-guitar heavy metal onslaught with more than a fair share of rip-roaring tunes. The question was, where should the band progress from here? Songs like `Rime Of The Ancient Mariner' had more than hinted at the band's progressive ideas and indeed this was the next territory for the group to delve into. Following a mammoth (and I mean MAMMOTH!) `Powerslave' tour which lasted nearly a year and encompassed nearly 200 concerts, the band went back to the studio to record `Somewhere In Time'. One of their more now underrated albums, it was released perhaps at the height of the band's popularity. So how does this more progressive epic from Iron Maiden fare?

`Somewhere In Time' for me is an impressive development on the archetypal Maiden sound. The main change is in the form of introducing subtle synthesisers into some of the band's songs and also longer more progressive song structures overall (the album's shortest track is at 5 minutes). That said though, these changes don't weigh down the Iron Maiden sound in this album. The synthesisers aren't in your face (they are slightly more bloated on the follow-up `Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son' and the longer songs never settle into too repetitive riffs. Bruce Dickenson's vocals are an important factor in this as he carries the lyrics with a great deal of urgency which keeps the music flowing along. Sadly though, I feel the more progressive nature of this album is what makes it quite an underrated work by the band - certainly it gained a more mixed reaction from fans when in was released back in '86. For me, the guitar work on the album is of similar heaviness to previous albums and has just as much pace (songs like `Caught Somewhere In Time' fly like the wind!) Also, the album provides a good mix of more catchier numbers mixed in with the more progressive stuff to please the hardcore Maiden fans. Adrian Smith certainly shines most of all in the songwriting department on this album with fantastic songs in `Sea Of Madness', `Wasted Years' and `Stranger In A Strange Land', the latter two of which provided Iron Maiden with a couple of successful hit singles. The cover to the album is an awesome one too, have a look and see just how many references you see to previous songs by the band on it, in it's futuristic setting!

Not too long ago, the Iron Maiden catalogue got totally remastered and improved. Hence the 1998 remasters are the way to go. The remaster job is great and all of the songs shine through with no sound glitches but also the recent version features and excellent accompanying booklet. The CD itself also has an enchanced multimedia section and you can view video footage of the 'Wasted Years' and 'Stranger In A Strange Land' songs from your PC.

Title track `Caught Somewhere In Time' gets Maiden's sixth album underway. This opener is a classic epic, set up fantastically by an opening haunting riff. This song has a great brisk pace throughout which never looses momentum, helped along by some strong Dickenson vocals. Murray and Smith play out some great solos mid-way through also. The first hit single in `Wasted Years' is next up, the first of 3 great songs written by Adrian Smith on this album. Again the song has an infectious opening riff which develops it's way throughout and a proper sing along chorus which in true Maiden style. `Sea Of Madness' follows, with a much more mellow sound to it. Again, a strong chorus and also a catchy undistorted bridge with more great Dickenson vocals. `Heaven Can Wait' marks the finish to the first half of the album. This is perhaps my favourite song on here. The highlights are the bass intro with clever guitar interjections, the blistering lengthy solos and the somewhat cheesy but effective interlude. Again another song which never falls down in speed and doesn't lose interest.

`The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner' is next, another Steve Harris epic based on the 1960's film of the same title. The intro to the song is surprisingly reminiscent to the tune to later song and Maiden fan favourite `Fear Of The Dark', still it sets a gentle, unassuming pace before the song breaks out into full attack with snarling Dickenson vocals in the verse and a thrashing chorus. `Stranger In A Strange Land' is a true classic and another top cut on this album. A formidable, plodding bass line opens up a particularly entrancing song with plenty of diverse guitar work and a surging chorus. The interlude is a great chilled out affair with some fantastic bass/guitar interactions. `Deja-Vu' follows; definitely the weakest track on here IMO. The riffs are surprisingly catchy though however the lyrics are pretty awful with a repetitive `Feels Like I've Been Here Before' repeated chorus. It's a bit of a `Maiden on autopilot' kind of song. Still, the album picks up again with the progressive epic in `Alexander The Great'. This follows on from where `Rime Of...' left off, this time obviously though with synths. Although not as timeless as `Rime...' it's still a great slice of adventurous metal that only Maiden could do well. The lyrics, although delivered brilliantly by Dickenson, do become somewhat of a boring history lesson in parts but never the less it's a captivating epic, full of twists and turns in the melody. There's more great solos (with clever bass fills) and the interlude has riffs with an ancient feel to them, which was not doubt what the band wanted to achieve with this epic.

`Somewhere In Time' is another excellent album from Iron Maiden and is yet another successful chapter in their career during the `80's. It's a sadly underrated album that showed yet again that the band was capable of developing and producing a few more surprises. Although I wouldn't rank this alongside Maiden's 5* efforts like `Number Of The Beast' or `Powerslave', it's on the next level down, which is still fantastic and should be an integral part of any Iron Maiden fans collection. Not for a Maiden newbie, pick this one up once you've got into the band's more famous albums like `Number Of The Beast' or `Iron Maiden'. Highly recommended!!

MY RATING: 8.5/10
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite Maiden album, and one of my all-time favorites by any band, July 5, 2005
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
I love this album, but strangely enough, the first time I heard it, it didn't impress me much. It wasn't "Wasted Years" or "Stranger In A Strange Land" that made me pick this up, but rather "Deja Vu". I was in a band at the time, and was also a cartoonist, and had written a tongue-in-cheek comic book about our band in which we went forward in time to see how things would turn out. At one point in the comic, we had to go back in time 5 minutes to prevent one of us from doing something stupid, and as I was drawing this, a friend sitting next to me said something like "Have them listen to "Deja Vu" by Iron Maiden as they go back." I'd never heard the song, but that's what made me curious about it.

Anyway, I liked "Deja Vu" from the first listen, but the rest of the album did little for me. But after a few listens, it became one of my all-time favorite albums by any artist, and remains so. It's got a great sound to it, and there's not a weak track on the album. "Caught Somewhere In Time" and "Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner" are two of my favorite tracks. It's funny how something you end up liking so much can start out as something you don't really care for. But if I were stranded on a desert island and could only have a few CDs with me, this would be one of them.

Oh, and the cover is great too -- check out all the hidden Maiden references!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Somewhere In Time Review, May 5, 2003
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
It always bothers me when people put this album down just because the band decided to use guitar synthesizers. That dosen't mean they sold out or weren't "metal" anymore. In fact, other than Piece Of Mind this album and Seventh Son, which both feature guitar synthesizers, are my two favorites and were the bands most popular albums. It goes to show you that change isn't always a bad thing. Anyways, this is really the album where the guitar playing shines throughout. Seventh Son had its many moments, but this album has SUPERB playing throughout. Lyrically it is also very introspective, with great lyrics in songs like Sea Of Madness and The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner.On the latter song Bruce vividly describes what an athlete, like myslef, goes through when running a race. It is truly brilliant. Now, a song by song review.
Caught Somewhere In Time- Great way to start the album with that memorable opening riff. The chorus will be caught in your mind for a long, long time. Great synth work especially. 5/5
Wasted Years- Maybe their biggest hit besides Run To The Hills. Fun chorus, good light tempo song sandwich's between two darker ones. 5/5
Sea Of Madness- Lyrically beautiful, great chorus and a very dark atmosphere. Hardest one here uses least synth. 4.5/5
Heaven Can Wait- Very similar to Wasted Years in that its a more up-beat song. Catchy guitar solo with fun sing-a-long chorus. Good, long instrumental section as well. Lyrics have a very feel-good tone. 4.5/5
The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner- The most moving song here, really takes into what its like to run a race if you never have before, or even just competing against someone for something. Another cathcy guitar riff in the beginning, then it explodes into a fast, hard song until the chorus which is sung beautifully. 5/5
Stranger In A Strange Land- Slow and very melodic with a great opening riff. The problem is that it gets kind of repetitive and overkills the chorus. Nice solos too.4.5/5
De Ja Vu- Good lyrics, even better use of synth here really enhances the song. On BNW, Dream of Mirrors also has to do with the de ja vu thing, but this song is better, albeit less complex. 4/5
Alexander The Great- You've probably heard stuff about how this is Maiden's best song or whatever, but let me be the first to tell you that it isn't THAT great. It is very good, but I think that Bruce sings too fast and you don't always pick up on what he's saying, which is a shame because the lyrics really cool and tell about the amazing life of Alexander The Great. The music is played very tight here, making it almost sound like one instrument that's playing. Great musicianship. 4.5/5
Somewhere In Time is definetly synth-metal at its best. Pick this and Seventh Son up as soon as you can.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The forgotten masterpeice, November 28, 2002
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
Out of all the Maiden albums this is the most melodic with some really beautiful riffs, great songs which just plain rock and an album which was undoubtedly the finest hour for guitarist Adrian Smith(guitar god).
Sadly however this album rarely gets a mention and is completely overlooked on Maidens latest live set, I will concede that this album is the most 80s like but I think class of this magnitude is timeless. Songs from this album could vastly benefit Maiden's live set as they unbelievably still include songs like Sanctuary and Wrathchild which sound awful with Dickinson's voice, could you imagine Paul Di'Anno trying to sing Aces High or Flight of Icarus, please don't even try, hint hint Bruce!
CAUGHT SOMEWHERE IN TIME
Quality opener, a song with a great drive and a good chorus which you'll be singing in no time. The great drive in the song is the sort of thing that would have you unknowingly speeding if driving. A great solo from Adrian that reaches for the stars in middle and great vocals from Dickinson throughout.
WASTED YEARS
(Sings) So understand
This was Maiden's attempt to go Mainstream searching for those
radio years.
Ok this isn't my favourite song on the album because it's sounds like such a direct attempt for Maiden to get with the mainstream, tut tut. What I love about Maiden is you don't see them on t.v and the Joe public is completely oblivious to them stuck in a world a mindless catchy, substanceless pop. I shudder to think what would've happened if Maiden went mainstream. All in all it's performed well with Nicko pulling off some unreal drumming patterns, a nice opening riff and good lyrics but it's not groundbreaking and it's far too soft, ohh Maiden, what were you thinking?
SEA OF MADNESS
Now this is more like it, a darker tune with some heavy guitars which symbolise the madness theme and some strong bass to match.
Again the lyrics are top notch but the real high point is in the middle when the song bursts away from the darkness into some beautiful melodies followed by bass lines from Steve to die for, magic, love Bruce's little ooooh, ooooh,ooooh during this part, he soars for the high notes.
HEAVEN CAN'T WAIT
This ones a mixed bag in that it's soft song and all in all quite a forgettable tune. However the famous sing-along in the middle is unbelievable and turns a mediocre song into a great one, this should be on the live set all the time.
THE LONELINESS OF A LONG DISTANCE RUNNER
Wow. Best song on the album and one of Maidens all time classics. The riff is one of the best of all time, the lyrics brilliantly sum up the thinking of a sportsman (I use it to motivate myself) and the drive runs along like the runner. The explosion in the middle is a masterstroke, kind of a pure victory riff, it's just magic. You'll love it if you any kind of sportsman, even if your not.
STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND
This song has a great feel to it, really captures the emotion of the lyrics. This is Dickinson's best performance on the album not to mention the solo in the middle, OH MY GOD!
The lyrics are top quality as always from Adrian Smith and this is his best ever song.
DE JA VU
Dave and Adrian team up and create this little gem that is easily the most forgotten song on the album. A great fast number with fantastic drumming from Nicko and great lyrics, love 'cause you know this has happened before' great energy and emotion from Dickinson. The lyrics possibly touch on having lived before, classic Maiden type subject make this a great song.
ALEXANDER THE GREAT (356-323 B.C)
The classic Maiden epic album closer, the lyrics fit perfectly with the historical theme. A very grandiose drive/riff which suits it's theme perfectly fitting great drama, action, tragedy and victory on to one song, brilliant.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Always somewhere in time, September 30, 2002
By 
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
The best Maiden record. Period. From the fantastic title-song to Alexander the Great, this Maiden album gives the listeners what they want, melodic heavy songs with a band on the top. The songs are just wonderful, the "Loneliness of the lone distance runner" is a superb rock song with a catchy intro and a great solo, "Wasted years" is both hard, fast and beautiful, in it`s own right to be so. "Stranger in a strange land" is a laid back, mysterious rocker with a huge deep feeling in it. In fact, I cannot find any more words to describe the songs, so I`ll leave it like this. I guess my earlier words have described the whole album pretty well. If you want to start listening to Iron Maiden, Somewhere in time is a perfect choise, the songs will get you...CAUGHT SOMEWHERE IN TIME!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars To Boldly Go ..., June 12, 2009
This review is from: Somewhere in Time (Audio CD)
Maiden's 6th release of the 1980s followed hot on the heels of both the critically and commercially successful "Powerslave" and the triumphant "Live After Death". The monumental World Slavery Tour had cemented them as the premier metal band in the world at this point. In comparison to its illustrious predecessors, Somewhere in Time arrived to mixed reviews and left certain areas of the rabid fan base somewhat confused upon its release in the Autumn of 1986.

There are two main facts you need to know regarding this album: firstly, Maiden incorporated synthesisers in to their sound for the first time in their recording history. This rankled with the hardcore metal heads at the time, leaving many old school fans shocked and confused. With over a couple of decades hindsight, *most* of them have now gotten over this fact, but it's still a debate over whether the synths actually added anything to Maiden's sound. In my personal opinion, the inclusion of synths gives a darker, futuristic palette, fully in keeping with the overall mood of the album. Added to this were complaints from some quarters that producer Martin Birch had taken his eye off the ball for the first time, and the production of the album was not as good as on Maiden's previous releases.

The second, and perhaps more important, fact that you need to be armed with, is that this album contains no songs by Bruce Dickinson. What transpired, is that Bruce had pushed for a more acoustic, mellow feeling for the album. Bruce's songs were deemed suitably un-Maiden and were rejected out-hand by Harris, Birch et al. Fortunately, stepping up to the plate was Maiden's axe-slinger Adrian Smith, who weighed in with three compositions of his own. The remainder of the album was penned by the ever reliable Steve Harris, with one co-writing credit for Dave Murray.

OK so what about the songs? Well, coming off the back of the World Slavery Tour, Maiden were clearly on top of their game in terms of playing, and this album is probably at least as technically proficient as "Powerslave", if not more so. Of the eight songs on offer, the stand outs probably all belong to Adrian Smith. "Wasted Years" and "Stranger in a Strange Land" were both commercial hits for Maiden, and along with the third Adrian song, "Sea of Madness", tend to show a more melodic side to the band. The faithful need not have worried too much about these seemingly chart-bothering interests, as Steve Harris weighed in with some typical Maiden gallops. "Caught Somewhere in Time", is often cited as a highlight of the album, blasting off with an ominous synth intro, before taking the listener on an out of control time machine trip with a satanic Doctor Who (I kid you not!). The solos in this song are particular stand outs. Steve also contributed "Heaven Can Wait", which seems written with live concerts in mind due to its crowd sing-along section. Indeed, it was a regular in Maiden's live set for over a decade, and still makes the odd appearence these days (memorably on their "Somewhere Back in Time" world tour). The response to Steve's other songs were mixed - Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner and Deja-vu are both typical Harris gallopers, which perhaps shows some lack of inspiration or fatigue in the band's writing (remember they had just completed an 18 month world tour!). The denouement, "Alexander The Great" pays tribute to one of history's greatest dictators by painstakingly listing everything he did. Ever. In chronological order. Depending on who you speak to this is either Maiden's unsung masterpiece or a failed attempt to recreate the glory of "Rime of the Ancient Mariner". I tend towards the latter, but there's no denying that some of the music is very fine indeed.

No review of this album would be complete without mention of the cover art, which is perhaps the most intricate and well realised of all the Maiden artwork, containing hidden references to their past.

Indeed, the dark, futuristic artwork perfectly complements the overall sound and content of the album: time, time wasted, lost time ... those ominous booming synths. While this shouldn't be your first port of call as a new Maiden fan, and far from their most essential album, with hindsight, it stands well in the better half of Maiden albums. Would a Bruce Dickinson song or two have helped the album? It's hard to say. I don't think the world was ready for an acoustic Maiden in 1986, and Adrian Smith admirably filled the writing void left by Bruce. Maiden would go on to ever greater commercial success with their next release, and if nothing else, Somewhere in Time can be seen as a stepping stone for the band incorporating more technology in to their sound, for better or for worse.
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Somewhere in Time
Somewhere in Time by Iron Maiden (Audio CD - 2002)
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